Pacific Stratus

Preston L

New Member
Sep 17, 2013
8
0
1
Utah, United States
I recently motorized a pacific stratus mountain bike. The carb did not fit and instead of ordering an offset intake manifold I just cut a section of the frame out. I know it's not safe but I figured the motor being pinched in the V would be able to hold the bike together pretty well, so I went with it. I loved being able to cruise around town or commute on a sip of gas. I decided it was time to start over and sold the bike for $300. A new Huffy Cranbrook and Grubee SkyHawk are being shipped to me right now. Can't wait to start putting it together. I will try to attach a picture of the bike I sold.
 

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sactownie

New Member
Jul 20, 2013
23
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0
sacramento ca
Wow that photo makes me cringe just looking at it! I hope you wrote out a disclaimer to the buyer that he signed?

I recently motorized a pacific stratus mountain bike. The carb did not fit and instead of ordering an offset intake manifold I just cut a section of the frame out. I know it's not safe but I figured the motor being pinched in the V would be able to hold the bike together pretty well, so I went with it. I loved being able to cruise around town or commute on a sip of gas. I decided it was time to start over and sold the bike for $300. A new Huffy Cranbrook and Grubee SkyHawk are being shipped to me right now. Can't wait to start putting it together. I will try to attach a picture of the bike I sold.
 

2door

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 15, 2008
16,335
143
63
Littleton, Colorado
Compromising a main structural frame member is not a good idea. There are far better ways to do it. That frame is doomed to failure. I hope you have covered yourself against any liability as the builder/seller of that bike.

In the future please explore your options. Injuries related to motorized bicycles will not do the hobby any good and could result in less than favorable attention to us.

Tom
 

Preston L

New Member
Sep 17, 2013
8
0
1
Utah, United States
I originally intended to weld a bracket in the cut section to go over the carburetor, but never got around to it. I would not have sold it, but the buyer was in great need of transportation to work and back, and yes. I did have him sign a bill of sale and a disclaimer. Thank you for your input, I was unaware that cutting frame would compromise the structural integrity of the bike to such a degree, and I can assure you now that I know I will not do it again.
 

MotorBicycleRacing

Well-Known Member
Jul 28, 2010
5,845
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SoCal Baby!!!
www.facebook.com
I would not have sold it, but the buyer was in great need of transportation to work and back, and yes. I did have him sign a bill of sale and a disclaimer.
His signing of a disclaimer is absolutely zero protection for you against a lawsuit if your frame butchery causes an accident. :)

You would still get sued and he would probably win any lawsuit against you.
the bill of sale just makes the case easier for them.
 

FMB42

New Member
Sep 27, 2013
107
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Idaho
Please do the right thing by contacting the buyer and insisting that he return the bike for a full refund.
 

Preston L

New Member
Sep 17, 2013
8
0
1
Utah, United States
Thanks for all of your helpful advice, but I doubt he will sue me if he is injured on the bike as he is a close friend. I would feel terrible though. I have strongly advised him to weld a steel tube from the cut frame to the seat post to which he agreed. The bike frame is steel so this will be easy.
 

2door

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 15, 2008
16,335
143
63
Littleton, Colorado
Good move, Preston. Make sure whoever welds it knows what he's doing. A bad weld is not much better than no weld and that is such a critical part being replaced.

Tom
 

biknut

Well-Known Member
Sep 28, 2010
6,525
229
63
Dallas
I wouldn't worry too much about it. Everyone on this forum that's ever sold a motor bicycle to someone is in the same boat, because even if you didn't modify the frame, any bicycle frame is subject to catastrophic failure from having a cheap vibrating chinese gas motor attached to it. That's one of the reasons the kits come with a big 44T sprocket to keep the top speed down to a reasonable mph. Adding smaller sprockets that allow 40 plus mph makes the situation a lot worse. Riding any 2 wheel cycle is subject to risk. Whenever you ride, death always rides along with you. The same can be said for just getting out of bed in the morning.
 

Will122391

New Member
May 31, 2013
90
0
0
Texas
It's $10 for one of those manifolds... Having that section taken out means that thing will never be able to offroad safely.
 

sactownie

New Member
Jul 20, 2013
23
0
0
sacramento ca
Yea i wouldnt trust it for going down my driveway!
Huffy bikes are made of really crappy steel, I doubt it can even be welded. I had a Murray Baja in the early 80s that got welded 4 times in the same place then it was determined it was junk and the welds would just keep breaking.
I was like 13 years old then, I think the bike shop guy just was feeling sorry for me why he tried to weld it 4 times.
Do yourself a favor and buy a "bike shop" quality bike off craigslist for $25-75. look for a full chromoly frame. I found one for $75, my current ride and a $25 one my nephews current ride.
 
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Ratt_Bones

New Member
Aug 2, 2013
153
0
0
Appleton, Wi.
I recently motorized a pacific stratus mountain bike. The carb did not fit and instead of ordering an offset intake manifold I just cut a section of the frame out. I know it's not safe but I figured the motor being pinched in the V would be able to hold the bike together pretty well, so I went with it. I loved being able to cruise around town or commute on a sip of gas. I decided it was time to start over and sold the bike for $300. A new Huffy Cranbrook and Grubee SkyHawk are being shipped to me right now. Can't wait to start putting it together. I will try to attach a picture of the bike I sold.
Oh wow................