Regular bicycle chain for motor?

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by leadfarmer, Oct 6, 2011.

  1. leadfarmer

    leadfarmer New Member

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    I am working on my first build and it seems the heavy duty chain that came with my 69cc from Dax, is going to rub against my 2.25 tire. I bought a new single speed bicycle chain to use. Will this be strong enough?
    BTW, I have my sprocket turned "in" because that seemed to line up best with the motor sprocket. Should I turn it "out" for clearance?
     
  2. decoherence

    decoherence New Member

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    don't use regular chain. it will stretch & snap.
    first, the chain needs to be straight.
    so turn the dish outward. if it is not inline with the engine you may have to try & mount it a little off centre.
    or you may need to get a smaller tire.
     
  3. Nashville Kat

    Nashville Kat Active Member

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    Most motror sprocks will not accept the 1/8" chain- I bought a narrow one a couple years back with the chain, and wanted to put it on a road bike- mostly to save weight.

    it jumped the sprocket on first use- although it looked straight and I'm an experienced bike mechanic- I scrapped both it and the road frame because the clearances were a problem- and put it on a cruiser with 700c wheels. The 415 is a little heavy, but really does seem to have a "slop" factor on most sprockets- greater room for error. While I thought I could probably get it to work- I didn't want to be messing around with it- As it was, I lost the woodruff key in the mess, and had to get another one of those- so that little bit of metal cost me weeks waiting.

    a 1.75 tire with a smooth tread will give you more clearance and have a better roll and a lot less vibration at motor speeds. Much lighter too. You can also get 1.50 or even 1.25. I've ridden 1.75 and they're durable, but I'd get 1.5 if I was buying 26" tires now- to me it's mostly about the roll.

    If it's a freewheel hub- you can always get a little side direction with axle washers and spacers- Never built a coaster brake build, so I don't know there.
     
    #3 Nashville Kat, Oct 6, 2011
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2011
  4. happycheapskate

    happycheapskate New Member

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    I've used KMC single speed chains and it works. I can't fit a 415 chain (hits my spokes- coaster brake build with the grubee cog on the hub and one donut to mount)

    DO NOT use a walmart chain. I tried it for grins and it snapped in 10 minutes.

    I've heard of people using garage door opener chains from the hardware store.

    Either way, you might have to file your cog teeth a little (either to "sharpen" them or to shorten them if you are getting chain jump or clicking)

    Going to the 36 tooth and using a spring tensioner made a world of difference.

    I am thinking of adding a rear rim brake and swapping the hub to a freewheel hub, but that would add a lot of expense (brake and lever, mounting plate for brake, hub, BMX freewheel, sprocket adapter-not using those rubber donuts to center the cog! scary)
     
  5. leadfarmer

    leadfarmer New Member

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    Thanks for the advice. I will try turning my dish side out, that should give me more clearance. Besides what is more fun than spending an hour re doing the sprocket sandwich mount?
     
  6. happycheapskate

    happycheapskate New Member

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    $35, Grubee has OTS Pineapple sprocket adapters (metal sandwich mount with spoke grooves)
     
  7. The_Aleman

    The_Aleman New Member

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    I use a shift kit, and all 3 chains are bicycle chains. They do stretch a little, but they hold up just fine til they get really worn out.

    Just about everyone with a shift kit uses bicycle chains.
     

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