hello

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by leo, Jul 20, 2015.

  1. leo

    leo Member

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    got my first test run in today. ran ok, but i still got a long way to go.
    i got a lot of tips and advise here, so i thought i would register and show my progress so far, and say thanks.

    it's just a stock walmart bike, i wanted to go cheap on my first try.
    had to make up temporary split front mount (new parts on the way), and switch to a 32t sprocket to get chain clearance.

    so far so good...


    Leo
     

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  2. Chaz

    Chaz Active Member

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    Welcome to the forum, Leo. Lot's of good people and advice here. Nice looking build. Looks like a wasp or hornet with those colours.
     
  3. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Welcome to the forum, Leo. We're glad you've joined us.
    You've done well on your first motorized bicycle project. Congratulations.

    Just a suggestion, and maybe it rides good as is but, knobby tires will give you a less smooth ride. You might want to consider a smooth tread at some point in the future.

    If you could match that chartreuse color you might consider adding some accent stripes or a 'swish' on the fuel tank and chain guard. That would really set it off. The color combination looks good. It is an eye catcher for sure.

    Have fun and ride safe.

    Tom
     
  4. leo

    leo Member

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    thanks, very much appreciated.
    i made a few changes yesterday. hard wired all the connections and loomed all the wires (a little black, neon yellow, and cherry red on the plug wire.)

    i plan to ride it on the hatfield mccoy trail system here in southern west virginia, that's why i went with the knobby 29" tires.
    would less rugged tires be a benefit on dirt trails as far as traction, torque, etc.???

    still got the dual cable pull, Z intake/carb combo, mounts, exhaust, and several other things i'm going to do soon, but she's slowly getting there.

    i had to sacrifice some low end torque with the 32t sprocket, i wanted to go with a 50t or maybe even higher for the hills. so, now i got to figure out how to get some of it back.
    on the bright side, it should wind up with better top end speed this way...

    so far i have spent just under $300, it's been outside less than an hour on the track across the street (testing) and several people have already approached me wanting to see it up close.
    "OMG, WHERE DID YOU GET THAT???" seems to be the question to ask... LOL
     
  5. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Leo,
    Going from a 32 to a 50T sprocket will decrease your top speed noticably but hills certainly won't be a problem. Unless you plan to be climbing very steep inclines you might want to explore something in the 40T range. That's an all round good gear ratio for most riding and riders.

    If much of your riding will be on dirt then stick with the knobby tires but on hard surfaces, asphalt or concrete, a smoother tread will make the ride more comfortable. Any vibrations you have from the engine will seem to be amplified with knobby tires.

    I like your attention to detail. That's always important when you want the bike to 'look' good.

    Tom
     
  6. Kioshk

    Kioshk Active Member

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    Nice job, Leo. I have the same bike. I run a 44T, and had to spread the chain-stay to get enough clearance. Also, my engine's down-post saddle was small, so I used a mounting-kit. It JUST fits. I'm curious: is the seat-post saddle on your engine FLUSH with the post, or is it at an angle? Your down-post seems parallel to the lower saddle and this frame's angles wouldn't allow a snug fit on both saddles. If the seat-post saddle isn't flush I highly recommend that you make it so; it's the most important frame/engine connection.
     
  7. leo

    leo Member

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    i had problems with both mounts. and the "universal" mount isn't quite as universal as they think...
    i had to make a temporary split mount for the front. the rear mount is shimmed a tiny bit to the right to line up well (almost zero drag out of gear). but i'm probably going to remove the shim when i redo the mounts, i don't really need it with the 32t.

    Kioshk: i am curious how you got around the inward bow in the rear forks with a 44t installed though. that could gain me a little low end torque right there...
    i tried turning the dished sprocket, offsets, washers on the axle ends, and everything else i could come up with but it still rubbed the upper rear fork with the 44 on. is there any way you could post a pic of your left rear fork area?

    or would you guys suggest i just ramp it up a bit and just keep the 32t with it's higher top end speed???

    to be honest, this is my first build and i'm certainly no engine guy. how would using pedals for some of the low end torque on the stepper hills effect overall performance??? would i even be able to maintain enough speed to keep the engine going? i'm guessing it would be ok to start it around 7-10mph or so... probably bog down and die out under that... so far, i have only ran it maybe 2 miles on level paved ground (still in testing stages).
     
  8. Kioshk

    Kioshk Active Member

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    I had to use an old scissor-jack to spread the chain-stays a few millimeters to accommodate the 44T. It's a PITA, but it's do-able. I'll post some pics later.
     
  9. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Leo,
    Your engine will produce more power as it accrues miles. Yours isn'y anywhere near broken in yet. After several tanks of fuel you'll begin to notice an increase in performance. Give it a chance before making any drastic changes.

    As for fork clearance, maybe Kioshk will provide a photo and further explanation on how and where he spread his frame. I've attached a photo of a quick and simple tool for spreading frames. It is a turnbuckle with two 'U' shaped parts to fit a frame tube.

    Pedal assistance won't hurt anything and in fact is encouraged as opposed to lugging the engine down to climb hills.

    Tom
     

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    #9 2door, Jul 20, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2015
  10. leo

    leo Member

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    got it out a minute or two, started easier. :)
    i'm going easy on it until i get the kinks ironed out. one kink at a time.
    i appreciate all the input from all of you, btw.

    i changed to white split loom, the yellow didn't quite match.

    too much???
     

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  11. Kioshk

    Kioshk Active Member

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    Looks good! Although I treat my machine as a tool...not too concerned about the look:
    [​IMG]

    Lookign down @ idler (notice slight bend):
    [​IMG]

    Again...:
    [​IMG]

    Tire clearance (I agree with 2door: get slicks...ESPECIALLY for the rear...the chain will chew away at the thicker-tire):
    [​IMG]

    Down-tube mount (looks ugly, but it's trouble-free...ALWAYS get the seat-tube saddle flush if you can):
    [​IMG]

    Note that I have a shorty intake-plenum...it would have been impossible to fit the engine otherwise. Also, I replaced the stock rear-wheel with my own custom quick-release hub and @ 36-spokes. That Walmart hub WILL deteriorate quickly.
     
  12. leo

    leo Member

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    ahhaaa, i see...

    so, if after break-in, i decide i need to go back to my 44 or even higher, i now know how... thank you!!!
    i had considered trying to bend the rear forks somehow, but had dismissed it as possibly doing irreparable damage.

    i didn't know that, or the spreader trick...

    i absolutely love these things, btw. i wish i had known about doing this years ago...
     
  13. Trey

    Trey $50 Cruiser

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    Not at all.
    Most everything I build is monotone, it's good to see some lively color!
     
  14. leo

    leo Member

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    can i buy a fork spreader or do i need to make one myself??? i did a quick ebay search, but all i get is kitchen utensils... lol
    i plan to continue through break-in with the 32t until i'm sure it's too small, but i get the feeling i will need to go larger eventually.
     
  15. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    I've never seen a spreader made for bike frames. The one I pictured I made in just a few minutes because I needed it quickly. It's a little rough but works well. It is made from a 1/4" turnbuckle with the right and left hand threaded eye bolts modified to fit around a frame tube. Guess I should put a patent on it, huh.

    Tom
     
  16. leo

    leo Member

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    2door, that's probably not a bad idea.
    ebay shows bicycle fork spreaders as being a "searched for" item but with zero results.
    that means people ARE looking for them, they just aren't finding any.

    so.... congrats, you are going to be rich!!! :)
     
  17. curtisfox

    curtisfox Well-Known Member

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    If you can't make one you can by a chev exhaust spreader on eBay cheep.......curt
     
  18. Kioshk

    Kioshk Active Member

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    Great idea, CurtisFox; do you know what the min/max dimensions on these exhaust manifold spreaders are?

    I used one of these I had laying around:
    [​IMG]

    It was a tight fit to start with and I used a mallet to force it into the gap before spreading.

    Be sure to lock the axle-end by replacing the axle and nuts before spreading! I found the job needed a LOT of force. 6061 Aluminium isn't very malleable, so you'll need to over-spread a little to get it right.
     
  19. leo

    leo Member

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    i like the screw jack idea, and i have one of those handy :)

    thanks guys, and/or girls...
     
  20. curtisfox

    curtisfox Well-Known Member

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    Got the idea on the forum,others have used it, I will get mine out a check later as not home right now.....They are like $7 on eBay ....Curt
     

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