Handlebar vibration solution!

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by toker_ace, Sep 15, 2009.

  1. toker_ace

    toker_ace Member

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    has anyone came up with a way to help with handlebar vibration? I wonder if you could fill them with water or syrup or something?
     
  2. camlifter

    camlifter Active Member

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    i fill all my handlebars and frames with expanding foam, the kind that comes in a can from lowes, it works great.
     
  3. toker_ace

    toker_ace Member

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    expanding? or non-expanding?
     
  4. drhofferber

    drhofferber New Member

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    try GE clear silicone...Dennis
     
  5. paul

    paul Active Member

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    good idea on the foam. i would say the expanding. nice part with that is the stuff is bassically weightless. i am going to try it. i have used greatstuff for other things and like it. here is what it looks like
     

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  6. Kevlarr

    Kevlarr New Member

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    I just replaced my grips with some like these
    [​IMG]
    Made a world of difference.

    Does the foam really work? I wouldn't think that it would do much because the foam doesn't have much mass and you need mass to deaden vibration.
     
  7. toker_ace

    toker_ace Member

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    The more I think about it I think it would be easier to just get some padded gloves to wear? Like mechanic gloves or something.
     
  8. Russell

    Russell Active Member

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    Yes padded gloves will help your hands but, does nothing for mirror, speedo or anything else mounted to the hbars.
     
  9. Russell

    Russell Active Member

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    That foam is right up there with: duct tape, bailing wire and ty-raps! But not sure if it will help in this situation.
     
  10. BrettMavriK

    BrettMavriK New Member

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    I just isolate my engines from the frame with rubber.
    Why not eliminate the source instead of trying to band-aid a problem?
     
  11. BarelyAWake

    BarelyAWake New Member

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    I tried "rubber" mounts for my MB early on during it's prototype phase, but as the engine still wasn't broken in and was 4stroking a lot I found that although the mounts helped reduce the vibration I felt - it accented the engine's shaking and contributed to a fuel frothing problem and making it run even worse.

    No - I wasn't using old bike tires for mounts or anything, I had "discovered" some nice polyurethane transmission racing mounts in the "other" pile at work and made bushings out of the cut down stock.

    Only 1/8" thick I didn't think it would cause any problems, but man the motor ran a LOT better w/o them... I suppose now that I've gotten it running sweet I could put them back, but the vibration isn't really bothering me anyway what with the comfy gel seat I now have etc.

    Just a thought ;)
     
  12. toker_ace

    toker_ace Member

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    Yea, I agree with you.On my first couple of builds I used rubber between mounts and the frame and It may help with vibration in the bars, But It vibrated the engine completly apart.I think a solid mount is way better!
     
  13. BrettMavriK

    BrettMavriK New Member

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    A flat piece of soft rubber isn't the answer.
    That allows too much play for the engine to dance.
    It needs to be done round bushing style, so as to capture
    the engine tightly, but provide an isolation between the motor and
    frame metal. Too much play and you might as well suspend your engine
    in your frame with rubber bands.
     
  14. Tim_B_172

    Tim_B_172 New Member

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  15. silverbear

    silverbear The Boy Who Never Grew Up

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    How did that silicone caulk work out? Was there an appreciable difference? I have noticed after long rides a tingling in my hands from the vibration, which on both my Americans seems minor, but after long rides is still a factor. This is not only uncomfortable but I wonder at the long term effect for riders who put a lot of miles on daily, say a hefty commute to and from work. In my part of the world of northern Minnesota there was a time when loggers developed something called "white hand" after long hours day after day running a chain saw. Back then there was more vibration coming through the handle. Over time that breaks down the capillaries in the hands so that there is a blood circulation problem, sometimes pretty bad. The skin tone becomes more white due to the lack of blood and they are always cold from lack of warm blood circulating throughout the hand. My thinking is that the vibration coming through our handlebars could be more than just a minor discomfort, but eventually a major ailment. So while some may think this is no big deal, maybe for long riders it is. Brett, what you described with the rubber bushings sounds similar to the rubber bushings on more modern chainsaws. I know that with your quality builds if your engines walked around you wouldn't use them and I believe you when you say they reduce vibrations. I seem to remember seeing a picture of your mounts, but would appreciate looking again. Do you have a link? Thanks,
    Silverbear
     
  16. radrob

    radrob New Member

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    my vibration problums went away after 150 or so miles. once the engine broke in, no vibration at all. although i switched to foam grips.(popular back in the 80's) that helped alot.
     
  17. Screws

    Screws New Member

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    I used an old inner tube to wrap the downtubes where my motor and my tank mount up, still get the vibration, but it's not as bad.... I'm studying on trying that foam in the handlebar, kind of like a dampener as described above.....


    -Screws
     
  18. Sydneysider

    Sydneysider New Member

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    having a slick tyre on the front might also help a bit in reducing vibration while cruising.. previously used knobby tyres, now I use slicks for a smoother ride on the road
     
    #18 Sydneysider, Sep 17, 2009
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2009
  19. BrettMavriK

    BrettMavriK New Member

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    Right on my Signature, there is the link... =-]'
    'Brett
     
  20. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

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    Take your bars to a gunsmith and have them filled with lead shot. Pour some epoxy in each end to seal and you are golden.
     

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