frame recommendation help

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle Welding, Fabrication and Paintin' started by jamie7, Sep 11, 2011.

  1. jamie7

    jamie7 New Member

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    Hi,


    I'd like to build a cruiser or something that looks like one of those turn of the century racers but I'm freakin huge. At 6'2" with a 34.5" inseam I have to raise the seat post an unsightly amount. This throws off all proportion of what I'd like. I could get the saddle back but it would still be high. I've got a hybrid cruiser frame and a bunch of mb s that I've accumulated getting ready to chop and weld up something but need some design direction and advice.

    Any ideas on a design for a tall guy that would keep the proportions for a decent looking motorbicycle?

    BTW I just read through this entire section of the forum getting ideas - not asking blindly.

    Thanks
     
  2. motor_bike_fanatic

    motor_bike_fanatic New Member

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    I'm 6 ft 2. dont know what tou mean by inseam, but if that means waist, I'm a 44. I weigh 290 lbs. I have a 26 inch beach cruiser. I have my seat almost all the way down. it may be up an inch or two because I have a luggage rack that clamps to my seat post. I am completely comfortable on my bike. my feet can also touch the ground when I'm sitting at idle. I see no reason that you should need to raise the seat an obscene amount if you have a 26 inch frame. therefore I offer you no special recommendations.
     
  3. silverbear

    silverbear The Boy Who Never Grew Up

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    I have experience with two bikes which have the kind of frame look you're talking about. One is a Worksman NB and the other a Schwinn straight bar (Panther). The Worksman feels like a smaller bike and the Panther feels like it was made for an adult. Something about the proportions. Yes, with a 34" inseam you've got long legs to deal with. I'm six foot with a 30-31" inseam. A lay back post on the Panther would be about right, I would think. I don't know what kind of engine you intend to use and how much pedaling you have in mind, which makes a big difference. My use of pedals is as foot rests and I pedal to propel the bike as little as possible. While I love the geometry of these frames, I am too old to be laying down on a bike to look like I'm racing. I like being comfortable, so sit upright on a comfortable seat. The look I want is early motorcycle, not racer. If you can content yourself with that you should be good to go. Some big fellows rode those early ones you can be sure. I'd choose the Panther over the Worksman frame any time and doubt I'll use a Worksman frame again. For anything but a HT motor the Worksman frame has to be altered, while the Panther has a lot more room without modification. I think the answer for you will be in repositioning the seat... getting it back there as far as you can. The lay back post is one way, but I've seen others that position the seat back even more. That would give your legs the stretch you're looking for.
    SB
     
  4. jamie7

    jamie7 New Member

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    Thanks for the replies:

    MBF, I havent been able to find a 26" frame (on the cheap). That would be the way to go. I've got a ccm cruiser that's only 20" I got free and four mbs that are around 22-23". I've got welding equipment so I thought of doing some resizing and customizing to see if I could come up with something cool. BTW inseem is leg length - the one the tailor does that makes guys jump.



    SilverBear,

    I wasnt familiar with the two bikes you mentioned so I did a google image search - both nice but that schwinn straight bar is outstanding! That's exactly what I want. I think one of those with a layback post as you said is right on the money - thanks! I've got two 2stroke kits on two mbs right now as well as a few other small motors kicking around (non-kit) that I may use so I'm pretty versatile.
     
  5. silverbear

    silverbear The Boy Who Never Grew Up

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    jamie7,
    Glad to be of help. The Panther frame isn't being made anymore, but Schwinn used the same frame with different names, decals, color schemes for a number of years, a couple decades actually, so they are out there. The equivalent of Craigslist up your way or ebay will turn something up. It is worth the wait finding the right frame. The older Chicago made Schwinns were top of the line in their day and they were made well.
    Sportscarpat makes and sells custom in frame tanks for two frames, the Worksman and the Panther. Or since you weld, make your own. Hope to see photos of your build in progress this winter.
    SB
     
  6. jamie7

    jamie7 New Member

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    Silverbear,

    Thanks for the info. I'll keep looking and keep posting. I've seen a few on cragslist, kijiji, etc., but they all seem to be 20-22" so it may take a while if I wait for a 26" frame to show up. But I've got two mbs motored up so I can still have fun riding in the meanwhile.
     
  7. Scootmeister

    Scootmeister Member

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    When I started building my Murray cruiser I was as concerned about the length as I was about height. I'm 6'2" and needed more space between the set and peddles without raising the seatpost a rediculous amount. I solved the problem by stretching the front out 4" with a springer, and added about 4" to the rear with beefed up axle mounting plates in place of the knockouts. To take full advantage of the additional length I moved the seat back several inches to extend the distance to the pedals. It's much more comfy.weld and seems to handle better. Some folks extend the wheelbase by cutting the frame and welding in longer tubes. I'm such a lousy welder, that option would have meant days of grinding!!
     
  8. jamie7

    jamie7 New Member

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    SM,


    Those are great tips. Did you ever post pics of that build?
    I'd be very interested in seeing it since we are the same height.
    What size frame did you start with?
     
  9. silverbear

    silverbear The Boy Who Never Grew Up

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    Scootmeister,
    Yes, please post photos. I've been contemplating extending the dropouts on an oddball build ( Tomos/AMF Roadmaster is the name of the build thread ) so that I can use 26" wheels on the bike. There is plenty of height room, but not length, as even a 24" wheel runs out of room. Extending the dropout/ axle mounting plates would answer that problem. I'm wondering how you did yours.
    Somewhere on this forum, perhaps a year ago, someone said they bought plates made for that purpose which bolted on That's what I'd like to find and then also do some welding to make sure nothing comes apart at speed. By chance do you know of a source for such plates? I may have to make something up from scratch if I can't find a source for buying them. Thanks,
    SB
     
  10. jamie7

    jamie7 New Member

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    Hi Silverbear,

    man that orphaned moped is lookin' pretty sweet! I read through that build thread for the tomos/roadmaster - can't wait to see it completed. I like the one picture of you sitting on the steps looking at the bike up on the trailer because I recognized a look in your eyes - dreamin of her on the open road.
    cabin pontoon sounds pretty cool too. Should change your handle to "Huck".

    Best


    Should I apologize for highjacking my own thread? Oops.
     
    #10 jamie7, Sep 12, 2011
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2011
  11. silverbear

    silverbear The Boy Who Never Grew Up

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    Thanks, Jamie.
    The dreamer on the steps is Fasteddie (Steve) who did the welding. Yeah, he's a dreamer, too. Should be a fun bike to ride. We'll see.
    SB
     
  12. Scootmeister

    Scootmeister Member

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    I was going to post pictures but got pre-empted by a gal named Irene, a hurricane that is. She dumped 18 inches of stinky salt water in my garage and screwed up my fun!! Will post photos once I get it all cleaned up. I fabricated the mounting plates from 3/8" plate steel using an enclosed horizontal slot instead of an open onescratg for added strength. My frame is a little too narrow, so the bolt-on plates allow me to open the frame a bit as I bolt the wheel on. Probably too anal about that, maybe I'm part German and just like to over-engineer! One of the bolts that holds the plate on is welded to the knockout, the other is not welded since it holds the brace for my seat and the fender brace and needs to be removeable. Changing tires is complicated by having to unbolt the plates, but that's a tradeoff I'm willing to take right now(might reconsider after my first flat out in the boonies). It's easy to fabricate plate steel if you have a good jigsaw and sharp blades. I put blue painting tape on the metal and draw the cutting line on the tape with a good pen. With a little grinding and filing, you'd be surprized what you can come up with. BTW, my Murray is a 26er. Thanks for your interest.
     
  13. Scootmeister

    Scootmeister Member

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    Sorry, I meant 1/8" not 3/8"!!!!
     
  14. jamie7

    jamie7 New Member

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    Thanks SM,


    I think I can picture that in my head. I may give it a try if I need the extra length ( or width for narrow forks). Enclosed slot sounds like a good idea for strength.
     

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