Help finding a nice commuter setup, please!

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by Jakerox43, Jul 6, 2009.

  1. Jakerox43

    Jakerox43 New Member

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    I have an 8.3 mile (one-way) commute that involves hills and flats. I have an adult bike with a straight frame, and 700c tires. I weigh 116 pounds, so it can have a low toothed sprocket. 4 stroke would be nice, but 2 is fine, and cheaper is better, so long as it's credible. I've looked at Bicycle-Engines and Gasbikes (sorry I can't post links).

    Any help whatsoever would be much appreciated! I'm kinda tired of slaving away for 80 minutes a day while the SPEED LIMIT 45 sign laughs at me... and it'll be my first vehicle! Thanks again!
    -Jake
     
  2. Finfan

    Finfan New Member

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    Well, the Chinese 2-strokes are cheaper than the 4-strokes but less reliable. They pretty much always need tweaking and fixing. The 4-strokes have problems with their centrifugal clutch and transfer case but are overall more trustworthy. The best 4-stroke setup will cost you about $650 (contact Azbill). The next best will be around $400 ( 49cc Complete Gas Powered Engine Kit - $369.99 ). My understanding from reading the forum is that these kits are fairly reliable as long as you don't use the dis-engager. Jet engines, rubber bands, and various other interesting to questionable ideas can be found in the do-it-yourself section of the forum. Good luck!
     
  3. Jakerox43

    Jakerox43 New Member

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    I guess my dilemma is whether to begin with the tinkering, oil-mixing, but lower price of the 2 stroke or the ease and reliability and hefty price of the 4 stroke. Up to me now I guess. Thanks for the input though
     
  4. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Jake,
    Welcome to the forum. FinFan speaks true. The 2 stroke motors are fun novelty items geared toward the tinkerer. They are not really considered reliable daily transportation. Nevertheless there are folks here that use them that way and seem quite pleased with the results. The four stroke motors are quieter, use gasoline and not a gas/oil mix and are more reliable. A 17 mile commute would not be unreasonable for a motorbike except in winter. As for speed; some of the speeds claimed by some people are a bit over rated. A stock, (unmodified)2 stroke with a small, 36 tooth sprocket will probably give you speeds in the mid, maybe high 30s but in reality 45 is a bit high, even for a good running 4 stroke setup with a shift kit. There are high performance options that can be added but even then you should prepare yourself for a slower commute than the traffic passing you. One of the most important things I always suggest is to look for a good reliable seller when making your purchase of a motor kit. The majority of the engines and kits are good but there is the occasional lemon and that's when a reputable seller will be there to take care of you after the sale. Hope this helps you to make a decision. Have fun and keep us posted on your build.
    Tom
     
  5. Retmachinist

    Retmachinist New Member

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    Tom, You couldn't have explained it any better in my opinion. Myself I love the 2 strokes, but they are definitly for the tinkerer! I have four of them and it keeps me busy keeping them all road worthy. I usually find that after any ride of any length there is something that needs adjusted or tightened. So far though I have never broke down. It's just that some run a little smoother than others.
    Like Tom says though 45 m.p.h. is probably out of the question, (Who wants to go that fast on a cheap bicycle anyway?) Most of mine go between 25 & 30 with the 44 tooth sprockets.
    Have fun with whatever you build, but remember this habit is Very Addicting!

    John
     

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  6. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    COOL PICTURE, John.
    Thanks for sharing that. What a stable...Hope you don't mind if I add it to my personal gallery.
    Tom
     
  7. Jakerox43

    Jakerox43 New Member

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    Awesome. Thanks. Just when I had decided on the 2-stroke from gasbikes.net... *sigh*(sarcasm) But that is very helpful, and I think tips the scale toward the 4-stroke, from gasbikes.net.
    I can tinker with the best of them, but I have almost no experience with gasoline engines and need to get to work on time and that can't depend on whether something comes loose.
    About the 45 MPH, I just meant I wanted to go faster.... 45 MPH could get dangerous on a bicycle. I have some hills that might get me up to that speed... but it isn't my goal.
    And I don't want to mix fuel much anyway....
    Question: How does the speed control work? And clutch? And to start it? I think they're pull-Starts and after a high enough idle the clutch will engage?
    And how does the throttle install? Do the grips on the handlebars have to come off except the gearshift? On one hand?
    Sorry about all the questions... but I'll post pics when I'm all done (as done as something like this can get-I tend to add features)... so far I have a speedometer, lock, water holder, coffee holder, back rack, and bike speakers (I took apart an easy button).
    Thanks!
     
  8. Jakerox43

    Jakerox43 New Member

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    So after finding out that my bike won't work, I'm back in the game. I want to get a cheapo walmart donor bike with handbrakes. Can anyone recommend one? Thanks!
     
  9. Retmachinist

    Retmachinist New Member

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    Why don't you try looking on craigslist for a quality bike. You can usually find a good used Trek, or Giant for $50 or less. Then you will be ready to go, with some decent components. If you use a cheapo from Wallmart you will end up replacing all the junk components in time and it will cost you way more money in the long run.
    I buy all my bikes on craigslist, usually mid 90's full chromoly frame bikes. They make excellent builds.

    John
     

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