How do you do your handlebars with geared bikes?

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by KCvale, Apr 27, 2013.

  1. KCvale

    KCvale Active Member

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    I just shipped a 2-stroke shifter bike 1100 miles to Texas and was making re-assembly instructions and when I finished the handlebar portion I thought I'd make a topic about how I do them for reference.

    Be it a direct drive or a shifter 2-stroke motorized build, if your bike has derailleur gears it also has brake levers and at least one gear changer but usually 2.

    That is already 2 two lever controls and 2 forms of shift controls on your handlebars be that 2 twisters or 4 more levers, usually thumb levers.
    In many cases the shifters are a part of the brake assembly.
    That is a really bad combination that needs to go regardless in my book so look at that when choosing a bike.

    A 2-stroke kit comes with another lever and a full grip length twist throttle control.

    We have all seen the nightmare handlebars of builders that simply add a kits controls on to the handlebars that not only look scary but down right dangerous.

    I have a pretty simple formula I use on all my geared bicycle builds to share and it starts with stripping everything off the handlebars and rebuilding it like this.

    [​IMG]

    The first thing to go for me are the bikes grips, a box cutter is dandy for this if they don't come off easy.

    Next is any front sprocket derailleur mech and control, if you REALLY need to change to a different front pedal sprocket it is easy to do by hand and one shift control is gone from the handlebars not to mention more motor mount area.

    For the brakes you usually have 2 levers but you need to add a clutch so I remove both brake levers and put a SBP 'teeter-totter' self adjusting brake lever on the right with both brake cables, front brake in front, and then the throttle.

    I don't use any kits stock hard plastic grips so I pull the throttle barrel out of the throttle assembly and use a box cutter to remove the crap grip.

    The BMX style foam grips I use come in a variety of packages but usually have enough for 3 bikes and I use them because with a little warm soapy water you can 'milk' the foam grip over the oversize throttle barrel.

    For me this one simple thing that takes the stress and vibration out my hands is worth 10x their $12 price.

    For the left controls there is the clutch and rear gear shift control.

    Regardless of the gearing type I use a half length rotary shifter even if that means buying a new one ($8), sure the numbers are upside down but it doesn't matter, it is one half grip twister, you can reach the clutch fine, and the rest of the left handlebar gets a foam grip cut to size as well.

    I hope this helps those of you just starting, and it sure it adds $30 or more to the build cost depending on what you have, this setup is about as safe to operate and comfortable way to ride and control you machine as I have found yet and if you think about isn't that what you want anyway?
     
  2. wheelbender6

    wheelbender6 Active Member

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    Using a thumb throttle allows you to keep the grip shift on the right.
    Some members use a stick shifter to keep the handlebars uncluttered.
    I have seen stick shifters mounted on the stem, seat tube, seat stay and some
    other places. You don't shift that often on a motorized bike, so it is not necessary
    for the shifter to be mounted at your finger tips.
    Stick shifters can be made pretty easily from a grip shifter.
     
  3. Toadmund

    Toadmund New Member

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    My 21 speed is disabled, 1 speed all the time.
    No cables, no front derailler.

    Not needed in my opinion.
     
  4. LR Jerry

    LR Jerry Active Member

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    Well KC I've no need for gear shifters or clutch levers. My 5 speed automatic bike means I can clutter up my handlebars with other things. LOL. Still great advice for others.
     
  5. bigbutterbean

    bigbutterbean New Member

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    I don't have a two stroke or a bike with gears, so I have my handlebars setup like this. My front brake is on my left (rear brake is coaster). My brake handle also has a built-in brake light switch and a toggle switch for my headlight (used to be a horn button there, but since I don't have a horn, I removed the horn button and ground away inside the hand control to make room for the toggle switch). I have a centrifugal clutch, so no clutch lever cluttering up my handlebars. On my right is my throttle, and obviously my killswitch is built into my throttle housing, so that's it. I like my handlebars looking clean and uncluttered. My forks have brackets for a headlight, so I don't even have to clamp a headlight to my handlebars.
     
  6. Dasmailca

    Dasmailca New Member

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    When I built this bike (my first) I mistakenly thought that I wanted to be able to operate all gears and use it in pedal mode whenever I wanted (that hasn't happened yet lol ) so I removed the brake handles from the shifter combo and kept both shifter. Clutch on left and dual cable brake lever on right with throttle. Light and computer (speedo is very accurate , checked with GPS). After seeing yours I plan to clean them up.
     
  7. Dasmailca

    Dasmailca New Member

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    Tryin to include pic
     

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  8. KCvale

    KCvale Active Member

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    That works well for a direct drive, just make it a single speed like a beach cruiser with benefits, that being the dual V brakes and you can easily change your gearing by hand.

    My example is a jackshafted shifter so the whole point is to make the rear gears easy to operate as you use them all the time.
    With the shifter on the left you can downshift with your left hand as you pull the brake lever with your right hand which has to let up on the throttle anyway.

    That really is cool Larry, when it comes to controls less is best I think.
     
  9. Toadmund

    Toadmund New Member

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    To tell the truth, when I got the bike, the chain was rusted and the gears were a mess and the cables bad.
    I just couldn't bother fixing it up, considering the intended use for the bike.
    I'm OK with that.
    No motor, yes, I would bother.
     

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