Micargi Huntington: learning experience.

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by Allen_Wrench, Mar 9, 2010.

  1. Allen_Wrench

    Allen_Wrench Resident Mad Scientist

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    I've learned a few things through building on the Huntington. I wanted to share somewhat hard-earned enlightenment with anybody here who wants to consider the Huntington as an MB platform.
    One of the first things I learned is that the springer fork from Spookey Tooth will fit the Huntington headtube, being 1 inch diameter. Since other springers I saw were also a standard 1 inch dia., I imagine they would also fit. BUT: the front tube on the Huntington that accepts the springer headtube is SHORTER IN LENGTH than on most other bikes. If you trim the springer headtube too much, your spring mount (angle iron?) won't line up with the bolt that runs through the spring to the big U-shaped bracket out front. A spacer of the proper diameter and length is really the best option in this case, in addition to trimming the fork headtube only slightly. Measure as often as you need to, to be certain.
    The downtube up front is bigger than the seatpost tube. The frame is steel but, for some reason, I just don't feel good about drilling the frame. You'll need a good aftermarket oversize-frame motor mount for in front. In the pics section, under the title "was a Huntington", you might be able to see my solution. I tend to overbuild things a tad. Mine is a four-bolt saddle shaped pipe clamp up front. It uses the standard ThatsDax motor clamp in back, which is itself overbuilt. Locknuts all 'round. The motor's going nowhere.
    The top tube (often referred to as the "nutcracker") is oddly shaped, presenting a problem for mounting the tank. One idea is to get a cooler aftermarket tank or old motorcycle tank. Because the top tube's cross-section near the front/headtube is more that of a vertical oval and near the seat it is more of an horizontal oval, I decided to do some metal fabbing. I took a strip of thin brass and wrapped it around the top tube where the front tank bracket would go. Same for the rear bracket. These acted as templates to form heavier steel brackets that are big enough to wrap around the frame.
    I am currently working on a braced chain guide. I will let you know how that goes.
     
  2. BDW

    BDW New Member

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    Thanks for the info in your two posts about the huntington. I decided to go with the huntington as well, while it will not be elaborate as yours I like the look of the bike. I have started installing the engine and made a creative u-bolt situation for the front mount that may or may not stay.

    Right now I am at the installing the sprocket and chain stage. It looks like you cut your fender which makes sense that will need to be done. I put the sprocket on with the rubber all inside the spokes. But it looks like the chain is going to rub on the tire just a little bit. Did you encounter this problem? Did you space the sprocket out some how?

    Thanks
     
  3. Allen_Wrench

    Allen_Wrench Resident Mad Scientist

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    What I did with the rear, BDW, was I purchased an adaptor from Pirate Cycles that bolts around the rear hub and the drive sprocket bolts to that. I slid the adaptor out farther to keep the chain from rubbing. (I trued the rear wheel before I did this.) Then I had the new problem of the coaster brake anchor-arm binding up on the drive sprocket. So I took it off, stuck it in a vice, and bent it to more of an "S" shape than it was before. Some company I encountered also sells spacers for just such a purpose.

    And, yes, it was very necessary to cut a strip from my rear fender to let the chain pass.
     

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