Finally! Hello

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by 48ccFury, Apr 19, 2015.

  1. 48ccFury

    48ccFury New Member

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    It feels good to be on motorized wheels again. Back a few years ago, I bought a cheap Chinese motorcycle off a buddy. This feels similar, except it doesn't have gears.. yet!

    The break in process is mostly done already, I've ran it a couple times around the driveway and gone on some slow, breezy rides to get it going and vary the revs some.

    Biggest hiccup in the whole build? Having to put the rag joint on 3 times because I didn't pay attention to how I was tightening it. Watching instructional youtube videos and reading up on what to expect was immensely helpful.

    I attached a pic, see you all around the forums. :)
     

    Attached Files:

  2. BobbyT

    BobbyT Member

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    Welcome,
    Glad you joined. Thanks for posting the picture.
    Take advantage of the search feature near the top of the page. Most problems or questions you might have can be answered there.
     
  3. xseler

    xseler Well-Known Member

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    Howdy and welcome to the shenanigans!!

    Glad you put a front brake on that Huffy --- also, keep a watch on those fenders. The mounts fail easily and often, with tragic results.
     
  4. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Welcome to the forum. You've found the right place to share the hobby and get any help you might need.

    I'll second the fender warning. Unless the brackets and supports are reinforced factory fenders, front or rear, can cause you some serious problems.

    Good luck, have fun and ride safe.

    Tom
     
  5. 48ccFury

    48ccFury New Member

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    Thanks for the welcome and the suggestion! Last week, I ended up taking the front fender off completely because it indeed almost failed and turned into a ski.

    The motor is pretty much broken in now. I'm still using a richer mix on it because I can't yet afford a new motor if this one busts.

    My only complaint is that the exhaust is ridiculously loud at full tilt. Other than that, the bike has had zero issues and is going to be sorted out extensively in the next month or so as I slowly replace the hardware and add a few more goodies.
     
  6. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Sure glad you caught that front fender before it became an issue. However, keep an eye on the rear one too. Either front or rear can fail and get you into trouble, (ask me how I know).

    As far as the exhaust being loud, are you using the kit supplied muffler? They aren't typically loud. Some aftermarket exhaust, or modified mufflers can be annoying.

    There are many opinions on break in procedures but the general consensus is, "don't baby it". The engine needs some hard runnig during break in. Don't abuse it. No need for extended periods of wide open throttle runs, but long runs of slow riding isn't good either.

    You can do some searching for discussions on break in procedures. Read and decide for yourself what seems right and try it.

    Good luck.

    Tom
     
  7. 48ccFury

    48ccFury New Member

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    Tom,

    I am using the kit supplied muffler. Maybe it's my perception that it's loud or the fact I don't like to cruise around at 5 mph, but the shortie muffler is too loud for my neighborhood. I live right between two schools and the collective population is *older*.

    The search function has been immensely helpful. Looking at pictures of other members setups gets me inspired to make something of my own. If I can find the correct diameter pipe, I think I'll make an extension. Performance isn't the primary goal for me for once, just quiet, reliable transportation.
     
  8. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    If you've been researching you've probably seen some of the 'custom exhaust systems' that have been built by others. There have been some very innovative ideas offered up here.

    Personally I've had good luck using 3/4" EMT thin wall electrical conduit. It can be bent and welded and formed to shape around pedals, frames and rear wheels. I like to extend the pipe to the rear then weld the kit muffler on at the end. Of course this requires brackets /hangers to support the weight but if you're handy with metal that shouldn't be a problem. As for performance my bikes do just fine. I'm not out for all out speed but my long pipes don't seem to slow me down much, if any.

    Some will recommend an expansion chamber but unless muffled, which sort of defeats the purpose, they can be louder than the stock system.

    Tom
     
  9. KCvale

    KCvale Well-Known Member

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    Spiffy ride.
    Welcome.
    All you need to quite a 2-stroke down is some sound wave canceling non-restrictive muffler, this is done with a length of pipe larger that the stock exhaust pipe and simply has holes at the sound frequency to direct the pulse into some fiberglass.

    The thing is, you need a long tube with holes to get most all of the sound waves out without restricting actual exhaust flow.
     
  10. Kioshk

    Kioshk Active Member

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    Welcome! Where in NY are you? I'm in Stony Brook.
     
  11. 48ccFury

    48ccFury New Member

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    Kioshk, I'm right by the Mid-Hudson bridge. Rode across both spans today, actually.. pedaled the one and cruised the other.

    Tom, thanks for the tip on using electrical conduit! I would have never thought of that. Here I was, ready to rig some copper gas line to the end of the stock muffler and hang one of those small engine mufflers off the back of it all. Conduit is a little more workable with the right tools. Luckily, there is no shortage of earth to prevent crushing when I bend the pipe. Do you recommend a cold bend or would it be better to apply some heat?

    KCvale, I also wondered about this. My last car had a straight through that was great around town being relatively quiet (compared to the straight pipe I put on it before..) and got nice and raspy when my right foot got heavy. Combined with the suggestion of using electrical conduit, I think something really cool can be made.

    Also, it should be worth mentioning my seat failed today. It was rusty from when I bought the bike before adding the kit, but the added stress found its first victim! So a little time with a hacksaw put some key slots and a few paperclips have it feeling solid again.
     
  12. KCvale

    KCvale Well-Known Member

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    All kinds of cool things can me made.
    I used a SBP X-chamber on a build, then put a big long 'glass pack' car muffler on the end.
     
  13. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    No need for heat bending EMT conduit. It bends cold just fine.

    Unless you cheat and do what we call, 'bump bending' you're restricted to the radius of a conduit bender. If you cheat, or bump bend, you can get a little tighter bend radius without kinking the pipe. Doing this you need to take your time and bend just a little slowly. Typically though, the radius you'll get from a standard conduit bender will suffice for most bends required to build an exhaust.

    Tom
     

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