truing a sprocket

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by beentryin, May 1, 2010.

  1. beentryin

    beentryin New Member

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    i cant get my sprocket to tru up for nothing.ive took someone advice and kept tightning the high side on the wobble and snapped one of the cheap bolts,whats the best way to tru up the sprocket?oh and the kit came with two set of metal sqaush rings one set is just two ant the other set is three pieces.and do i put both the rings on both sides?of the rubber then the sprocket or does one set go on the outer part of the sprocket?:-||
     
  2. Cabinfever1977

    Cabinfever1977 New Member

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    What i did was: sprocket/spokes/1 piece of rubber/ 1 set 3 metal plates, now im not saying its the right way or even safe to have the sprocket against the spokes,this is just how i chose to do it to have a straight chain line.

    The manual would say: set of 2 metal plates/sprocket/rubber/spokes/rubber/other set of 3 metal plates/, it will depend on your chain line and bike.
    It takes time and a few tries but will be worth it to have the sprocket centered.
    O and when tightening the bolts use a small wrench and/or small socket set and do not use lots of force, tighten slowly.

    And with the wheel in your lap as you're tightening the bolts alternate back and forth cross ways to tighten and use a ruler to measure from the teeth of sprocket to the hub of wheel and check for trueness,if its off you can loosen and adjust the sprocket.
    then put the wheel and chain back on and adjust chain,then turn wheel and check that the chain doesnt get loose then tight and tight then loose,if it does by a big diffrence,you will have to do it again and take it back off.
     
    #2 Cabinfever1977, May 1, 2010
    Last edited: May 1, 2010
  3. skyhawkcannondale

    skyhawkcannondale New Member

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    you can fix it my friend..
     
  4. wildemere

    wildemere New Member

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    Once you have had it real tight out of round the rubbers get the spoke pattern imprinted wrong, then it becomes hard to correct.

    Start again with the rubbers flipped over with some temporary shims to hold it true for the initial clamp down.
     
  5. mapbike

    mapbike Active Member

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    One rubber pad split with scissors between bolt holes on the inside of spokes around wheel hub, One rubber pad on outside of spokes, put a bolt through one of the holes in the sprocket and place it through both rubber pads and then place one of the metal plates on the inside of the spokes so that the hole that is in the center of the steel plate fits over the bolt, move over to the third hole right or left and repeat by placing bolt through sprocket and through both rubber pads place another of the steel plates inside spokes over hub and bolt should go through the middle hole of this one as well and then repeat these same steps on the last steel plate, now tighten each of the bolts down equally and make sure the steel plate dont overlap at the edges, after they are just good and snug but not tight, place all of the remaining bolts through the sprocket and rubber pads, put nut on each one as you put it in and when they are all in, just start slowly working your way around the bolts tightening them a little at a time until they are starting to get snug but not tight yet, at this point if you have a bench vise put the axle nut on one side of wheel and tight it all the way down the axle and then tighten up the nut in vise jaws( NOT the THREADS) on the axle in the vise with sprocket facing up so that the wheel can be spun freely, now you can turn the wheel and check for alignment as you evenly tighten each bolt a little at a time until they are all good and tight, just watch the sprocket as you turn the wheel and adjust it side to side to get it even in this area, ( I build a pointer out of an 1/8" steel rod and build me a stand to the side of the wheel on my work bench so that the rod will be held in place and extended out over the wheel and just to the edge of the sprocket so I can make sure the sprocket is running true while wheel is turning) at the same time watch the edge of the sprocket as the wheel spins and adjust the "wobble" out of it while tightening the bolts evenly. Hope you can understand how I put all this, just said it the best I could think to say it with out pics. hope this helps.
     
  6. kicking

    kicking New Member

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  7. Noped

    Noped New Member

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    Hey fellers,

    I'm in the middle of installing my raggedy joint sprocket and have all the bolts through and correctly; prob is that the banana clips are indeed overlapping.

    will this fall into place once i've tightened everything?

    was there a technique in doing this? for now i'm trying to hammer punch them but the rubber is very bouncy making it difficult.

    help?
     
  8. Mind_Reader7

    Mind_Reader7 New Member

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    Loosen it up, and pry the clips so they sit next to each other, and slowly tighten them down. This is the hardest part of setting the bike up.

    Also, go to the hardware store and get some slef locking nuts, otherwise all the nuts/bolts are gunna come loose sooner or later and you'll have to re do it.
     
  9. Noped

    Noped New Member

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    Thanks buddy; i believe you; this is the hardest part; your right about those cheesy looking bolts too; i replaced them with american standard and i got em about a quarter inch longer; hope the excess bolt doesn't make any diff. i don't think i could have stood the aggravation of the shorter ones. I think i have it loose enough to work with.
    as far as truing, can't i just sort of eyeball the sprocket hole with the hub material it sets on?

    thanks
     
  10. Mind_Reader7

    Mind_Reader7 New Member

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    That's how I did it tbh, seems to have worked fine.

    You put the head of the bolt on the inside of the wheel, and have the excess stick out. You can cut off some excess if need be. However I wouldn't cut all of the excess off, because if you need to take it off, working with short bolts can be kinda hard.
     
  11. Noped

    Noped New Member

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    well i got to quit for now; my backs' hertin. i got all the banana clips flat and the long bolts helped a lot until now i see i'm out of thread and so i'll try and pull em out one at a time and put the shorter ones back. at the hardware store i couldn't find them with threads all the way. i'll go later and maybe mount the new carb or start on the motor mount.
    thanks again for pitching in for me tonite.

    kevin
     
  12. Noped

    Noped New Member

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    Hey,

    You said, " watch the edge of the sprocket as the wheel spins and adjust the "wobble" out of it while tightening the bolts evenly. "

    On this last part of your quote, could you please elaborate on how to "adjust the "wobble" out of it while tightening the bolts evenly"? can't see in my head what that looks like. also when i finally get on true, how do i know it's tight enough cause the rubber spacers give a lot.

    thanks
     

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