Thoughts?

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by Greenbiker, Feb 16, 2016.

  1. Greenbiker

    Greenbiker New Member

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    So, as ive memtiomed in several posts, im about to start a build and im bouncing ideas off people.
    Ive been doing motorized bikes for a few years now and one of the more frustrating things about them, both gas and electric, is road side repairs, whether its a flat on either end, or fixing something bunged in the motor or trans, its a pain at best.
    So heres my solution. Im gonna buy a frickin folding work stand amd tote it around with me in the rear basket i will put on it.
    Like this one:http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...liid=I1RGJ6TV72DG8G&ref_=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_ttl
    Its a little heavy i know, but once i have all the stuff im gonna have on my bike one there its not gonna be flip over friendly and i will need a pretty solid way of lifting it both at home and abroad. Anyone tried this? I think i will be at just about the stands rated weight limit so it should hold up just fine.
     
  2. MEASURE TWICE

    MEASURE TWICE Active Member

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    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Wolfcraft-MASTER-600-CLAMPING-WORKING-TABLE-WFC-6182000-/190863035331

    I bought this in Bay Area at a Homedepot store for only about 50 dollars US and CA sales tax about 10 years ago. Not sure why it is so expensive and seems only available from UK. Google I searched but only found different model Wolfcraft benches near buy at local stores or mail order in US.

    I used it to hold my bike and do weld and grind metal with clamps I bought separate. Though the table has a leaf you remove and also clamp and also adjust height. It folds nice too.

    The product you looked at seem more designed to work better holding a bike frame.

    I can somewhere find a picture where I am working on the bike before it was done. The table handles a lot of weight.

    I'd probably like to have both and a nice out of the rain shop, but I get by;)

    MT
     
  3. Greenbiker

    Greenbiker New Member

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    That would be good for home, no way i would be toting that on the bike without a trailer which i have not included in my immediate build but will come later. Im calculating that inwill be arounf the sixtyish lb mark by the time i have everything done, so i think the stand will hold up. But it is one more thing to secure. Thats a pretty good price for that table though.
    At another time, i was going to use iron pipe nipples to make a rest to the top tube to sit in and ratchet straps to secure it to something like a utility pole or a light pole, since ,ost of my riding usually includes a lot of these, i would always be within feet of somehwere to hoist my bike up. It proba ly wouldnt be any lighter than this by the time i was done, but it would ne smaller, but less universal also. Its a cluncky problem. It has a clunky solution i guess.
     
    #3 Greenbiker, Feb 17, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2016
  4. bluegoatwoods

    bluegoatwoods New Member

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    As a simpler and cheaper alternative, you could just carry some rope with you. Then find a tree or a road sign and hang your bike up for repairs.

    I always carry a pair of lasing straps. For this purpose, kinda. Though I'll admit that I don't think I've ever actually hung up my bike for a road repair. I'm more likely to walk home, grab the car and come back for the bike.
     
  5. MEASURE TWICE

    MEASURE TWICE Active Member

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    Sorry, I zoned out reading all about road side repair. Ropes and other ways always can be Macgyvered!

    I've found logs in the outback and used them to keep a wheel off the ground so I can spin it without load... etc.

    You'll come up with something.
     
  6. Tony01

    Tony01 Active Member

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    why not just build it so that you don't need to fix it constantly? If you are fixing it frequently then something is wrong.
     
  7. Greenbiker

    Greenbiker New Member

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    Ah, yes, the its built right so nothing can go wrong approach. Theres a boat no ones seen since 1912 that fell victim to that mentality. But you are right, i will build the bike well, but **** happens, ive used liners and sealant both in a tire and got flats, eother a sidewall, or a valve stem break from the tire shifting over time and taking the tube with it, causing it to wear against the stem hole. Might have to make chain alighment or tension adjustments or who knows what else. Since im going to have something to elevate it at home, i figure why not on the road and why not have those be the same thing. Stands are also very helpful for shifter adjustment and wheel adjustment on the bike.
     
  8. a_dam

    a_dam New Member

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    Great minds think alike, Bluegoatwoods!

    I was going to recommend lashing straps too, assuming nobody else mentioned it first. Good thing I actually read the previous posts first.

    I've always carried a lashing strap with me because it's what I prefer for strapping loads on my rack. It wasn't long before I learned that flipping a MB upside-down to fix a flat is not ideal.

    I'm talking about the straps with the metal, spring-loaded, toggle-gripper-thing. The strap is about 8 feet long and lets me hoist the bike up enough to fix flats and such; as long as there is a suitable tree branch or something to toss the strap over. I've been motorized for about 8 years and used the strap for repairs 4 maybe 5 times.
     
    #8 a_dam, Feb 18, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2016
  9. Greenbiker

    Greenbiker New Member

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    That was kinda what i meant woth my other idea. Using iron pipe nipples and ratchet straps. I could thread together two bases with "hooked" arms, using two 6 or 8" nipples, a t joint, and 4 2 or three inch nipples off either end of the t. The hooks woukd be standard elbow fittings, i would wrap the contact surfaces in foam insularion and use ratchet straps to strap it to a pole of some sort. Might have to add a piece or to to keep the arms from turning under load but that easy, this would work well for telephone poles and tall parking lot lamp poles, stuff like that. That might emd up being as expensive as the $50 stand above, its probably heavier and its more limited, though it would more than likely last longer. It woukd take up less space, but i kinda like the stand idea. I appreciate all the feedback guys, i do. I have carried ropes and carabiners to hang a bike, and it works, it does. Kinda. Its still a PITA though, im wanting something i can snap it into, lift, tighten, work, lower, release, fold, put away and drive off. I want to be able to do anything almost from anywhere or at home. I think this discussion has made me realize even more why i wanted the stand to begin with. Thanks guys.
     
  10. Tony01

    Tony01 Active Member

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    Please delete.
     
    #10 Tony01, Feb 18, 2016
    Last edited: May 9, 2016
  11. Greenbiker

    Greenbiker New Member

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    No disrespect intended, i was just pointing out that not being prepared for problems makes them worse when they happen. I don't want to have to walk the bike home because i couldnt change the tube, or be late to work because i had to f around looking for a place to hang my motorbike. I want to unfold , clamp, raise, fix, lower, refold, get on the road again. I have, can, and will improvise when i have to, but i would rather have the right equipment when i need it. It very unlikely for me to have a house fire, and i can call the fire department, but i keep more than one extinguisher handy and i bet you do to. And no, the flats from the valve stem werent from poor finishing, im heavy and heavy breaking caused the tire and tube to slip. It happens. Your ideas though are nice second layer backups. Again no offense intended, i just have a different perspective I guess.
     
  12. Tony01

    Tony01 Active Member

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    No fire extinguishers at my house (bad idea). All appliances have timers on them, so nothing can start a fire due to being left on/user error. No carpets only rugs and hardwood floors also minimizes fire risk. Roof was redone with fire resistant shingles. Getting a very cheap security system that will notify me via text if it detects smoke. Prevention over redundancy.

    I'm not heavy for my height (180), but when you consider my bike weighed about 120 or more plus the basic hand tools I carried and topped out at over 50mph, the forces have to be similar. And yeah, I did some very hard stops that made both front and rear brakes too hot to touch... If the rear wheel was still on the ground. I used to run pedicabs as well... Coming down a hill with 800lbs worth of customers, bike, and me never caused tire shifting.

    My point is that tire shifting has to be addressed as a problem and solved by fixing the problem. Buying a foldable bike stand to carry with you for every time your tire shifts will onl make the problem worse - for starters the load you carry will be 30lbs more. Have you considered a center kick stand?


    Now for the problem of tire shifting:

    If you are running chrome plated steel rims, I suggest you switch to aluminum rims because the coefficient of friction of aluminum is more than double that of chrome, and about 50% higher than steel. Same reason why people using rim brakes prefer aluminum rims. If you're concerned with the strength, a V-section double walled aluminum rim will be just as stronger than a single wall steel rim with half the weight.
    http://www.engineersedge.com/coeffients_of_friction.htm

    What tires and pressure are you running? I'm thinking you need to run higher pressure tires.. I ran kendas at 45-55 and you can also get cst cyclops tires cheap that will handle 65psi. Low pressure tires will move sometimes. aluminum rims and high pressure to push the tire against the rim should solve your shifting problems.
     
    #12 Tony01, Feb 18, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2016
  13. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

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    here's the stand I use when my big build-stand is busy - an old exercise stand I bought for $15 & removed the exercise unit from it

    round legs fold flat for carrying on rear bike rack

    bikestand.jpg
     
  14. Greenbiker

    Greenbiker New Member

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    Yes, will have the slippage problem solved. It may have been a low pressure issue, or it may have been a cheap poorly made rim issue. But that has been done away with. If the stamd is too heavy, i will do something else. Ive tried hanging a bike before and im not around enough stuff with clearance for me to reach the bits and pieces often enough for it to be viable. The stand just offers almost 100% reliability in that regard. But you are right, building to not need it is the best defense. I will have good tires, i will have good tubes, with liners, and sealant. **** i even thought of mounting a shop broom to my front fork to sweep the area ahead of me (just kidding) i will have my tires inflated to the right pressure, and i will check them. It may end up being something i only use at home and come up with something else for the road. I may ultimatelynbe using this for longish trips and i can always just call someone to come get me or come get the bike later. And yes i will have a center kickstand but ive had a pretty poor relationship with kickstands before, so im not gomma rely on it to be my go to solution. Prevention is primary of course, like you said, but two is one and one is none. Soni will have rope or other hanging cordage, i will hav ethe kickstand, and i will have the work stand. I should be covered. I just taken too many preventative ,easures before and had them fail, cause me a lot of grief not to do something better when i can.
     
  15. Greenbiker

    Greenbiker New Member

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    Crassius,
    Thats an idea i had too, and that might be a better or more portable solution for this. I will consider it.
     
  16. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

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    so far I've had no problems getting rear axle nuts into stand and starting the motor
     
  17. a_dam

    a_dam New Member

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    It won't lift both wheels up like a work stand, but how about a double-kickstand or centerstand?

    I've seen small motorcycles with those built-on center stands. You pull the bike backwards while kicking the stand down and the rear wheel is suspended off the ground. Plus, it's more stable than the average side kickstand.

    Somewhere on these forums are posts from people who built them for their motorized bikes. If this would serve your purpose, then it would be a lot more convenient than always carrying a stand on your bike rack.
     
  18. MEASURE TWICE

    MEASURE TWICE Active Member

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    Exactly as a_dam says. I have a center stand, and although I may need a little extra height for wheel up in the air ground clearance, I shim with a piece of wood. While on trail riding I don't carry the wood as I find plenty around. I've not needed both wheels off the ground at one time.

    I can tip to the opposite wheel up in the air by either shimming one of the wheels up, or with a weight shift on the bike. Lines also tethered to immovable objects, tree, rock etc and I set up to fix a flat. Some how never needed a patch a flat, but have the tools and pump with me.
     
  19. Greenbiker

    Greenbiker New Member

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    Ok, some crow eating is in order here. I got the stand. 40ish on amazon. China made for sure, but steel where it counts and i only needed to make minor modifications for my purpose. One, the cushions on the clamp were good, but, they were not attached at all, just slid on. So soe gorilla glue and some clamping fixed that. The arm the clamp is on slides into a plastic housing which even tightened all the way, would not keep the arm from rotating with the bike in the clamp. Well some self fusing repair tape wrapped around the end fixed that. However, two things are going to prevent me from using this as a portable stand carried on the bike. One, even through labled as portable, its not really, its pretty heavy, and big as **** even folded up. And the fix for the rotating pretty much eliminated the possibility of removing the clamp arm to make it even remotely possible to reasonably carry on a bike long term. So its a home based stand for sure, but i think i found a solution that will work for me pretty well. It will stick out of my basket, but it coukd be possibly strapped along the top tube. Its not really fpr working on the bike on, but more for holding it while i take the rear wheel off and put it back on or doing other light adjustemts snd such. I can break the nuts loose on the ground, then finish the removal on the stand it wont have to bear all the weight of the bike because the front will still be on the ground. They have a model with a nice pump built into the assembly, but this is cheaper and lighter.
    http://www.amazon.com/Topeak-98911-...2&sr=1-2-fkmr0&keywords=topeak+transformer+xx
    I think this will work pretty well. I think i might be able to make something similar, so i will decode whst to do and post abiit it when i do.
     
  20. Chaz

    Chaz Active Member

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    I use a ratchet strap with big hooks to change tires etc. It's not the best for truing a wheel but serves pretty good for just about anything else and takes up very little room and weighs less than a pound. There's always a tree or something to attach to. Once you get familiar with it you can even hoist it up to chest high to work standing up.
     

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