Sandblast grit?

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle Welding, Fabrication and Paintin' started by Trey, May 14, 2013.

  1. Trey

    Trey $50 Cruiser

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    Can anyone tell me if 30 grit white silica sand is appropriate for sandblasting my frame etc? A friend has a machine I can borrow, but I need to supply my own sand.
    Thanks!
     
  2. rustycase

    rustycase Gutter Rider

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    It seems a bit coarse to me yet should do a quick job of taking the paint off a frame.

    The ticket is... to stop! when the paint is removed... No extra blasting...

    Be sure to use a good dust mask!
    rc
     
  3. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    White silica is considered a 'soft' abrasive by abrasive standards. There are many out there all with intended purposes. Some are much softer, like walnut shell and aluminum oxide where there are others made from metal slag. Hard and agressive.
    The pressure, psi, at which you blast also has an affect on how well, or poor, an abrasive works.

    If you're just removing paint the white silica will probably suffice. Anything around 100psi should work for you but do a little research and see the health and safety considerations when using any sand blasting media and equipment. Typically you'll want to use a respirator and do the blasting outdoors in good ventilation.

    Tom
     
  4. Trey

    Trey $50 Cruiser

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    Thank you gentlemen.
    This set-up handles minor surface rust on steel when I use it as his helper. Didn't want to be too aggressive on the Schwinn. I will exercise proper safety precautions.
     
  5. maniac57

    maniac57 Old, Fat, and still faster than you

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    Use the lowest pressure that gets it done.
    I always start low and work up to the agression level needed, especially on thinner metals like car bodies (which is mostly what I learned on.)
    Lower pressure is also easier to control and less hard on equipment and consumables.
    You start using big pressure and agressive media, you start using a lot more nozzles and air lines.
     
  6. Trey

    Trey $50 Cruiser

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    20 grit white silica, at 110psi, did the trick nicely. (fyi: 90psi had some effect)
    Thank you fellas.
     

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