Painting a brand new bike - quick question

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle Welding, Fabrication and Paintin' started by WaterDog, Sep 14, 2010.

  1. WaterDog

    WaterDog New Member

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    I have a new unassembled schwinn delmar coming. After wiping clean, can i simply apply several light coats of a good canned spray paint? Im not looking for show quality, but wondered if it would turn out ok. Also, what about the painted logos? I dont want to sand them because it would leave a different texture in those areas. Any advice?
     
  2. Kevlarr

    Kevlarr New Member

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    Before you repaint go over everything with a Scotchbrite pad to give the original paint a "tooth" for the new paint to grab onto.

    Also, most logos on bikes today aren't painted they're stickers and they will have to be removed before you paint.
     
  3. tvc15

    tvc15 New Member

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    This I great advise! If you don't have scotchbrite go with some mild steel wool. I use to work as VP of design at the worlds largest mass market bike company... In all my travels to China I don't think I ever saw a painted or permeant decal, peel or strip those puppies off or they will foul your paint and make you hate life:)
     
  4. BarelyAWake

    BarelyAWake New Member

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    #4 BarelyAWake, Sep 16, 2010
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2010
  5. Venice Motor Bikes

    Venice Motor Bikes Custom Builder / Dealer/Los Angeles

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    It's been my experience that spray paint will chip off very easy!! :(

    You're better off doing it right & maybe even having it powder coated for $100. (^)
     
  6. WaterDog

    WaterDog New Member

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    I looked closer and it looks like the decals are under a gloss coat of paint on the frame. I really dont want to remove the gloss coat to get to the decals because Im sure that would show up as a tecture difference in the final paint job. However I dont want the outline of the stickers by leaving them on. So im not sure at this point how to proceed.
     
  7. Kevlarr

    Kevlarr New Member

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    If you look even closer you may find that the gloss coat is just a clear decal. My Cranbrook had all the pinstripes covered with a clear sticker.
     
  8. KiM

    KiM New Member

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    Powdercoat is alot more durable yes, but quality of finish is not anywhere near that of a nice 2 pac paint job, you also get alot more colour choices with paint than powdercoat ...2 pac also sticks extremely well if you prep the surface your painting properly.

    KiM
     
  9. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Try a heat gun to remove the decals. They are usually the stick on type, not the water applied ones like model airplanes and cars use. Heat will loosen and soften the mylar and allow for easy removal. Often they will just peel off leaving no sticky residue. If any sticky stuff stays it can be removed with 3M adhesive remover, available at most hardware stores.
    As for surface prep after removing the decals; start with 380 grit sand paper, wet, and move down to 400. Use a primer compatible with the color coat and sand it after drying, also with 400. A decent paint job is possible with rattle cans but follow the can instructions as far as temperature/humidity and spraying distance. Send us some photos of your finished product.
    Tom

    Ooops, just realized how old this thread is. You have to wonder if the OP ever painted his bike.
     
    #9 2door, Sep 18, 2010
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2010
  10. WaterDog

    WaterDog New Member

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    Didnt occur to me to try a heat, thanks. I really hate to paint a brand new bike out of the box, but i think all this great advice will make it a class act. Ill be sure to post pictures.
     
  11. tvc15

    tvc15 New Member

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    I bought a new (used) bike today, it was covered with 4 layers of flaking paint, deals, mold, gum, rust and 53 years of gunk... after 1/2 our of dissection and 2 hours of paint remover I have the perfect foundation for new color...

    if you want it done right it is going to cost you some elbow grease, time and psychic energy for sure.
     
  12. tvc15

    tvc15 New Member

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    Here is said bicycle...
     

    Attached Files:

  13. WaterDog

    WaterDog New Member

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    Very nice, i think thats a great start. Look quite similar to my new frame. I wanted to start my build with a black frame, which would be quite easy since it is brand new. But the rims are the same color as the bike and are electric blue. There no way i could paint the rims because i am installed side pull brakes which would take the paint off in no time. Soooo after careful thought, i am going to keep the original electric blue paint job and add blue flames to the black gas tank as well as paint a few engine components blue (the engine is a black slant). I think ill get the best of both worlds...a new factory paint job with enough customization to make it my own. And the more i think about it, black and blue sorta goes with a MB if you get my drift..lol
     
  14. Maxvision

    Maxvision New Member

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    No matter what kind of paint you use (powder coat, automotive, rattle can) you're always going to get scratchs and dings. Rattle can paint is GREAT for bikes, can always do touch up work with a little paint brush (spray a little paint in the paint can cap to dip your brush in) or mask and spray.

    If you have a really deep scratch or chip you can spray or brush on some primer (usually has more paint solids to it and drys fast), sand with a scrubby pad or 320 grit paper then spray on your color. Probably take a couple coats of your color to completely cover the primer.

    To minimize the "orange peel" effect with rattle can paint, run the can under hot water for a little while before spraying.

    If you want that really BRIGHT shine, after the paint drys, rub it out with some rubbing compound.

    Only draw back is the rattle can paint doesn't hold up to gasoline. I always put a rag around my gas tank spout when putting gas in yet there's still always a drop that splashes somewhere. A little rubbing compound will put the shine right back.
     
    #14 Maxvision, Sep 19, 2010
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2010
  15. KiM

    KiM New Member

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    before spraying any colour make sure you use ETCH PRIMER! most important if you want the paint to stick well to your frame....

    Best of luck

    KiM
     
  16. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    As far as fuel proofing your paint, I've had very good luck with Top Flite Lustrcoat model airplane clear. It protects and is gasoline, alcohol and nitromethane resistant. It also gives a nice gloss if you take the time and sand with 4 or 600 between coats. A little rubbing with compound and a light buff afterwards and you'll have a show quality paint job.
    Tom
     

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