Flat resistent tires?

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by mexican, Dec 8, 2012.

  1. mexican

    mexican New Member

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    Well,, i had my first flat on my Cadillac today, i know some of you mentioned that posibility with the friction kit and now i know you guys were right!
    Had to call my wife to come and get me about 12 miles out.
    Do the tubes with the green stuff that they sell at Walmart really work? They advertise that they won't go flat, just wondering!
    :-||
     
  2. dracothered

    dracothered New Member

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    What kind of flat did you have, was it a puncture wound or some other kind of blowout. There is a liner that you can put in the tire between the tube and the tread, but I don't remember what it is called.
     
  3. mexican

    mexican New Member

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    It was a leak, i rode 12 miles and stopped to see a friend, was inside for 20 minutes, when i went back out the tire was completly flat!
    It would be great to find that liner and get some extra insurance!
     
  4. GearNut

    GearNut Active Member

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    The best combination I know of is using both a tire liner such as a MrTuffy liner as well as using heavy duty down hill mountain bike inner tubes.
    The inner tubes are very thick like a motorcycle inner tube.

    Take it from a semi-retired motorcycle mechanic....
    Do not use any sort of slime sealer.... EVER!
    It is not intended to be a permanent solution to a flat and when the time comes to make a proper repair you have a slimy gooey hellish mess all over the place.

    Every shop I worked at charged anywhere from $20 to $40 more if there was any variant of slime involved during a tire repair. That still did not make it worth the aggravation involved.
     
  5. mexican

    mexican New Member

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    Thanks Gearnut!! Where do i find such innertubes?
     
  6. GearNut

    GearNut Active Member

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    Any reputable spandex shop, Ummm, I mean popular reputable bicycle shop that sells mountain bikes and parts. Expect to pay $12 to $15 per tube. It is sooo worth the extra $.
     
  7. mexican

    mexican New Member

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    Will buy them monday, there are a few "spandex" shops around here, ha ha
     
  8. GearNut

    GearNut Active Member

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    They should sell the liners too. I paid $15 for a pair, 26" liners

    (13x2=26) for the tubes and 15 for the liners.
    so $41 + tax should be fair.
    It is not cheap, but you get what you pay for.
     
  9. biknut

    biknut Active Member

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    One thing you can do that doesn't cost anything is, take the old inner tube, and cut the valve stem out, and then cut around the inside circumference of the tube.

    Take the new tube and place it inside the old tube, so you end up with double thickness. That helps a lot.
     
  10. biknut

    biknut Active Member

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    Also I've learnded that some tires are a lot more resistant to punctures than others. Kenda is a good tire brand for this.
     
  11. dracothered

    dracothered New Member

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    Would of never thought of that one, thanks...
     
  12. turbo1889

    turbo1889 New Member

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    I HATE FLATS !!!

    ----- I use puncture resistant bicycle tires with puncture resistance built right into the tire (Armodillo, Snake Skin, Iron Cap, Hard Case, etc . . .) specifically ones that have the puncture resistance built into the side walls of the tire not just the bottom of the tread since that is the main thing I'm trying to cover with them since a liner doesn't protect the side-walls.
    ----- I use a "Stop Flats 2" Liner inside of the tire, previously the Brown color ones but now using the newer wider Sage colored ones
    ----- I use a high quality triple layer rim liner to protect the tube from the spoke ends on the inside of the rim
    ----- I drill out the valve stem hole in the rim slightly larger and install a rubber gromite ring to protect the base of the tubes valve stem
    ----- I use the heavy duty thick wall tubes
    ----- I put Slime sealant inside of the heavy duty thick wall tubes.

    Flats are now very few and far between for me, I've even considered building a summer time commuter bike that uses those solid light grey colored rubber tires that some wheel chairs use that are solid through and through rubber and can't go flat.

    Yes, it is true that the Slime goo stuff is most certainly messy and most certainly is not a permanent fix for a puncture. BUT it will usually slow a puncture down to a slow leak that with the addition of a little air from a hand pump or CO2 cartridge filler will allow you to make it to work and back again without having to stop and tear the bike down to fix the flat right then and there (especially a problem on the rear tire). Yes it makes it a little more messy to clean up when fixing the flat correctly once you get home but for me it is worth it to still get to work on time even when I do get a puncture and then back home before I have to fix it.
     
  13. mexican

    mexican New Member

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    Thanks for the info guys!!
    The double tube sounds good!
     
  14. mew905

    mew905 New Member

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  15. Velodrome

    Velodrome Active Member

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    I've never read anything good about the airless tires here or anywhere else; but I confess to having no personal experience with them. The slime issue is contrivertial. Some swear by; it some hate it. I also have not used slime but plan to. I HAVE done the tube as tireliner using a downhill tube sacrificed around a thornproof and have never had a flat. On my "Twin" build I went with a kevlar tire liner and extra fat downhill ( DH ) tubes. Again; havnt had a flat or any kind of leak. The downhiill and thorne resistant tubes are a LOT more expensve but IMHO worth every penny. Goatherder has an excelent thread on flats and how to avoid them. I'll see if I can find it. In the mean time heres some tubes. have a look at these and yes; they are expensive. Yes they work. How much not having flats worth it ya? :) http://villagecycle.com/product/bontrager-thorn-resistant-tube-26-inch-schrader-valve-155098-1.htm
     
  16. mew905

    mew905 New Member

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    I havent looked much into them, but for those using them in applications where a flat tire would be hazardous (such as us), I thought it'd be a good choice. I plan on grabbing 3 pairs for my Moose Jaw - Vancouver tour, as riding that kind of distance I can't afford to have a flat tire at almost any point, particularly on the highway. My only issue is some of them arent rated for bicycle use, so I'm curious as to what the disadvantages are. I imagine heat would be a big one, being one solid piece, it would stretch, making the tire looser, though to the point of being dangerous is the question, whereas with a normal tire it increases the pressure in the tube, which then presses the seal on the tire tighter.
     
  17. Velodrome

    Velodrome Active Member

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    I have read very nasty things bout the semi solid tires. Like not staying on the rim at speed. HARD riding ect, ect Do your research before spending $$. Worksman sells a variant, but these are made for riding about in shipyards and huge factorys. Read very low speeds and not far and any one time. HEY Mexican! Try this with some gel insoles! Bet it rides smooth! and no flats EVER!!!!
     

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  18. mew905

    mew905 New Member

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    That image must be from a strange bike convention of some kind, the bicycle directly behind him looks like its got BMX handlebars attached to some wood with castor wheels.
     
  19. turbo1889

    turbo1889 New Member

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    Just don't use those stiff dense foam things that are suppose to take the place of a bike inter-tube inside a regular tire. Those are junk and riding on them is like trying to ride through fresh asphalt, they create like quadruple the rolling resistance.
     
  20. 16v4nrbrgr

    16v4nrbrgr New Member

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    Tire Slime cleans up with soap and water! lol

    I love how it's the pariah of the tire changer's world, in the auto tire shops as well.

    I use the offroad ATV stuff with huge 1/4" wads of lint and rubber that comes in a big jug for way too much money. It does however keep the air in my tires, and it's easy to clean up if a tube breaks and it gets inside a tire.
    Its worth the mess in my opinion.

    When you run multiple tire tubes or puncture guards you make your tires hard, which makes them ride hard and lose grip.
     

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