maniac mechanic adapter issue worried

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by lucajo16, Jan 10, 2015.

  1. lucajo16

    lucajo16 Member

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    I got my new sprocket in and i put it on but I'm unsure if my adapter fits right. Its a maniac mechanic sprocket but it had some gaps on the sides where it screws in. The sprocket is screwed into the adapter and the adapter is as tight as I can but I can see a tiny bit of the screw on one side. I know it'll spin very fast. Will it be OK or am I in need to adjust the milling...which I don't feel very safe doing myself...maybe sanding it. :-||
     
  2. GoreWound

    GoreWound New Member

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    As long as it it clamped tight to the axle, and not wobbling that is fine.
    But as far as I know it should be almost impossible to assemble one of these adapters and have it wobble significantly.

    If you place the two halves together without the wheel you will notice the hole between them is not quite perfectly round, it will be very slightly oval.
    By being built this way it is impossible to bottom out the two halves against each-other when it is assembled. this allows you to get it clamped tightly on the axle.

    Also you can use the gaps the judge if one side is tighter than the other. You want the two bolts to be tightened just about equally (some variance is fine) if one side was all the way tight and the other was left open you might not be able to get the sprocket on.

    Also do NOT do what I did and leave a sticker wrapped around you axle under the adapter, this will make adjusting the chain alignment really difficult.
     
  3. MotorBicycleRacing

    MotorBicycleRacing Well-Known Member

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    There are supposed to be gaps.
    Just make the gaps the same.

    If there were no gap how could you tighten it down all the way?
     
  4. GoreWound

    GoreWound New Member

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    oh wait Lucajo16, did you mean gaps between the sprocket itself and the adapter?
    because that's not right at all, the sprocket is bent. not sure if you can do anything about it if its an aluminum sprocket other than get it replaced.
    if its a steel sprocket you might be able to flatten it but also, just replace it.
     
  5. MotorBicycleRacing

    MotorBicycleRacing Well-Known Member

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    Come on, it's obvious he is talking about the gaps between the 2 halves of the adapter.
     
  6. GoreWound

    GoreWound New Member

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    I figured ten seconds of typing was worth it in case my reading comprehension failed me.
     
  7. Dan

    Dan Staff
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    Always best to ask. Just makes every thing clearer and helps any thing over looked.

    Lucajo, can you post a picture?
     
  8. mapbike

    mapbike Active Member

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    No question is a bad one when your trying to figure out for sure what someone is asking so you can help them.
     
    #8 mapbike, Jan 11, 2015
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2015
  9. lucajo16

    lucajo16 Member

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    Ya I was talking about the adapter and sure here's a photo. Hope it loads. XD (( update. It won't let me upload the photo)) but the gap isn't really that bad now. I'm not worried now.
     
    #9 lucajo16, Jan 11, 2015
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2015
  10. MotorBicycleRacing

    MotorBicycleRacing Well-Known Member

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    How are you tightening the 2 allen bolts on the adapter? :)

    Only using a short allen wrench will not get them tight enough so the
    2 halves bite down on your hub the way they were designed to fit. :)

    Using a tube 'cheater" extension bar about 6" long on the allen wrench
    will give you enough leverage to crank them down to about 20 foot / lbs :)

    You say the gap isn't bad? Are they even on both sides? :) :)
     
  11. mapbike

    mapbike Active Member

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    I agree Neil, that is one thing that was not mentioned earlier, using a cheater on the Allen wrench to get some good torque on those bolts is very important and the only good way to get them tight enough.

    Map
     
  12. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Just curious so I question the makers of these adapters why they don't offer torque specs for their products. It would keep a lot of builders from having problems such as the OP had with his. I mean really; how hard would it be to type out a small instruction page to assist the buyer? It's called, 'Customer Support' and goes a long way toward making your company one that people want to deal with.

    Tom
     
  13. GoreWound

    GoreWound New Member

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    I would be willing to bet most of these adapters are not purchased directly from the manufacturer. Too many website seem to have identical ones to all be making them in house.
    There's the grapevine to think about when it comes to the instructions, if the manufacturer bothered to include a set with the batch there might have only been one copy or something. Even a manufacturer that does include instructions when selling directly might not when someone orders a large quantity.

    Also at least a few of these things out there are probably copies or new old stock and a seller would be unwise to give specific instructions only to become liable if those instructions are inaccurate.

    on the other hand a seller that does include these instructions, and maybe even is also the manufacturer, would probably charge slightly more for the product as they are offering a higher tier of service.
    You get what you pay for.
    Mine came with a small piece of paper that said to be careful about stripping the bolts and to use loctite for the sprocket. nothing else. Also the picture on the website slightly varied from what I received, the primary difference was that the picture had different color bolts, and mine were flush with the sprocket. I am assuming they have an old photo.
    I got a pretty good deal though...
     
  14. mapbike

    mapbike Active Member

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    I agree Tom,

    It would be very cheap and very easy to I clude even a strip of paper run through the hole on each adapter and stapled on the ends that would include a torque spec and the instruction to use a dab of thread locker on the bolts.

    There would be no reason for that smell thing to add any cost to the item, and it would reolve issue before they hapened with those who may be new to working with these type things.

    Only issue I can see with providing torque specs is that many people dont own a torque wrench and because the area for tightening the adapters bolts is so small it is really hard to get anything in there between spokes to use a torque wrench, but it may be possible and if it is, people like myself that have and use a torque wrench would likely appreciate havin some proven specs to go by so I know ai have everything where it needs to be the first time.
     
  15. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    I wouldn't expect to see instructions with a knock-off product but the major U.S. manufacturers of the true quality items we all know and use should consider something like Map suggested. Even something as small as a business card would suffice.

    As for a torque wrench fitting between the spokes, most inch pound wrenches are small enough. I've never had a problem getting the wrench and Allen head socket between them. Maybe I've just been lucky.
    But as far as owning a torque wrench I'm sure most will agree that it is a tool that every motorized bike owner/builder should have available. They aren't that expensive, especially compared with repair/replacement costs when things get overtightened and break.

    Tom
     
  16. mapbike

    mapbike Active Member

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    usflg
    Very true Tom, even the auto parts stores like Auto Zone and Advance Auto etc. have them at a good price, I bought my inch lb wrench at O'Reilly Auto for about $20

    Yes a torque wrench is a very good tool to have when working on many things, especially where steel bolts are going into aluminum, it can be the difference between ruining something or not, an experience nuckle buster can normally get by with or without one for many things since we have a good feel for how tight something should be, but to someone who hasn't been turning wrenches and working on a variety of things all their life they're very likely to under or over tighten things which just leads to more headaches that could have been avoided with a simple to use inexpensive tool.

    Map
     
  17. Davezilla

    Davezilla New Member

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    I gotta agree too, its not that hard for the reputable sellers who car about what they're selling to add torque specs either on a piece of paper or even stamping it on the part if the part is large enough. I know Fred puts the torque spec on his site in the description and that's still better than nothing, but most others simply don't bother.

    Especially for aluminum parts where a bolt is threaded directly into the aluminum, some specs should be listed to prevent overtorquing and stripping the threads. There are also torque tables online that tell the recommended torque range for bolts nuts and studs etc depending on the bolt size and grade, thread pitch, and material they are threading into. Anyone can look these up on their own but it would be common courtesy to include this with the part that's sent out.
    The torque tables do come in handy when modifying our own parts as well because any change in material or bolt diameter or thread pitch so optimum specs can always be achieved but if we make or sell a part, this info should be included as well as other info like tightening sequence if needed, and whether or not a gap is required on one side or both sides on parts like these hub adapters etc.
     

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