Need a few Painting Tips

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle Welding, Fabrication and Paintin' started by Junster, Oct 29, 2009.

  1. Junster

    Junster New Member

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    Hi I got a yamaha enduro 60 tank for my bike. I have it sanded down to bare metal. I'm getting ready to bondo in some dings etc in it. That part isn't to hard. I just wanted to know about any metal prep before I start primering it. Maybe best spray can primer? I planned on using Krylon black for the base color and after that trying to mask up something not ugly. Any easy shortcuts for pinstriping?

    sandedTank.JPG
     
  2. bairdco

    bairdco a guy who makes cool bikes

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    wipe the bare metal tank down with denatured alcohol and a lint free towel to clean it before painting. then any kinda good primer should be fine.

    most importantly, get some gas-resistant clear lacquer that's compatible with your paint, or else spilled gas will ruin all your custom work.
     
  3. Venice Motor Bikes

    Venice Motor Bikes Custom Builder / Dealer/Los Angeles

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    Engine paint is gas resistant.
     
  4. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Hey Junster,
    Just a word of advice. DupliColor paint is great stuff and comes in almost any color you could want. However, their clear is not gasoline resistant. Look for an engine enamel clear or go to an automotive paint supplier for a good clear coat.
    As for masking, try vinyl electrical tape. It forms well to compound curves and makes good clean lines. For tight corners you can slice it into thin strips and it will conform to very tight curves. Hope this helps and please send us some pictures of the finished tank.
    Tom
     
  5. skjjoe

    skjjoe Member

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    Tom is right on the paint. Go slow, small amounts of paint, and wet sand with very fine sand paper in between coats,say 600 g. let it dry at least 24 hours in between coats. I use a polish compound after the last coat.=very shiny paint job
    oh any automotive primer first don't forget to wet sand that too
     
    #5 skjjoe, Oct 29, 2009
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2009
  6. Venice Motor Bikes

    Venice Motor Bikes Custom Builder / Dealer/Los Angeles

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    Hobby shops sell very thin pinstriping masking tape!
     
  7. Hardly Davidson

    Hardly Davidson New Member

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    nice post most people don't know ...............like colour changing paint is not gas resistant ................doh!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  8. Venice Motor Bikes

    Venice Motor Bikes Custom Builder / Dealer/Los Angeles

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    Are you trying to say engine paint isn't gas resistant??? (I've sure found it to be!!)
     
  9. Hardly Davidson

    Hardly Davidson New Member

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    engine paint is................color changing aint...................hence the doh!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  10. sanchtech

    sanchtech New Member

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    Not sure if you have a da but if you do great. I'd softpad da it with 80 grit going slow, then 180 grit to cancel out your 80 grit scratches. If you leave scratches that are too deep you'll regret it when priming. Then I'd prime a few coats of "high build" Medallion Dual prime if you insist on rattlecan. Overlap your strokes by 50% and keep a nice even speed with your spray straight on at the distance recommended. Also let it flash a good 5 minutes in between coats. Then let it cure for a few hours or a day. Then spray a flat black rattle can on it to pepper it to use as a guide coat and once the pepper spray is gone you know you've sanded it evenly. I'd wet sand with 600 and a soft block. Watch your edges or anything digging.

    If you do this as a hobby I'd go get a cheap $50 gun if I were you or those compressorless guns(presto).
    gasoline and rattlecan don't go well and that's cause there's no hardener and being acrylic enamel. Ppg Omni is cheap and your clear will last a long time if you're just spraying bikes. In any case, once your primer is wetsanded you can use denatured alcohol to clean and spray, using flashtimes for everything you spray between coats. You also spray your clear coat to a semi cured base, so let it flash for around 45 min before clearing. Also, if you never wetsanded and buffed before I'd have second thoughts doing that on a round tank with fresh clear for the firsttime.
     
  11. Tim_B_172

    Tim_B_172 New Member

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    I always use automotive spray paint. Duplicolor brand is what's available at my nearest auto parts store and it does a fine job for rattle can paint. Of course it isn't as good as using a professional spray gun, but it's also a LOT cheaper.

    Like everyone else said, wet sand between coats. I usually sand after the primer and then prime and sand again. Normally that will fill all of the scratches, sanding marks etc. but if need be you can sand the finish coats too. It's not always necessary but sometimes it is. Start with 400 grit, then go to 600, and then 800. clear coat and then some turtle wax when you're done for extra protection and shine.

    2Door, thanks for that info, I didn't know that the duplicolor clear coat wasn't gas resistant. I'm planning on making a fiberglass gas tank soon, over the winter maybe. Guess I'll have to find some other clear coat.
     

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