Need advice...Great site lots of info...

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by Slick Vixen, Mar 24, 2009.

  1. Slick Vixen

    Slick Vixen New Member

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    ...I am new to this "concept" and this is the place to learn...alternatively get a little confused as well. (I know this has been asked in many forms but the answers seem to skirt the issue a bit.) I'm new to "motorized bicycles" for many reasons, retro appeal etc..but I would like to start from the perspective that I dont want a regular "moped" like the Tomos or others...I want a frame mounted motorized bicycle, (to resemble the early board track bikes), I want to commute at least 30 miles round trip 3-4 days a week @ 30 mph avg speed (up to 40-45 to accelerate), I weigh 200lbs and will be carrying a courrier bag w/me: specifically do I want a 2 or 4 stroke, how many CC's, and who makes the kit for me to start my build....please I've overthought this to exhaustion and need direction...
     
  2. Sydneysider

    Sydneysider New Member

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    Welcome Slick Vixen, I'll do my best to help you out. Good luck in finding answers you need and have fun!
     
  3. wheelbender6

    wheelbender6 Active Member

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    Welcome to the forum. It's probably better that we tell you what we have and how well it works for us, rather than advising you on what to buy.
    I have a 48cc 2 stroke frame-mounted on a chromo mountain bike. It carries my 200lb body on a 50 mile round trip commute at well over 100 mpg. However, AZ law limits me to 20mph (unless I want to get a tag, MC license and ride in the traffic lanes).

    If you want to go 45mph, I would get a sprocket the bolts to a rear disk brake hub or use a hi-hat sprocket adapter on a rear disk wheel. It is difficult to install a clamp-on rear sprocket without some wobble. That wobble gets scary above 30mph.
    Good luck
     
  4. Slick Vixen

    Slick Vixen New Member

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    ...thanks for the input, it clarifies something I saw in a diagram on one of the sites....thanks
     
  5. Slick Vixen

    Slick Vixen New Member

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    ...one of the issues I am "overthinking" is the 2 stroke 4 stroke dilema, the second is I keep coming across the Chinese engines as being unreliable and the 2 stroke 49 cc engines almost all seem to be made in China. So my thinking has been towards a 4 stroke as far as reliability, low maintenence and stopping for gas without having to mix...Is thera 49 cc, 4 stoke frame mounted kit that is not Chinese made?
     
  6. MB-Monkey

    MB-Monkey New Member

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    i have heard many complaints over the gear boxes on in frame 4 strokes you could go with a rack mount if you want reliability of a 4 stroke. I put many miles on my inframe 2 stroke once you get the failure points out of the kit they do pretty well i ride mine for transportation.
     
  7. Slick Vixen

    Slick Vixen New Member

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    My ultimate goal here goes beyond the personal requirements I listed...I would ultimately like to identify an engine kit, a strong steel frame with the neccessary upgrades to make available a "motorized bike complete" for a market overseas. The issues of reliability are paramount, steep inclines and long decents (great brakes) and ease of repair and parts availibility...I already have access to this market and the fact that this is "green" transportation and relatively inexpensive (accessable) makes this an awesome product to provide....Obviously if I could wade through the discrepancies and find the best overall combo of performance and value I would need a reliable supplier of both kits, upgrades and parts and preferably the frame supplier as well....my personal requirements are not neccessarily those of the end product but are a starting point and my personal prototype if you will....any addl. thoughts
     
  8. eDJ

    eDJ New Member

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    Just curious Slick Vixen, how much mechanical experience do you have and will you
    have tools to work on and service your motor bike ? Will you have someone
    available who could help with this ?

    A 4 cycle motor may require you to adjust the valves occasionally, where a 2 cycle
    doesn't have valves. Likewise with changing oil in the crankcase. 2 cycle engines
    don't require oil changes like the 4 cycles. The 2 cycles are considered by many to
    be more care free overall where the 4 cycles may weigh more, require more periodic
    maintenance but have a longer lifespan. Still the 2 cycle motors are reporting as much
    as 15,000 miles before they are worn out. Most of these motors are using CDI ignitions now
    so you won't have to know how to replace points and condensor and adjusting the timing each
    tune up, leaving only the periodic adjustment of the spark plug gap.

    The 2 cycle engines are light & powerful for their size not to mention relatively inexpensive.
    The kits will provide about everything you need and should you have a total engine failure
    a replacement motor (just the motor only) may cost $80+ dollars. There are recoil start
    attachments available (like a lawnmower has) and a centrifugal clutch kit too to make riding
    more like having an automatic transmission. (so you can pedal the bike to get it rolling and
    then apply power for a smooth take off)

    The 3 most consistant CON's about these 2 cycle Chinese frame mount motors I've read here
    in the last 8 months are: 1) replace the chain that comes with it with a higher quality chain,
    as the OEM's are prone to breaking. 2) Replace the sparkplug wire with a higher quality ignition
    wire. (you can buy it by the foot at NAPA auto supply) 3) the chain tensioner "idler" tends to be a weak design and source of chain failure, so consider a better after market tensioner. These
    suggestions are things "I" would definately do myself to have a safe dependable bike with a
    much lower breakdown ratio.

    It may be wise, if you have a regular car, to have a bumper mounted bicycle rack where you
    could transport the bike with the car. Should you break down too far from home to pedal back
    or find yourself in changing weather, you could leave the bike somewhere safe, get a ride to your car, come back and
    mount the bike to the car and continue on home.

    No matter how much you've read about the motors, kits, and bicycle designs it's prudent to
    know Florida's laws (assuming your "Miami" is in Florida) so it can be your best counsel as
    to what is allowed & legal where you live.

    Florida moped laws

    All the states laws:

    Moped Laws by state
     
  9. Slick Vixen

    Slick Vixen New Member

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    ...for myself I have enough experience and skill to be able to follow instructions, generally I am a resonably skilled do-it-yourselfer...some of the things you guys discusss on this forum are way above my comprehension, I am a good troubleshooter, I have built many bicycles (current) and a few mini bikes back in the day....its definitely a hobby/interest that I am going to imerse myself in, I cant tell you how "happy" I was when I first found this site and subsequent sites on the internet.....as far as the further goal goes the market I see for this is one that is dear to my heart....it is not a huge commercial market, the people are relatively poor and disposable income is limited....it is a country where people take great pride in there things and a motorized bicycle would greatly benefit them, as well as being a "green" form of transport, which is very important......however my first concern is to find the right "machine" for me and then assess its value as a form of transport to others later... by the way I am refering to Dominica and Grenada in the Caribbean wher I have family...and I think these motorized bikes would be awesome....
     
  10. Slick Vixen

    Slick Vixen New Member

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    ...i'll tell you wher I'm lost the most is the jump off/strating point 2 or 4??? I cant get a fix on this issue...
     
  11. dvddtz

    dvddtz New Member

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    Hey Slick Vixen,Welcome. I have no experience with the four stroke kits, but I have almost 600 miles on my 48cc 2- stroke,and am very pleased overall.The only mods I have made are I replaced the plug and wire and got a inline fuel filter,all other parts are stock. I ride about 15-20 miles a day..rd.
     
  12. eDJ

    eDJ New Member

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    Recently I showed this adaption of a motorized bicycle pickup truck to some friends at
    church. Some of the missionary outreach people were immediately engrossed with it
    seeing it as solution for the needs of a community in Peru that they are active in. The only
    thing I don't like about the design is the motor placement and long sprocket chain to the pedals.
    Would the villagers be able to maintain it to keep it dependable. I'd rather have a friction drive
    motor over the front wheel that has enough power to move it along with a load. (I don't believe
    motor displacement or hp will be a problem where they are wanting to deliver some of these)

    Some other solutions for assisting with bulk transportation of farm produce in third world areas
    would be the powered wagon which would use a drive similar to what trikes use. A 4 cycle
    motor would set where the X is located and a centrifugal clutch would drive the trailer. The
    throttle cable and kill switch would reach the seat post thru the trailer tongue and mount near
    the seat. Ideally a seat safety switch where you have to be seated to complete the circut
    would serve as the kill switch. In emergency the opperator could stand up on the pedals to lift
    up off the seat and kill the motor) This would only require a bicycle without any other
    modifications in order to haul some freight. Sketched is only the base frame but a plywood box
    would mount to it with a shroud to enclose the motor. The right front corner would have openings
    to vent outside air over the motor much like an RV uses for it's aux generator.

    [​IMG]

    If you remember the "mini bikes" with the Briggs & Stratton engines then this propulsion unit could
    answer some needs. It's from Dran'n'fly.org But if people had servicable bikes then these motor
    units could be made available. I could see using a cylindrical fuel tank above the rear wheel where
    the gas cap is on the opposite side of the motor's exhaust. This would leave the top of the frame
    ready for a larger open basket so small units of produce or freight could be carried. Even a cooler
    with fresh fish & seafood, or meds that require refrigeration. But in the trailer and Drag'n'fly
    power units a 4 cycle motor could be used that has a readily available parts and service outlets available in that part of the world.

    I'm guessing that in a third world environment that the Dran'n'fly concept would be the most viable.
    Those with regular bikes could get around by peddling or using a Chinese frame mount motor. If they
    had a standard bike these trailers or minibike basket units could be available, or for rent like the U-Haul trailers. With a safety seat cover that contains the kill switch and a clamp on throttle lever the units could offer a solution to the occasional need for bulk transportation of items too heavy for
    their personal transportation but yet too small for commercial truck freight delivery.

    But yes, I've given this some thought too. .cargo
     

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  13. Sydneysider

    Sydneysider New Member

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    4 strokes are a bit more complicated, although you have to bother with mixing oil with gas I still like the mechanical simplicity and power of a 2 stroke engine..
    ya just gotta love that tang tang tang sound!
     
  14. Slick Vixen

    Slick Vixen New Member

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    Thanks so much for all the advice...I am considering, based on what I've learned so far...2 stroke seems 2 be the way to go for now...the basket Ideas are a new venue and great idea....thanks again I'll be lurking and hopefully posting on my progress soon....Thank You!
     
  15. Dave31

    Dave31 Moderator
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    Welcome to the forum Slick Vixen, glad you joined us.
     
  16. ferball

    ferball New Member

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    I know the post is old, but just my experience with "third world" countries. Go with an inframe two stroke. I did some time in one and knew few mechanics, and one of the things they told me which I found quite ironic is that when someone out of country does the family a favor and sends them a car it sometimes does not turn out well, reason being is that new cars from the states have all sorts of computer controled crap, and the environmental stuff that makes repair very expensive, and in some cases next to impossible. The typical mechanic in one of those countries works on anything that you will pay him for, and he ussually will not have a high tech shop, I would say that most guys on this forum have a better tooled shop than a third world mechanic, but they are crazy when it comes to inventiveness, (Duct tape and a tuna can to fix a Sesna) So a two stroke in its simplicity and practicality would be awesome in one of those countries. not to mention that you would not have to worry about the bike end, as there is usually a ton of sturdy old school bikes in those countries. Just as an example of two vs four...My buddy has a friction drive 4 it has not run all summer, his carb has a small broken piece of plastic that renders it in operable not to mention he has yet to get the friction drive set properly to not chew through tires or rollers., I rebuilt my carb the other day sitting on a curb....
     
  17. Slick Vixen

    Slick Vixen New Member

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    Thanks for the info...yes it is an old post...but still something I am working on.
    I have a boat in the Grenadines that when I shipped it down it had twin racing Mercury outboard engines, fuel injected, etc and the first time I needed to get them worked on I couldn't...in short I ended up buying two NOS Yamaha carbureted engines as replacements and selling off the Mercs to a shipyard. Thanks Again.
     
  18. jbcruisin

    jbcruisin Active Member

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    Where in the Grenadines is your boat?? My wife & I lived in LaBorie, Grenada. We still go back to visit. We love the culture there & the laid back atmosphere. I'm a 4 stroke guy & love it. I put many miles on my bike & all the maintenance I do is change oil every 300 miles.
     

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