Hot as a cheap pistol

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by Tom in Kingman, Sep 20, 2011.

  1. Tom in Kingman

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    My new bike does run nice BUT I had a small problem. When I came back from my little "shakedown" runs it was extremely hot to the touch. I was thinking that the 16:1 wasn't enough gas to cool it since I'm in 90+ degrees. I changed it to 24:1 and it improved it a lot. I then thought that with all this heat there should be more I could do. When on level ground I use the pedals and let the motor stay off. I then also shut the motor off with about 200 or more yards to go before going into my garage so the air could aid in the cooling off process. This also helped a bunch. I am learning the real purpose of this bike. It is a HELPER. If I tried to go all day with only the 48cc working it's tail off it would turn and attack my wallet.
     
  2. Venice Motor Bikes

    Venice Motor Bikes Custom Builder / Dealer/Los Angeles

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    Too much oil in the gas actually makes it run leaner!! (& hotter!)
    24:1 is better for break in, & 32:1 is what most builders recommend after break in (both using regular 2-cycle oil.)
     
  3. decoherence

    decoherence New Member

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    i'm not sure how you are noticing that it is too hot.
    if you are talking about the head or jug being too hot to the touch. that is ok.
    in fact. don't touch the head while running or just finished running the bike. it will fudge you up!
     
  4. Tom in Kingman

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    What I actually noticed was that after about 20 minutes of sitting the area around the fine was still hot. No need to touch it, just put my hand near it. After changing the mix it could be touched after 20 minutes. With pedaling for the last 200 or so yards it was even cooler. I am learning as I go. I still have a big question facing me. The way of virtually avoiding flats. I see those round things in the store. It seems hard to believe that something with no air in it could go flat. I read about things like rough ride. I am out here on washboard dirt roads. There IS NO smooth.
     
  5. GearNut

    GearNut Active Member

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    The foam rubber inserts can be very dangerous when used on an MB. They are reported to ride mushy like a flat tire and more than one member has had the tires roll off of the rim in fast cornering situations. Imagine you and your bike going one direction while your tires are going another direction!
    I am passing on knowledge from trusted members, NOT personal experience of mine.
    I like to learn from the experiences of others, and this experience I don't think I will try for my self anytime soon!

    As for flat resistant devices, you can get puncture resistant tires, Mr Tuffy tire liners, extra thick puncture resistant innertubes, and you can put Slime in your innertubes.
     
    #5 GearNut, Sep 21, 2011
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2011
  6. Tom in Kingman

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    I know fellas here in the desert that have Slime filled tires on ATV's and swear by it. I don't mind doing that if it is a virtual "sure thing". I have heard of the sturdier tubes with the outside half of an old tube placed in a protective position between the tube and the outside diameter of the tire. This would (in my very inexperienced mind) make for a thicker area for something to have to travel before entering the air filled portion of the tire. If I did that AND did the Slime thing then perhaps I can feel confident that I "should" not have a problem.
     

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