Hydraulics - are they possible?

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by buck1234, Apr 30, 2013.

  1. buck1234

    buck1234 New Member

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    Hi All;

    I was just wondering if a small displacement engine hooked up to a equally small Hydro pump could power a bicycle as well as any chain, jack shaft assembly. Sorry if this has been discussed before, but with all the talent here maybe someone has a plan.

    Buck aka buck1234
     
  2. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    The laws of physics will come into play here.
    You can't generate more energy than you use to produce it. If you have a small power source to produce another power source then the outcome will be less than what you use to produce it.

    Perpetual motion has never been achieved and that's what you seem to be asking for.
    If you have an engine capable of producing enough energy to power a hydraulic pump/motor then you'll have less energy available to power the bike than if you'd used the small engine as the primary power source.

    Yes, there are hybrids that use both fossil fuels and electricity to power a vehicle but they are not overcoming the laws of physics. There's no free lunch. You can only get what you put in. Energy can not be created or destroyed, only changed from one form to another. I didn't make this rule but we all have to live by it.
    Internal combustion to hydraulic/electric/thermal, etc. The results will always be the same.
    If you can overcome the laws, you'll be a very, very rich man some day. (if the oil companies don't buy it and bury it) :)

    Tom
     
    #2 2door, Apr 30, 2013
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2013
  3. wheelbender6

    wheelbender6 Active Member

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    Hydraulic propulsion systems work well on things like track hoes and winches, where speed is relatively constant. Hydraulics are less responsive than electrical and internal combustion propulsion where speeds vary a lot.
     
  4. tooljunkie

    tooljunkie Member

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    the returns would be far less than satisfactory in any attempt.
    hydraulic motor is the definition of parasitic loss.gets worse with small hoses and fittings.
    its quite an achievement to get 20 mph out of a 450 horsepower tractor pulling nothing but its own weight.
    on the other hand,my 1952 cockshutt 40 horsepower tractor will go 20 miles per hour
    on half the fuel.geared not hydraulic drive.

    on motorized bicycles the less friction the better,chain is about the least friction you can get.
     
    #4 tooljunkie, Apr 30, 2013
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2013
  5. buck1234

    buck1234 New Member

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    Well Shucks

    There I was sittin in the shade With 1/2 a Dr Pepper down and thought I had a good idea. My wife tells me my last good idea was to marry her. Probably right.

    Buck aka buck1234
     
  6. livesteamfan

    livesteamfan Member

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    If you could get one, you could use a hydrostatic drive that is being used on some motorcycles. Although, for the price of the pump, hoses, fittings, and wheel motor, you could probably buy the motorcycle. I will say, I don't know if that style of motorcycle is even in production, but I have read some articles and seen videos of hydrostatic drive motorcycles. Here's a some clips from a dvd that has to do with them:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t6G_YrGugug
     

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