Running for the 1st time

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by Evan, Dec 20, 2009.

  1. Evan

    Evan New Member

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    Well, the time is near and I will be running my motor for the first time today. Being brand new (both me and the motor) is there anything I night want to do before firing it up? I dunno..... couple drops of oil in the chamber? "Prime" it some how? etc. I want to do it right to get the most out of my new found hobby. Everyone here has been so helpful and I hope that I'm not (again) asking something that has already been covered. Thanks for all the help.
    Evan dnut
     
  2. Venice Motor Bikes

    Venice Motor Bikes Custom Builder / Dealer/Los Angeles

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    Just mix the gas at 24:1 & fire it up!! Also, don't let it idle!! (just start riding it.)
    Cruise it around the neighborhood for a while & get it nice & warm, & then you can start riding it normally.
     
  3. wes

    wes New Member

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    there is a whole thread on peoples opinion for proper break in prcedures, you might check it out, there is a primer on the left side of the carberator, it is a little plunger, push it in for a couple seconds and you will se the fuel flow down the line and into the float bowl, after that give everything a once over and i usually ride down the rode and check chain tension and roll and so on before i ever pop the clutch, take your time a be patient so that you dont miss anything, Good luck Evan, and welcome to the Forumn!!!
     
  4. xlite

    xlite New Member

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    I suggest pedalling around awhile and try a few hills to make sure the chain is ok then let that clutch out.
     
  5. Venice Motor Bikes

    Venice Motor Bikes Custom Builder / Dealer/Los Angeles

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    Thats actually very good advice!! I've been building these for so long that I rarely have trouble with the chains, (but a first time builder probably will!!!)
     
  6. Evan

    Evan New Member

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    Good advice. As soon as the rain lets up I'm goin out.
    E
     
  7. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    And pedal slow and keep a close eye on the chain tensioner (if you're using one). Too mnay people want to see how fast it will go first thing and that's where they get into trouble. Easy does it for a block or so to assure that everything is working and staying where its supposed to be before twisting that throttle too much. Good luck, keep us posted on your success.
    Tom
     
  8. xlite

    xlite New Member

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    Personally pedaling slow is not my method. I'd rather find a problem by pedaling fast or rolling down hill than going slow with the engine running. This is specially important if, like me, you're one of the brave souls who forgo tensioners.

    I do agree about taking it easy for awhile when that engine is fired up.
     
  9. Evan

    Evan New Member

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    Well I had a few issues with the chain and then the clutch. The idler was crooked to the chain no matter how i mounted it on the frame so i heated it up and bent it a bit. Then i had to mess with the clutch a bit to get it to work and not collide with the brake handle/gear shifter on the handlebars. Now it's dark (and raining) probably not the best time for my first ride. I'll have a couple hours of sunlight in the morning before I have to go to work so hopefully i'll get it going then. Not sure i'll be able to keep myself from trying again tonight but as you probably guessed i'm quite antsy. Thanks for everyones help so far. i'll keep you posted.
     
  10. captainrichhill

    captainrichhill New Member

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    Make your first powered "flight" a short one. Maybe just around the block then let it cool down and check all the nuts and bolts before your next ride. If you ride it in "baby steps" it won't leave you stranded and pedeling home because a nut is loose on something.
     
  11. Nougat

    Nougat New Member

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    Sounds like you're in good shape. The stock chain tensioner bracket does need to be twisted a bit to make the idler line up right with the chain. Another bit of advice - if you don't replace any other hardware on the engine kit, at least replace the bolts/nuts that hold the tensioner bracket to the frame. The grade 4 bolts are too soft, and the threads will strip before you get it tight enough to stay where it's supposed to stay.

    I can attest to the greatness of a dual-pull brake handle. I ran for a little while without one, and the brake handle on the left side, with the clutch handle, was completely useless. So either just depend on whatever brake you have on the right side, or get a dual-pull.
     
  12. Evan

    Evan New Member

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    What exactly is a "dual pull brake"?
    Evandance1
     
  13. Nougat

    Nougat New Member

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  14. restapukin

    restapukin New Member

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    Not for me, brothers & sisters, i like independent control of front and rear braking too much to ever give it away. I would not feel safe with a double brake lever. What can i tell you.

    I like real good brakes that allow me to safely throw on the brakes at full strength and with good feel ... modern brake blocks that brake just as good in the wet are wonderful...

    But speaking of wet weather, it's when the rain starts that i fear two-into-one brake contraptions the most....

    call me old-fashioned
     
  15. Nougat

    Nougat New Member

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    If I have to choose between one handle pulling both brakes, and two separate handles where one is all but useless because the clutch is in the way, I'm going to choose dual pull.
     

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