Okay if it were your money...

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by badgerking, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. badgerking

    badgerking New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2011
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have managed to save about $800 to build a motorized bicycle. I have also thought about buying one of the complete bike/motor kits.

    I'm pretty mechanically inclined, can weld, and fabricate if needed but would prefer not to spend lots of time building or fixing an old frame.

    I've looked at the Felt bikes and I really like them but are there any others I should be considering? Is there a good, reliable source for the motor kits? Oh, and I will be sticking with a 50cc or smaller motor because my wife doesn't have a motorcycle license and she's said she would like to ride it too.

    If it were your money, what would you get and why?
     
  2. Venice Motor Bikes

    Venice Motor Bikes Custom Builder / Dealer/Los Angeles

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2008
    Messages:
    6,228
    Likes Received:
    32
    I personally think the Felts are the nicest modern bikes out there to motorize... Old American made Schwinns also make awesome (& solid) MB's! (But i think you all could've guessed that I would say that.) ;)
     
  3. matthurd

    matthurd New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2010
    Messages:
    817
    Likes Received:
    0
    my worksman is solid as a rock. absolutely the best rims+spokes iv'e ever seen on a bicycle.

    they are a bit of work but in new york theres worksman trikes that were made into hotdog stands from the 60's still operational, tells ya something about the quality right? really nice steel frames. since you got $800 saved pick up the front drum break for another $90.

    pair it up with a sprocket adapter from either manic mechanic, or sportscarpat when he starts selling his version (if you use pat's you wont have to bend a coaster break arm since his bolts are countersunk, and with both of them you wont have to grind down your dustcap which is nice), regardless i'd say avoid the kit sprockets on a worksman cause kit bolts are too short for such beefy spokes, you'll spend $10 or so just on longer bolts (sprockets+adapter made for that specific hub are like $70 shipped), and the rag joints are hard to install just right.

    i have a grubee GT-5 and i didnt get to ride much but it felt real nice, everyone says the grubee GT-4 starfires are better though (i think thats the 66cc starfire, not sure what a 48cc version is named), motor kit is like $180 shipped i think, although that was a GT-5, idk about the GT-4 but i think it would be similar.

    so $180 for the motor my bike was $50 shipping and a base model with fenders is $329, 90 for the front drum break so $419+50+180= $649+sprocket adapter is like 70 so $719ish, could even maybe pick up an expansion chamber with what you had left, and that would be a really nice bike :)

    the bike does need a few mods though, mainly cut off 1 chain guard mount on the seat tube (i did this with a dremel), and washers between the hub and drop outs to get more clearance. dust cap mod and bend the break arm out a bit if you use a rag joint (which i wouldn't recommend, mine was a nightmare), and i had to move the rear wheel a bit more towards the right of the axle for extra clearance, would be easier with a good chain tensioner, but i didn't want to use one because again, headaches.

    good luck choosing a build :)

    edit: also regardless of what bike you pick, if it has fenders scrap the front. http://www.google.com/cse?cx=partne...nder&sa=Search&siteurl=motorbicycling.com/f3/

    and if mountain bikes are your thing you could do a jack shaft, just get a bike with a horizontal frame, so you'll have enough clearance for a motor. jackshafts move your chain drive from the left of the bike to the right side and the through your traditional pedaling set up (meaning if you have a multi gear bike you've essentially created a transmission and have a wide array of gears to use for various applications more speed, climbing hills, a mix of both etc.)
     
    #3 matthurd, Feb 28, 2011
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2011
  4. badgerking

    badgerking New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2011
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    I hadn't looked at the Worksman bicycles but I like the idea of buying American. I will definitely have to take a look at them now.
     
  5. matthurd

    matthurd New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2010
    Messages:
    817
    Likes Received:
    0
    another thing if you get a worksman is order it with the 36 tooth chainring, 44 is too big for mounting. can't remember if it was bairdco or goat herder that taught me that but i'm glad one of em did cause i wouldn't have known any better with out them pointing it out.

    lots of people gave me tips on how to build a worksman though, as well as lots of experience from building my own, hopefully i didn't miss any other big details about how to build up a worksman.

    anyways just noticed your post count, so welcome to the forums :D
     
  6. badgerking

    badgerking New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2011
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the welcome. I've been lurking for awhile as a guest but now that I've saved up the cash, I figured it would be wise to tap into the knowledge base. I'm pretty excited. I used to ride a lot years ago and I think this will be a fun way to get back into commuting on a bicycle, now that I'm older and more lazy.
     
  7. sportscarpat

    sportscarpat Bonneville Bomber the Salt Flat record breaker

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2009
    Messages:
    1,752
    Likes Received:
    66
    Worksman also offers a 28t sprocket, but the 36t works fine with a China two stroke.
     
  8. matthurd

    matthurd New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2010
    Messages:
    817
    Likes Received:
    0
    didn't know that, do they charge extra for it? the 36 tooth was a free option which was nice.
     
  9. sportscarpat

    sportscarpat Bonneville Bomber the Salt Flat record breaker

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2009
    Messages:
    1,752
    Likes Received:
    66
    When I order complete crank assemblies I specify either the 28t or 36t. Never saw any price difference. The only reason I use the 28t is for the bigger engines where I mount the motor forward and down in my drop loop frames, otherwise the 36t is fine.
     
  10. matthurd

    matthurd New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2010
    Messages:
    817
    Likes Received:
    0
    yeah i don't see anyone really needing a 28 for the chinese kits, nice to know the option is there though.
     
  11. 5-7HEAVEN

    5-7HEAVEN Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2008
    Messages:
    2,364
    Likes Received:
    38
    Here's my take:
    Find a good used quality bike with front suspension fork on craigslist, American if you like. Pay less than $100. Pick a reputable engine kit and install it. Upgrade to dual brakes, strong 12-gauge rear spokes.
    This is your first build. Learn from it, work all the bugs out of it, then give it to your wife.
    Then repeat the process for your better second build.
    You should be able to build two bikes for $800.dance1dance1
     
  12. matthurd

    matthurd New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2010
    Messages:
    817
    Likes Received:
    0
    5-7s idea isn't bad either.

    i picked up a 20' GT performer for $70 on craigslist 4 years ago and the bike still rides great, and iv'e seen tons of other decent/really nice bikes at very reasonable prices.

    but a pair of worksman wheels retail for like $180 by themselves, have 11 gauge spokes, and really solid steel rims, thats why i went with them after much debate.
     
  13. NunyaBidness

    NunyaBidness Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2008
    Messages:
    1,062
    Likes Received:
    1
    OK you asked for it.
    If it were my $800 I would put some into a tune up on the bike i currently have. Suspension forks and v-brakes front and back. SBP shift kit and expansion chamber exhaust and a new seat. I be ridin' in high style then. Oh yeah, I'd probably paint it as well and my bike would be pretty as well as fast and fun.
     
  14. chainmaker

    chainmaker New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2010
    Messages:
    2,597
    Likes Received:
    1
    This is definitely the way to go!! Find a nice old cruiser or whatever bike you like and re-build it from the groung up.
     
  15. LS614

    LS614 Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2009
    Messages:
    1,236
    Likes Received:
    0
    I second that, I was going to say get an EZ kit or a morini, but no, do what they said, build two bikes, it will teach you so much more :)
    -LS
     

Share This Page