How should I make a bike repair stand?

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by Nehmo, Feb 12, 2013.

  1. Nehmo

    Nehmo Member

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    I'm just going to use wood. Any ideas?
     
  2. Trey

    Trey $50 Cruiser

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    If you are lucky enough to have an inside workspace, how about hanging it from above? This is the rear wheel removed, at hand level.
     

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  3. Dan

    Dan Staff
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    #3 Dan, Feb 13, 2013
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2013
  4. Nehmo

    Nehmo Member

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    No insult intended, but you might consider entering that picture in the "What is it?" competition.
     
  5. Trey

    Trey $50 Cruiser

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    True, true... Not the pic I wanted to use, but my computering skills are lacking:)
     
  6. Nehmo

    Nehmo Member

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    [​IMG]
    I don't have inside space.
    I could fashion an
    an A frame - a beam - a vertical post
    _____________
    / \ ............... |

    and then hang the Harbor Freight Bicycle Lift from the beam.
    Have you ran the engine while the m-bike is suspended?
    (The pic below is irrelevant, but I just found it and wanted to promote it. I plan to make some improvements, adding motorizing components.)
    [​IMG]
     
  7. Nehmo

    Nehmo Member

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    I just read the reviews of the Harbor Freight Bicycle Lift. Some people believe the rope is inferior to what's needed and one guy suggested swivel pulleys would be an improvement and another recommended increasing the bend angle of the hooks , but the reviews were sufficiently positive to convince me to get one as soon as I can get to one of their stores.
    So, that's what I'm gonna do, make a beam supporting structure, get the Bicycle Lift, replace the rope, and install. I consider further improvements later.
     
  8. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Before you buy it check the load carrying capacity. I have two that hold pedal bikes, my wife's, and they were rated to hold only 75#. That's pushing the limits with a motorized bicycle.

    Tom
     
  9. thimmaker

    thimmaker New Member

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    You can make a quick and cheap stand out of 3/4" threaded galvanized pipe and fittings from your local hardware store. It'll hold any motorized bike a foot off the floor to work on it. Or higher if you want. Two 24" pipes threaded into 3/4" double 90 deg. corner piece for the foot stand. This leaves a threaded hole pointing up. Thread in a 36" pipe pointing up and cap it with a 90 deg. elbow. Thread a 12" pipe into the elbow pointing forward ( over the 24" legs). At the end use a 3/4" to 1" T fitting with the two 1" ends at horizontal. Now hack saw the top front 1/3 of the 1" tube away enough to lay in some thin, flat ,rubber and then the top bar of your frame. If the top bar is angled, just rotate the T fitting to match. You can use a standard spring clamp to hold the frame down but it usually will stay from the weight. The weight of the bike keeps the stand from tipping over backwards. You can put a couple of 3/4 threaded caps on the ends of the 24" legs to protect the threads. Any of the dimensions can be changed to your liking to raise or lower the work height. Iv'e also seen the 90 deg. elbow replaced with a T fitting so you can thread in a pipe pointing out backwards with a floor flange threaded on and you can screw it to the garage wall.
    Geo.
     
    #9 thimmaker, Feb 15, 2013
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2013
  10. 2door

    2door Moderator
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  11. wheelbender6

    wheelbender6 Active Member

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    I use a bicycle trainer. It attaches to the back wheel and keeps the bike upright.
     
  12. Dan

    Dan Staff
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    One of those links gave me an idea. An elevated work stand/truing station. Be able to do a complete bike tune up by locking it in, in one position. Thinking some thing like an ambulance gurney to easily change heights for different work needed.

    Over complicated and ridiculously expensive? Sure but hey.
     
  13. Trey

    Trey $50 Cruiser

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    Dan, roll it up in there, attatch to a couple of points on the frame, press a foot lever, bike eleveted and stable. Someone must make one for a thousand bucks or so, but we could build our own. I will be looking for an appropriate mechanisim. I'll update in a year when I find everything:)
     
  14. Dan

    Dan Staff
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  15. Nehmo

    Nehmo Member

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    [​IMG]Judging from the pics, these trainers, apparently, don't mesh well with a quick-release skewer as the rear axle?
     
  16. Nehmo

    Nehmo Member

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    The ideal work stand for a bike would be adjustable to allow securely holding the bike at a variety of heights.
    But being simple is an advantage too.
     
  17. CTripps

    CTripps Active Member

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    I have three tie-down straps (for loads on trailers), looped over the rafters in the garage. The two on one end loop under the handlebars, and now I use an S-hook on the third that gets hooked on near the seat post. I grab the loose ends of the front straps and pull, then the same for the rear until it's where I want it. A bungee cord looped through a concrete block provides stabilisation from below, when needed.
    Sort of like this:
    102_2387.JPG
     
  18. Trey

    Trey $50 Cruiser

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    Here's what I intend to build.
    Use a large (4'' tall/ taller?) truck jack, the old ratchet style, weld some (removable?) supports to the base. Create and attatch a bracket to the collar that moves up and down on the jack.

    (How about that Dan?)
     

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    #18 Trey, Feb 17, 2013
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2013
  19. Powertool

    Powertool Member

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    something like that, would work great . good idea, Trey.
     
  20. Trey

    Trey $50 Cruiser

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    Thanks. Everybody I know with that jack will part with it about as quick as their snow chains. I'll find one when the budget permits I suppose. Maybe somebody will see this and whip one up!
     

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