sand and sideways

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by hutchinson, Sep 6, 2013.

  1. hutchinson

    hutchinson New Member

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    Two part question...

    Theres a certain surf spot that requries a mile long bike ride along the beach in hard packed sand at lower tides and semi packed still manageable sand at high tides. But getting there first requires me to put my bike laying down in the trunk. I haven't tried any of this yet with all my parts put on but i could imagine that i would need to lean the bike over before putting it in my trunk to get all the fuel out of the carb so i dont get a mess. With the sand I'm on the fence. I was thinking about rigging something around the filter but in regards to the sprocket, chain, etc I dont know how much this sand would get in there considering its like cement at low tide.
     
  2. Kioshk

    Kioshk Active Member

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    In my experience, I've shut off the fuel-petcock at the tank, emptied the carb-bowl, and replaced the gas-cap with a rubber surgical glove secured with some fat rubber-bands. To be on the safe-side, lay the bike on some old towels on plastic garbage-bags.

    Now, getting BACK from the spot: is this motorized bicycle a pull-start? You may have problems starting your engine if it's manual-clutch, even @ low-tide.
     
  3. hutchinson

    hutchinson New Member

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    no just pop the clutch, the sand is still hard enough to get a good amount of speed but im just concerned about sand damaging the bike
     
  4. xseler

    xseler Well-Known Member

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    Even though the sand is 'hard', there's still not as much friction as on pavement ---- the rear wheel may just dig in and not rotate as it would on pavement.

    Best of luck in your adventure!!
     
    #4 xseler, Sep 6, 2013
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2013
  5. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    A sandy environment can be tough on machinery of any kind. However I get the feeling that you're not planning on making this beach trip every day for extended periods so I wouldn't worry too much about damage to the chains or wheel bearings. I'd be more concerned with salt than sand.
    Rinse the bike off with fresh water after your beach rides and you should be fine.
    As for transporting, just drain the tank and carburetor if you're concerned about leaks in your car and carry your fuel in an approved container.

    I also concur with the other warnings that starting the engine in sand might be a challenge. It would depend on your gear ratio and compression. You might need to pedal a little faster than on a hard surface before engaging the clutch and also slipping the clutch a little might help.
    Good luck and take some photos to share with us of your sea-side rides.

    Tom
     

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