reliability question ( 2 stroke HT)

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by lucajo16, Nov 10, 2014.

  1. lucajo16

    lucajo16 Member

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    I just sold my first bike due to the need of a real moped...about to buy a times moped.

    Let me list my comments as to why I sold it ( it was a bike berry engine kit)
    I sold it because i always had gas on my pants when i got to work, the clutch acted up and the engine failed to start a few times.

    My question for those with some decent experince is. IF i were to do engine work before i put it on, i replace most of the parts that cause issues i.e sprocket adapter, idler chain pully, bolts and carb...do you think i could get it to be as reliable as the tomos im about to buy? ( i want 2 really. The tomos for long trips and commuting over 50miles weekly and the HT for short trips less then 35 weekly. Do you think this is possible? If not then my 2nd motorbike will probably be more of a show bike. I like the HT 2 strokes but if I can't get even 10 miles in a week without having to work on my engine then its an issue i wanna avoid. The comments wont stop me. I just wanna know how reliable they can be if i put time into my next engine. Ive planned it out to use a dax engine, sportsmen flyer wheels, monark fork and to top it all off a 1950 jc higgins jet frame and tank. Other things are a performence carb (dont know which one yet) and a phantom bikes muffler.
     
  2. Patchy

    Patchy Member

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    Get the real moped if you want reliability. I like to think my motorbike is pretty reliable but randomly it can act up and had made me late for work and left me peddling miles home. If you like working on the bikes, then go that route.

    Personally I love working on these 66cc motors, I'm going to take a small engine repair class, I can't wait to bring one of these Chine girls in and tune it.
     
  3. lucajo16

    lucajo16 Member

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    Small engine repair class? Where do you go to take such a class? College?
     
  4. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

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    reliability is about how it's built & how it's used

    good, experienced builders have few problems once it has run in & had usual adjustments done

    seems you could buy 6 ht-bikes for the price of a moped

    if out of gas, few folks can pedal a moped up a long hill

    lots to consider here, but I'd probably be comparing between ht-bike and a real scooter rather than a moped if reliability was the only important point
     
  5. lucajo16

    lucajo16 Member

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    I plan to use the moped as a commuter and the HT as a hobby / off day rider. I just was wanting to hear other peoples experiences with the HT engine before I get my kit. Cause Eather my kit will be modded or it will have the exterior cleaned up for bike shows. I just thought I'd ask.
     
  6. mapbike

    mapbike Active Member

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    Luck of the draw when getting the China girl engine plays a part in the whole mix of things, but several other things have to be factored in if you hope to get reasonable reliability from even a good engine to start with.

    Remember in many thing less can be more, what I mean by that is dont think that a whole pile of neat gadgets automatically translates into all things being better and more reliable, we have vendors here and elsewhere who do have quality upgrades that actually add to better looks and better reliability potential, but on the other side of the coin we have the snake oil stuff also.

    I say, before you even put a wrench on the engine, potential good reliability starts with the bicycle itself, personally I dont think you need a high end high dollar bike, but if you can get higher quality frame, that isn't a bad thing atall and is a plus no doubt.

    I have found that most all regular bike wheels can be very reliable and have a long life.

    1. true the wheel and make sure spokes are all tensioned good
    2. use a HIGH quality tacky grease in the front bearings and the rear hub whether it is a multi-speed wheel or a coaster hub. an easy to find and very good grease in my opinion is Lucas High Tack Red Grease, AutoZone and other auto parts store normally carry it.
    3. make sure that bearing tension on wheels is as tight as possible without binding, and check for loose bearings in wheels before every ride by shaking wheel side to side and watching for bearing slack, I have several 1000 miles on my bikes, all have standard quality wheels and no issues with any of them having ever had a bearing failure.

    I do recommend if you want to run a coaster brake rear wheel, try to get one with a Shimano Hub, they are better than the other china made hubs, better bearings and better braking for sure, but even with them I take them apart and re pack with quality grease.

    As for the engine;

    A quality upper wrist pin bearing is essential, good quality intake gasket, a well tuned carb, ( prefer the RT and the NT Speed carb myself, either will do a great job.) ,quality spark plug boot (NGK or and automotive boot) ,a better free flowing exhaust like a SBP expansion exhaust is a great way to go if you will replace that short life silicone hose with copper pipe fitting and use a spring and hose clamps to hold joints together, if you run a chain tensioner roller, use one that is better than the kit roller, I have some made up that I have sold a few of that have high quality bearings and the rollers are bullet proof, I make them out of skate board wheels and they work great.
    use a quality KMC 415 or even better 415H chain and if you run a rag joint sprocket adapter make sure it is mounted corectly to wheel, straight and true and use a dab of thread locker on mounting bolts, for an even better look and better long term reliability, the Manic/Pirate/Jakes/....etc clamshell sprocket hub adapters are the best looking set up and are less wear and tare on the wheel spokes for sure.

    There are a few other little odds and ends to be considered of course, but in my experience the things I listed here are a good start for having a China Girl Build that will give pritty good reliable service.

    Two more things that are important, if you try to blow it up by running it WOT all the time, you will....!

    If you don't run a quality oil at the correct mix, you'll have a short lived engine.

    I'm sure others will chime in and add to my opinions here which is great, I have not had a problem with building fairly reliable china Girls once I knew what the important things are to do first off and the things to keep an eye on regularly.

    Best wishes on the Hobby build, but for the main everyday ride the Tomos will get you there and back more reliably I'm sure.

    Map
     
  7. lucajo16

    lucajo16 Member

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    Hay map. I bought your idler and I gotta say its AMAZING! I love that you used a quality skate wheel (Ive done some skating before but prefer mountain boards now) I'm buying another kit and rest assured as long as you make those I'll buy em. Its nice to hear from you sir :D

    As far as my HT its being done with all reliable sources like dax, pats wheels and and mount and of course your idler. Now what I'd like to ask is how often do you repair/ maintenance your HT engines on your bike? I plan to go full throttle with my next bike and buy all the good stuff...actually not using a kit but just the engine. >_> I don't like what my first kit offered XD espically the leaky carb....
     

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