hello from AZ

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by JeepZJ, Apr 28, 2016.

  1. JeepZJ

    JeepZJ New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2016
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello everybody,

    Names David I'm from Laveen, AZ (Phoenix) getting ready for my first build with a Cranbrook. Looking Looking to get a 80cc motor kit soon with a few basic upgrades. I'm sure I have lots of reading to do and I will have plenty of questions along the way.

    Thanks,

    Dave
     
  2. 2door

    2door Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2008
    Messages:
    16,310
    Likes Received:
    38
    Dave,
    You've come to the right place for help and advice with your new project. Don't hesitate to ask if you have questions, that's why we're here. You'll also find using our 'Search' a valuable tool. Discussions on every aspect of building a motorized bicycle can be found in our archives.

    Good luck and have fun.

    Tom
     
  3. KCvale

    KCvale Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2010
    Messages:
    3,961
    Likes Received:
    35
    Welcome Dave, KC in Phoenix here.
    Is it too late to talk you out of using a Huffy Cranbrook?

    If so expect to spend a lot more money as an $87 WallyWorld special is junk and will start showing it when you have to replace the back wheel.
     
  4. JeepZJ

    JeepZJ New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2016
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the advice and it's something I have already considered. I have payed $0 for the bike just have to drive the 8 miles to my brothers house to pick it up when he gets back in town.
     
  5. ZipTie

    ZipTie Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2016
    Messages:
    750
    Likes Received:
    30
    Welcome to the forum, Yea, adding too what KC said, buy some cone nut wrenches if you don't already own them to keep the back wheel hub greased and bearings adjusted. Other than that the cranny is a good frame and the spokes and wheels are pretty decent. Also a CNC rear hub adapter and sprocket invested in, will save you much time and frustration down the road.
     
  6. JeepZJ

    JeepZJ New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2016
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yes that is the first upgrade to the kit I will be buying before I ever even install the kit. I'm not a fan of the clamp on spokes style and they are dangerous.
     
  7. ZipTie

    ZipTie Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2016
    Messages:
    750
    Likes Received:
    30
    Glad to hear of your good decision. As much as one can try there are just to many angles that kit rag joint sprocket can go and will always wobble just enough to cause chain problems. The bikes pedal easier also with this straight as an arrow sprocket, so there is no doubt less drag. That less drag translates to less engine struggles for these small motors also. I have the CNC sprocket on all my builds but my son was a hold out. Last week I installed a CNC hub adapter on his Cranbrook as a gift and he called me today to say thanks and whewww what a completely different bike it was. Another investment worth another 12bucks is to immediately get and install a 41 chain from a good hardware store and rivet it together so u have no master links for dependability. This chain is better quality and it will also smooth things up even more. Good luck with your build!
     
  8. JeepZJ

    JeepZJ New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2016
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Good tip! I wish these kit sellers had upgrade options in drop down menus I mean some do like bikeberry but you have to search for the cnc adaptors and new sprockets if they honestly were concerned for customer safety they wouldn't sell rag joint style of sprockets but I know they cost next to nothing to produce and that's why they use them. One of the other upgrades I want to make are to the wheel bearings themselves I will switch to a high quality tool grade steel or possibly ceramic still doing my research. At work I switched out steel bearing for ceramic and though the cost was 3x the cost of steel bearings we have more then made up that cost in maintenance costs from not having to have it serviced as often. We were replacing bearings every 3-6 months but the ceramic bearings have been in for 3 years with no issues. Plus I can pay a guy $24 for one hour of inspection time in comparison to $48 for 6 hours of rebuild time. But not sure the savings would translate for a bike.
     
  9. ZipTie

    ZipTie Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2016
    Messages:
    750
    Likes Received:
    30
    Yes they could make it much easier to upgrade and give credit on the parts you don't want in the kit or can swap out better components for ones that you won't use anyhow. Yes there is no doubt safety issues with a sprocket that helps the chain fall off and locks up your rear tire. As far as bearings go, just better bearing would be a good upgrade too, but all bearings will fail if not kept slathered with good grease anyhow I guess.
     
  10. KCvale

    KCvale Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2010
    Messages:
    3,961
    Likes Received:
    35
    I beg to differ...
    Apparently you don't know how to install a stock sprocket propery.
    Done right I find them better than any clam shell.

    If a bolt or two get loose on a stock mount you tighten them, no damage.
    If anything gets loose on a clam shell hub mount the bolts that go through to your spokes will take them out causing catastrophic failure.

    It's not hard, you just need something you can put the wheel in a spin it to true it.

    And note, some sprockets come warped!
    Always put the sprocket on a hard flat surface to make sure its true.
    Heck, I must have a dozen here that were warped on delivery.

    One thing is true, you can't ever get a warped socket true regardless the mount.
     
  11. ZipTie

    ZipTie Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2016
    Messages:
    750
    Likes Received:
    30
    KC I know you are an amazing MB builder I envy your builds big time, but you are a rare and very experienced expert. Yes, your 100 percent right on the money with the rag joint sprocket set up working perfect for you and many guys that have installed many of them or even a newbie or two who got lucky or had really good mechanical skills. Heck, I don't know what I'm doing with them at all as I've personally never installed one, but I watched and pitched in with other guys that took advice from experts like you and struggled for numerous eves to install true, drive, adjust and true, drive, adjust and true... fiddle, fiddle night after night working on chains, rag joint chain rag joint over and over sometimes into the wee hours of the morning. They were true and torqued up tight as heck but only after a few days of riding they were back at it. Wow were they ever determined to get rid of the always just slight wobble and chain issues, after all... experts told them how easy it was and I think they felt kinda dumb and yet challenged. I told them give up already and get a clam shell... There are Just so many factors to get it right. I would imaging you can do blind folded and fast. In all due respect I think your forgetting that some, if not most people doing their first builds have a difficult and frustrating time getting that sprocket dialed in all directions. Part of the problem is the terrible and inconsistent rubber donuts that vary in thickness so compression is very inconsistent that changes under pressure and movement, and yep warped sprockets, soft sprockets that bend or get out of true during the violence of bump starting. I suspect if the rubber was perfect in thickness and better quality or a bit harder the pulling and movement would be far less and would install faster. When it un-trues though, it causes unexpected problems for the many non expert builders. I know a guy who can paint signs by hand fast and perfect every time but it isn't the brush he's using! Its his 20years of experience, and it seems simple and easy to him but not others. Yes the dangers of CNC sprockets bolts coming off has caused on guy or 2 to damage his spokes but they forgot the needed Blue locktite and the bolts or forgot to check them for tightness periodically. The CNC adapters and sprockets go on fast and darn straight for anyone and even have slight left and right adjustments for perfect chain alignment and they get the newbie on the road quicker as they never wobble or go on off-centered. A person just has to figure what your time is worth or just either get really good at installing the rag joints or just never give up on trueing them. its why ill stick to just getting a modern precision computer made clam shell sprocket adapters. Now available for just 40 bucks. I will continue to recommend them to new guys until something better comes along. One can now choose many hours of cumulated work for many 1st time builders to get the rag joints centered and trued in all directions and likely more than once, or just get a CNC clam shell right away that's pretty close to perfect in minutes. Its a lot of directions the rag joints can go on a X, Y, Z, axis. and with a CNC adapter you only have to worry about Z. The CNC sprocket and the clam shell and innovations like this are something a new builder should be reminded of and take advantage of if they can afford it in my opinion. My son could of been seriously injured at least 3 times because of a rag joint problems and his stubborn belief it should be easy to install and be perfect. He now has a CNC clam shell finally and realized how dangerous it is to have a chain de-rail and lock up your bike instantly. Last time he also had to walk 1 mile holding his rear tire off the ground after truing his sprocket for the 6th time with his chain locked up so he couldn't pedal hm either. Sometimes the best advice comes from a newbie.
     
  12. Tyler6357

    Tyler6357 Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2012
    Messages:
    904
    Likes Received:
    31
    ZipTie---I agree with you, driving the wheel with the spokes is lame and very difficult to get right and even harder to keep right...clam shell or nothing!
     
  13. JeepZJ

    JeepZJ New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2016
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well I thank everyone for the input I will be using a CNC piece. For an easy installation and what I feel is more reliability. I have every type of lock tite under the sun so that's not an issue. I don't want to try and eyeball my spokes or wheel true after installing a rag joint. I also firmly believe that spokes are not designed to take a side load of any kind.
     
  14. KCvale

    KCvale Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2010
    Messages:
    3,961
    Likes Received:
    35
  15. ckangaroo70

    ckangaroo70 Active Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2011
    Messages:
    818
    Likes Received:
    52
    Welcome to the forum. Glad you are here.
     
  16. ckangaroo70

    ckangaroo70 Active Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2011
    Messages:
    818
    Likes Received:
    52
    I use the clam shell as well on my bike. Seems to keep things trued up nicely and has been on the rear hub for hundreds of trouble free miles. Perhaps it would have been trouble free without it as well, but not an overly pricey add-on and it seems to do what you would expect it to do.
     

Share This Page