First build, Electra Cruiser

Discussion in 'Motorized Cruiser Bicycles' started by stickerbush, Jul 27, 2011.

  1. stickerbush

    stickerbush New Member

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    I've completed my first build and am thrilled with the results! I've not had this much fun since I started riding motorcycles 10 years ago.

    A bit about the project--the goal was to keep it simple, relatively inexpensive, nothing fancy out of the gate. I did start with a new bicycle, an Electra Cruiser that I bought from REI for about $200. I wanted a steel frame, single-speed, comfortable, fun-to-ride bicycle and the Cruiser fit the bill perfectly. The motor is the ubiquitous Grubee Skyhawk 48cc with the CNS carburetor. The first challenge was to get the motor mounted in the slightly stretched frame. For the front mount I put together a mount from Sick Bike Parts and some aluminum spacers with longer bolts (see pictures below). For the rear mount I used the parts that came with the engine kit. I fooled around with the rag joint for hours before discovering the Manic Mechanic hub adapter. Awesome product! Getting the adapter and sprocket solved all my alignment problems. I replaced the standard 410 chain with a 415 and was able to adjust it tight enough to not need a tensioner. I've not yet had any problems with the chain coming off. I added a front brake, a side-pull setup that cost about $10. The brakes aren't great but I feel like they are adequate for the speeds I'll be riding. Have to be careful going downhill though!

    The carb was a little tricky, and I'm still getting it dialed in, but it's running pretty smoothly I think. I still have some issues to sort out, the kill switch isn't working and I need to bend the muffler a few millimeters so it doesn't touch the frame, but the bike is totally rideable now. Last night I cruised around downtown Seattle for about an hour, including the acid test, a long hill (up Pike St to Capital Hill).

    I'm already thinking about my next build...



    From the left side:
    [​IMG]

    And the right side:
    [​IMG]

    The motor:
    [​IMG]

    Motor close up:
    [​IMG]

    Front mount detail:
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Dave31

    Dave31 Moderator
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    Very nice (^)
     
  3. killercanuck

    killercanuck New Member

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    Nice build!

    A quick note on your muffler. Instead of trying to bend it, you could use a round file to 'oval' the muffler holes so it'll twist out a little bit. Just a thought :)
     
  4. darkhawk22

    darkhawk22 New Member

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    Nice work on the build, nice and clean.
     
  5. cdaviesaz

    cdaviesaz New Member

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    Wow, nice build. I agree, very clean. You know, your build kind of looks like my bike's gloss-black brother!

    [​IMG]
     
    #5 cdaviesaz, Jul 28, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2011
  6. stickerbush

    stickerbush New Member

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    Indeed! Thanks for the positive comments everyone. [​IMG]
     
  7. wheelbender6

    wheelbender6 Active Member

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    Great looking motorbike without spending a ton of ducats. I would guess that you are considering fenders if you plan to keep riding in the Seattle area? Ovalizing the bolt holes in the exhaust worked wll for me.
     
  8. stickerbush

    stickerbush New Member

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    Major failure on the rocketbike today, the front motor mount broke and the motor twisted over to the side. Chain broke, locked up the rear wheel but by then I was going slow enough that I didn't go down. In addition to the mount and chain, the front sprocket cover is broken. Photos and a more detailed analysis of the damage to follow...
     
  9. killercanuck

    killercanuck New Member

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    Bummer! No damage to self is always good though. Best of luck on repairs!
     
  10. stickerbush

    stickerbush New Member

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    Here's the broken mount:

    [​IMG]

    And the busted up sprocket cover:
    [​IMG]
     
  11. Don P

    Don P Member

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    TO bad. that's a Nice build. but all part are replaceable. you half to heal. glad you were not hurt.

    damage dose not look to bad, a few dollars will fix her right up.

    just Wright it off as part of the learning curve. (I WON'T DO THAT AGAIN) lol
     
  12. killercanuck

    killercanuck New Member

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    I'm guessing the front mount didn't like extra leverage from the spacers. I just saw this thread linked in another thread. It's about stretch cruiser mounts, should be worth a read:
    http://motorbicycling.com/f6/notice-stretch-cruiser-mounts-9582.html

    The sprocket covers are like $5(should be able to re-use your cam/arm?), and your sprocket looks good still.
     
  13. stickerbush

    stickerbush New Member

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    Here's my new front mount, constructed from a piece of steel bar stock from Home Depot. I may replace the small round standoffs with a section of square 1" steel tubing.

    [​IMG]
     
  14. killercanuck

    killercanuck New Member

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    if the tubing will fit, you should go for it. Don't need the studs snapping off next(*knocks wood). Glad you're up and running again.
     
  15. jokesonu

    jokesonu New Member

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    You could also replace the standoffs by using two short pieces of angle iron drilled and spun on each other into a z shape slide them into position and weld them together and eliminate all that shim stuff on the muffler clamp as well as the engine mount. Looks to me like 1 inch angle iron would be about perfect then you could use shorter studs. If you don't have a welder bolt one angle to the engine mount the other to the clamp and slide them together and mark them and have someone buzz them together then it would be absolutely tight and perfect. And get rid of all the shims and sleeves and crap. And I'd use nylock nuts on everything.
     
  16. donphantasmo

    donphantasmo New Member

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    I love flat black bikes. they look great with a beach cruizer theme!!
     
  17. wayne z

    wayne z New Member

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    ...............
     
    #17 wayne z, Sep 7, 2011
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2011
  18. wayne z

    wayne z New Member

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    I think your new mount will be fine. Thickwall tubular spacers used like that are pretty strong and resistant to lateral forces. Very similar to the design and use of shoulder bolts used on some machine tools. Just re-tighten everything after the first run.

    If it start showing signs of trouble, I would then go with Jokes good idea with the angle irons. You could clamp them together in place, then take the clamped assy to the bench and drill and bolt them
     

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