recommended tools for chain adjustment?

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by ProDigit, Apr 11, 2013.

  1. ProDigit

    ProDigit New Member

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    Instead of having the chain hang there, tensioned by a chain tensioner, what tools can I use, to easily get a few links out of my chain?

    I probably will reduce the chain length to where it almost feels as tight as with a chain tensioner pulley.
     
  2. Groove

    Groove New Member

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    You can get a chain breaker at most hardware stores for about 15 bucks. Harbor Freight makes a good one, and the reason they're so cheap is because they're made by some poor schlub in a Chinese sweat shop.

    Otherwise, you can use a vice and a hammer and a smallish sized pin. I did that when I was too lazy to clean the garage and find my chain breaker. Ended up spending MORE time than if I were to have cleaned the garage and found the tool though.
     
  3. Legwon

    Legwon New Member

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    If you cannot afford a chain breaker,
    get a piece of 2x4 drill a hole into it the size of the pivot in the chain ... then lay the chain on top of it, make sure that the chain does not move, ... take a punch or a small screwdriver on top of the pivot and hit it with a hammer to punch the pivot out...
    grab the pivot from the OTHER side with vicegrips or plyers.. pull firmly... but DO NOT bend the chain.

    u will have to do this twice, in order to remove links....
    make sure the the 2 ends match up... or u may have to do it a third time.
     
  4. ocho ninja

    ocho ninja New Member

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    The most reliable set up I have used is running no tensioner on the motor chain side, or in other words getting the chain the right length were I can adjust it by using the dropouts on the bike... And a pedal chain tensioner on the other side
     
  5. ProDigit

    ProDigit New Member

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    I probably will use the chain tensioner (pulley) however I want it to work as least as possible, by cutting the chain to about the right length.
    It probably is impossible to get it perfect, but within a tolerance (just like 1 speed bicycles), it should be possible to give the chain very little play.
    Whatever play it has after getting it to the right length, I'll manipulate that with the chain tensioner pulley.
     
  6. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Just keep in mind that unless you resort to using a 1/2 link, you'll have to remove 2 links. You might be surprised how much 2 links will shorten the chain. If you remove too much you'll then end up with a chain that is too short and have to reassemble the links.

    Question: Does your bike have horizontal drop outs? Is it a single speed or does it use a derailer on the pedal side?

    I concur with Ocho Ninja. Get the engine drive chain right and tension the pedal chain. If you have coaster brakes the pedal chain tensioner needs to go on the top chain run, not the bottom because when braking all the stress will be on the bottom chain. A poorly designed or wrongly attached tensioner on the pedal side with coaster brakes could be dangerous. You might loose your brakes if it fails.

    Tom
     
  7. ProDigit

    ProDigit New Member

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    I use a regular beach cruiser, and will not use the pedal chain other than acceleration, and braking (coaster brakes).
     
  8. ocho ninja

    ocho ninja New Member

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    I have also seen people use the kit included tensioner on there pedal side chain when they have coaster brakes, it doesn't allow the chain to loosen under pressure like some of the regular spring loaded tensioners they sell at LBS
     

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