motorized bike only starts with starter fluid

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by kbazzy, Mar 11, 2015.

  1. kbazzy

    kbazzy New Member

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    Yesterday I started up my motorized bike for the first time and I had to use starter fluid because it was giving me some trouble which doesn't happen on my other bikes. But I said maybe cause the engine is still new. Well I got it started and I rode it for 15 minutes about. Then today I went to start it and it wouldn't start. So put some fluid and it started right away. Please I need help. Should I ride it more to get it warmed up ????
     
  2. GoreWound

    GoreWound New Member

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    is it cold where you are?
    cold air + new engine = not easy to start.

    this is pretty normal, and what the starter fluid is for. it should get easier as the engine breaks in and the air warms up.
     
  3. kbazzy

    kbazzy New Member

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    Well its only like 40 outside and about 30 in my garage which is pretty damn warm to us in michigan. But ya that's a good point that I never thought of. Thanks
     
  4. maniac57

    maniac57 Old, Fat, and still faster than you

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    Did you try using the choke lever? It's there for cold starting.
     
  5. kbazzy

    kbazzy New Member

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    My choke lever is always down
     
  6. Eric2.0

    Eric2.0 New Member

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    I've always wondered if these engines, when new, are built so tight that they just cannot rotate under compression and nothing happens. My old Stinger SD wouldn't fire even after a mag change, carb change....everything....It kinda acted too tight IMO.
     
  7. bluegoatwoods

    bluegoatwoods Active Member

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    That might be your entire trouble. No happy time engine that I've ever had would start at 30 or 40 degrees without choking.

    Try flipping that choke lever up for starting. She might want no choke quite quickly or she might want you to keep that lever up for a little while. They seem to vary a bit on that.
     
  8. Davezilla

    Davezilla New Member

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    Try starting the engine with the choke... it should fire right up after it's been run a few times.
    My next question is are you running your gas/oil ratio at 16:1? If so, that can make the engine hard to start even on a warm day, 16:1 is just way too much oil and it's safe to break in the engine at 32:1 or whatever ratio you prefer to run after break in.
    Most people run 40:1 once broken in and some of us use a little more oil like 32:1, and some of us run as high as 100:1 using Opti2 or Amsoil.
    If you are running 16:1 right now, switch up to at least 24:1 and it'll start a lot easier and not be so messy, but it's safe to break in at 32:1 or even 40:1
     
  9. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Try using the choke and if you have the NT carburetor you can try a three second shot with the tickler button. That button simply sinks the float and overfills the carb for a rich condition that can make cold starts easier.

    Pedal up to about 10 MPH, release the clutch lever and keep pedaling until the engine starts. Disengage the clutch and let the engine run a few seconds, giving it a little throttle then open the choke. If you have good ignition the engine should start and run properly using this method.
    If it starts using starter fluid you just need to find that 'sweet spot' where the engine starts easily. It might take some experimentation but eventually you'll discover what your engine wants/needs to start without using any outside aids.

    What spark plug gap are you using? .024 to .028 is a good starting point with a stock engine and most plugs. You can play with the gap later to see what works best.
    Good luck.

    Tom
     
  10. donphantasmo

    donphantasmo Member

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    I don't know why, but I am willing to be you have a leak somewhere.

    Use the choke, get it running less than a minute, then turn the choke off. Also, since it's so cold up there, the air will be more dense. So, re-jetting might have to be redone, to compensate for the ridiculous amount of cold air.
     
  11. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Good thought, Don. No body has asked if the engine runs with the choke on or if it idles fast. An air (vacuum) leak will impact starting, especially cold starts.

    Some other thoughts: The fuel petcock should be closed when the bike is parked. Most float valves will seep if only a little over time and flood the engine.

    Poor electrical connections in the spark plug boot, normal with the kit boot, can also make for hard starts.

    Just food for thought.

    Tom
     

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