rear wheel drop down kickstand installation

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by boocher13, Sep 26, 2013.

  1. boocher13

    boocher13 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2013
    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm almost done with my first build and after doing a little cutting and grinding on the rear wheel stand I purchased from BB I noticed after getting everything back together the rear wheel still has some play,as if it isn't torqued down enough. I checked and double checked and torqued the snots out of the axle nuts to the point where I know they have enough torque. My question is; when installing one of these rear wheel kickstand should I have installed the stand on the outside of the axle nuts and used 2 other nuts to fasten it? The way I did it was I installed it on the axle stud (outside the frame obviously) then used the axle nut to torque everything down. I ran out of daylight or I'd still be out there trying to figure it out. On the bright side with the rear wheel off the ground I was able to sit on the bike and use the pedal to kickstart the bike. I managed to get it to idle for about 30 secs after about the 5th try,then I couldn't get her to run again.I took the fuel tank cap off because it seemed like the fuel wasn't siphoning from the tank properly,the line had a constant bubble in it after the filter. Could I have the filter upside down ?
     
  2. maniac57

    maniac57 Old, Fat, and still faster than you

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2011
    Messages:
    4,486
    Likes Received:
    3
    If your axle is tight and the wheel feels loose, your cone nuts need adjustment to tighten the bearings properly.
    Search wheel bearing adjustment.
     
  3. boocher13

    boocher13 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2013
    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the quick reply! this is a brand new bike but I know I did turn the very inner nuts a bit,mistakenly thinking I needed to loosen them for some reason. Then I came to my senses. I wrenched on them very slightly,but that could be the difference.This is a rear coaster brake hub if that makes a difference.
     
  4. maniac57

    maniac57 Old, Fat, and still faster than you

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2011
    Messages:
    4,486
    Likes Received:
    3
    Even a tiny bit of mis-adjustment in the bearings can destroy a wheel.
    Be sure its right before you ride it, especially at motor speeds.
     
  5. bluegoatwoods

    bluegoatwoods New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2012
    Messages:
    1,577
    Likes Received:
    0
    Maniac is right about those bearing adjustments.

    This is the voice of experience talking.

    If they're not adjusted right, they're toast.

    The good news is that it's not very hard at all. It would be a bit hard to describe in words. I won't try. But a youtube video or something like that will teach you what you need to know.
     
  6. caduceus

    caduceus New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2009
    Messages:
    173
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'll try it in words......I always adjust the wheel bearings a very slight bit looser at the cone nuts, so there's a barely detectable wobble. The act of tightening the axle nuts when installing the wheel should take up that wobble and leave the bearings in almost perfect adjustment. If there's still detectable wobble after tightening the axle nuts, remove the wheel and tighten the cone nuts very slightly and reinstall the wheel. You're looking for no wobble and totally free wheeling with the axle nuts tightened. (How'd I do BGW?)

    All that said, I setup the kickstand by mounting it separately from the axle. That big beefy axle looks inviting when you're trying to figure out a mount, but then every time you remove the rear wheel you have to remove the kickstand too. If you carefully drill a mounting hole in your drop outs, you can permanently install a 5/16" or 3/8" bolt to set up your rear-mounted kick stand.
     
    #6 caduceus, Sep 29, 2013
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2013
  7. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2012
    Messages:
    3,565
    Likes Received:
    58
    For coaster brake bikes with a motor, I like to leave a barely detectable clickiness in the bearing to allow for heat expansion when hitting the brake at 30+mph.
     
  8. fatdaddy

    fatdaddy New Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2011
    Messages:
    1,516
    Likes Received:
    0
    and getting a bearing too tight can fubar it also. I always leave it on the loose side just a little bit.A VERY LITTLE BIT. especially on a rear coaster brake wheel. coaster brakes get hot. USE real good high temp bearing grease on those bearings.
    fatdaddy.
     

Share This Page