Hi from the UK - INDIAN Board Tracker tribute, my first build

PeteMcP

Well-Known Member
Jun 27, 2017
715
1,857
93
66
Thanks Rick,
Three items ordered off eBay came in together in today's mail. Allowed me to crack-on with installing the headlight/indicators to the girder forks. Particularly impressed with the black anodized cnc'd alloy headlight bracket which also features mounting holes for the indicators. I'm always happy with all the many Chinese-cnc'd parts I've used on various builds and have to wonder how they do them at the price. Even though I discarded the 4 x cnc'd metal clamps designed to fit 38-41mm tubular fork legs, the four-part mount was just what I needed to fit my vintage forks and well worth it.
Managed to snag a fat bike bottom bracket from the only UK seller listing one on eBay. Not sure yet, but I reckon I'll be fitting fixed pedals and merely using them as footrests.
As mentioned in an earlier post, this build is destined to be fully road legal here in the UK. It'll have to pass an MSVA test (Motorcycle Single Vehicle Application) after which I will register it with the DVLA and be allocated a license plate. For that reason, the lights/indicators are mandatory - unless registering a bike for daylight only use.
In an effort to keep the bars as tidy as possible, I've purchased and fitted a neat switch unit (pictured) which locates all the bike's functions (dipped/main beam, pilot light, left/right indicators, horn) on the left bar.
Next job is to hook-up the front brake and speedo cables. And fit a good 'ol analogue mph speedo.

DSCN3919 (2).JPG
DSCN3921 (2).JPG
 

PeteMcP

Well-Known Member
Jun 27, 2017
715
1,857
93
66
Glad the bike's lighting arrangements meet with everyone's approval.
I know they add a lot more style than their actual retail value would suggest. At 9.03 quid for that headlight and 12 quid for a set of four indicators - including shipping - I have to thank the Orientals once again for coming up trumps with super kit for next to no money. These days, when I hit the BUY-IT-NOW button on eBay or AliExpress for stuff like this, it's no longer a lottery whether or not what shows up may turn out to be cheap-looking junk. Always more than happy with such Far Eastern purchases.
I've used the same indicators on three of my bikes now - the Solo, Kawa Drifter and this latest build - and they add a touch of class to all three. Solo has the grilles on all its lamps installed vertically.
 

indian22

Well-Known Member
Dec 31, 2014
4,178
5,863
113
Oklahoma
Building or just parking bikes in ones living quarters extends the opportunity for the metal to speak to you. Ideas pop up as you just go about your domestic chores & I keep a notepad and measuring/drawing tools at hand to record my design thoughts. Parts required are noted & this makes ordering easier. Still a place outside is still required for the dirty end of the work and I'm thankful that I've made some room in the garage from which to work and have the basement for much overflow storage. I really favor cutting, grinding and welding out side under the car port for reasons of health and space cleanup.

Over the years several really nice builds were largely created in tight living quarters with ingenuity, determination and basic hand tools. Your bikes certainly qualify for this list!

Rick C.
 

Nightster

Well-Known Member
Mar 3, 2021
735
1,720
93
58
Texas
Building or just parking bikes in ones living quarters extends the opportunity for the metal to speak to you. Ideas pop up as you just go about your domestic chores & I keep a notepad and measuring/drawing tools at hand to record my design thoughts. Parts required are noted & this makes ordering easier. Still a place outside is still required for the dirty end of the work and I'm thankful that I've made some room in the garage from which to work and have the basement for much overflow storage. I really favor cutting, grinding and welding out side under the car port for reasons of health and space cleanup.

Over the years several really nice builds were largely created in tight living quarters with ingenuity, determination and basic hand tools. Your bikes certainly qualify for this list!

Rick C.
Agree

I have limited space, not that I am comparing myself to some of the fantastic builders on this site, but I’m making do...

I definitely agree with letting the bike sit in you living quarters for ideas. Mine has spoke to me in this way .shft.

unfortunately this will come to an end for me as my GF and daughter will be moving in soon. Great for inspiration and the thought process.
 

Oldbiscuit

Well-Known Member
Oct 3, 2020
146
401
63
65
I built myself a new garage/workshop a few years back. Not totally finished with the interior yet, but it’s workable. Funny thing is it has more square footage than my house, much to my wife’s displeasure. I hope to get it insulated and the in floor heating system done this summer so next winter I can really enjoy it.
 

indian22

Well-Known Member
Dec 31, 2014
4,178
5,863
113
Oklahoma
You are doing some fine work which I've noticed the members of the forum concur with. Life changes constantly and living with the ladies is a big one. I'm certain you can find a way to continue work, though it may entail some compromises on your part and perhaps a bit of pleading and favors from you! I wish you much joy in your life together as a family.

Creative wood workers also say the tree speaks to them and reveals what the design should be and when the works is complete. Metal seems to do the same. I machine a lot of free form from the basic design I'm working with. In some ways reduction of material be it wood, marble or metal etc. is basic sculpting. I've sculpted in wood, bone, ivory and metal, no rock, when I was doing wildlife art. I also drew and painted on paper and canvas. So I have a feel for this that I can't or won't subject to CAD automation. I want to feel the work coming to life. My idea of automation is kicking in the carriage feed for long turning on a lathe. Also shiny is not my friend on vintage style work. I prefer some tool marks and applied patina on my finished work. Some guys get it and others never will and both are ok responses as I'm pretty secure in my preferred outcomes.

Now this isn't to say I like sloppy work, but if one looks at enough old classics you know even the best of them out of the factory were just industrial/agricultural creations. The fully "restored" antiques which are over polished, plated and painted are beautiful but 'dang sure "taint factory finished & that goes triple for "barn find" restoration pieces.


Rick C.
 

Nightster

Well-Known Member
Mar 3, 2021
735
1,720
93
58
Texas
You are doing some fine work which I've noticed the members of the forum concur with. Life changes constantly and living with the ladies is a big one. I'm certain you can find a way to continue work, though it may entail some compromises on your part and perhaps a bit of pleading and favors from you! I wish you much joy in your life together as a family.

Rick C.
Appreciate it and thank you
 

indian22

Well-Known Member
Dec 31, 2014
4,178
5,863
113
Oklahoma
I built myself a new garage/workshop a few years back. Not totally finished with the interior yet, but it’s workable. Funny thing is it has more square footage than my house, much to my wife’s displeasure. I hope to get it insulated and the in floor heating system done this summer so next winter I can really enjoy it.
OB you will enjoy it. My small shop was 50'x25' and was packed will machine tools and welders. It was my hobby shop & not a commercial venture, that shop was really quite large. I miss both but mostly the small one. My home is not large but at 2,500. ft it's way big for one person and it would also be way too large for a hobby shop. 18'x25' in the garage is plenty big enough when well organized & the basement is larger than that so I've lots of options to work with here, both Winter and Summer.

I know you will get much return for your efforts in the shop area. As for your wife I have no comment or even opinion as I'm a single Old Guy and wasn't too great in the wife department when I had one!

Rick C.
 

PeteMcP

Well-Known Member
Jun 27, 2017
715
1,857
93
66
Spot on, Rick. There are times when I just sit and stare at the bike(s) for long periods whilst ideas and plans flit through my head - and I also spend a great deal of time lying awake in bed before eventually dropping-off to sleep doing the same. Jen always referred to this habit of mine as 'thinky time'. Was doing exactly this yesterday and came up with a neat idea for a battery box, so ordered-up the bits and pieces needed for that today.

I agree with you about working on builds outdoors when possible. Could really have done with doing that last week when silver soldering parts of the frame in the kitchen and a couple of days ago when power-filing the shortened forks. Surprising how much black smoke is created off MAPP gas. Every surface needed a good dusting afterwards. We have french doors in the lounge leading out onto a teeny - and I do mean teeny - triangular paved 'yard' hemmed-in by high walls, and if it was warm enough, I would have done the brazing outside, but it was simply too cold/wet. This week, we're experiencing a ten day rainless and unseasonably warm period.

Received a surprise today when a fellow resident in the block knocked on my door and handed over a large curved package which had been delivered to her by mistake. Wasn't hard to guess it was the bespoke-made 27" radius steel rear mudguard I ordered on Monday via an eBay seller (pics below). Contacted him to chat about my requirements and he rolled the 'guard to order using the original UK machines and tooling. Features beautifully rolled edges and beaded end. Lovely craftsmanship and only a four day turnround. What's not to like? I originally specified a much shorter 'guard - about half the length of this - but the maker told me his 'guards are easier and quicker to make using standard full length steel blanks and to cut the 'guard down to whatever length I need. Now I've laid it loosely on the bike to see how it looks, I rather like the idea of leaving it as is. Thing is, seeing all this bare metal makes me ever more loathe to cover anything in paint.

I've been prevaricating over whether to go for either the boardie or roadster vibe. The bike currently sits with those inverted/dropped handlebars, and as I discovered a couple of days ago when sat astride the bike while walking it round 180 degrees so I could photograph it from the other side, it's bloody uncomfortable perched aboard, leaning forwards, arse up, with both hands grasping the bars and only the family jewels balanced (read squished) on the nose of that Lepper Primus saddle. I'm thinking a set of pull-back tiller bars or beach-type bars would be far more in keeping for comfortable riding.



DSCN3927.JPG
DSCN3926.JPG
 

PeteMcP

Well-Known Member
Jun 27, 2017
715
1,857
93
66
You guys with the garage/basement/workshop stories are killing me!
Thing is, even if I had any of these, it still wouldn't be possible to go work in there and leave Jen unattended.
Can't complain about how things are. Still have Jen and at least I'm still getting some stuff built - which helps me stay sane.
 

PeteMcP

Well-Known Member
Jun 27, 2017
715
1,857
93
66
Nah, that wasn't me, Tom.
Rick would appreciate this 'guard. The seller/maker, Simon, makes it clear in his listing's description that all his 'various types of made-to-order 'guards feature scratches, imperfections and tooling marks. Not poor workmanship - just a hallmark of the traditional manufacturing process.