Schwinn Jaguar Rear Hub

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by myke, Mar 28, 2009.

  1. myke

    myke New Member

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    I am looking for some options for a rear hub upgrade for this bike. I picked up a Schwinn Jaguar at Target today and started the build tonight. After reading all the information on this forum I could find that relates, I pretty much have a plan for mounting the motor.

    I am wondering what are my options for a rear hub? Is there a solid mount hub that free wheels and enables you to bolt the sprocket on and still keep the gear cluster on the opposite side?

    I can't seam to get past the idea of bolting the rear sprocket to the spokes.

    Thanks for any advise.

    myke
     
  2. azbill

    azbill Active Member

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    I had problems with the stock rear wheel...I bent 6-7 spokes mounting the sprocket...very weak spokes
    changed to a dh mtn bike wheel (formula disc hub, rhyno lite double-wall rim)...haven't had a prob since
    I also put a new front wheel...sturmey-archer x-fd drum brake hub, same rhyno lite rim
    I found the wheels to be the weakest components on the Jag
     
  3. azbill

    azbill Active Member

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    Dan, I don't have the dynamo hub, just the drum
    estimated mileage 6000+ miles (4th bike)
    I first used it on a nirve deviate chopper (very heavy bike),it was the only brake...rear wheel was free-coaster, never had any problems stopping even when flying down mt lemon in tuscon (50+mph - no engine running)
    other than a couple of adjustments tighter, it has never been touched, I checked a few months ago, and the shoes still look almost new

    iow...I am very happy with this hub...hope to get many more miles outta her :):):)
     
  4. Dan

    Dan Staff
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    Very cool Bill. That's good news. TY
     
  5. myke

    myke New Member

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    Dan, thanks for the feedback. It's gonna take me awhile to understand why the need for a pull start with some hub's. The best my brain can visualize is that if the rear wheel is turning then the engine must be, are you saying with some hub's that is not the case?

    Yes, 2 stroke China girl I believe is what you call it.

    myke
     
  6. Dan

    Dan Staff
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    Really is confusing. No worries and I know how frustrating it can be. The acronyms, slang and all that. (say once in front of your wife "the guys" are making fun of you for your method of mounting a china girl, snork)

    With out a pull start, you have to peddle or some folks call it "bump start". If the rear wheel turns freely (freewheels) then the chain will not turn the motor sprocket and turn over the engine. With the rear sprocket fixed to the wheel, it drives the chain as the bike is peddled forward with or without the motor running.

    I have been wanting to use a freewheel hub for a while. My new engine has a pull start so I can shop for one in earnest. The advantage to having one is that when you peddle with the motor turned off, there is no resistance from the engine drive chain. With out the freewheel hub, you have to move both chains by peddling.
     
  7. myke

    myke New Member

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    A rear hub like this one from TigerToothBikes.com is an example of the type that you can pedal and bump start the engine, right?

    I understand the drawback of having to turn the second chain while peddling, but do you really need to peddle very much?

    I am also curious if many people prefer to have more speeds for the peddle drive of the bike, or is it mostly in the way to have more gears and shifters?

    myke
     
    #7 myke, Mar 28, 2009
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2009
  8. Dan

    Dan Staff
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    Yeppers, that's it.

    Peddling helps with hills and getting the bike rolling. I like to think of it as "auxiliary low-end" A lil help for the engine goes a long way. Also I have lost count of how many times I have had to peddle home for repairs or to the gas station while out ridding. Honestly, you don't have to peddle much, but when you do, you really do.

    I personally like as many gears as possible. Is kind of like a gun. Better to have one and not need it, then to need it and not have one. (although the judge said I was not allowed to have one any more. No sense of humor, them folks)

    For first builds I suggest to most folks, keep it as simple and as stock as possible. Is cheaper and makes it easier to find out what you really want or need to upgrade.

    All of this is just one opinion. There are many on every thing you can do with these lil wonders. Your doing the right and prudent thing. Researching and talking. Some amazing crafts folks here who do great stuff. Tiger at tiger tooth is an excellent resource.

    Hope that's of some help
    .rd.
     

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