engine sits tilted

Discussion in 'Motorized Cruiser Bicycles' started by oldsurfer, Jul 6, 2010.

  1. oldsurfer

    oldsurfer New Member

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    just noticed that when looking from behind the bike at the engine...it appears to be tilted down on the drive chain side..checked the rear mount studs they are fine...is this a optical illusion? what would cause this...chain too tight? there is no way to correct this ..i mean the engine monts are cast ti the case???????????zpt
     
  2. corgi1

    corgi1 New Member

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    The chain is susposed to have a 1/2 to 3/4 inch of slack in the top chain ,roll the bike for a full wheel revolution,the slack needs to be at every point of the revolution ,,,,,,question,, did you get a motor w/mounts that fit the frame or are they over sized?
     
  3. bairdco

    bairdco a guy who makes cool bikes

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    it usually means your chain's too tight. while the mounts are cast to fit, there's enough slop where it'll move back and forth. center your motor and make sure it's tight, then adjust your chain.
     
  4. oldsurfer

    oldsurfer New Member

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    i'm using the stock rear mount and a oversized front mount..will do as you say....
     
  5. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman New Member

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    #5 Al.Fisherman, Jul 8, 2010
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2010
  6. corgi1

    corgi1 New Member

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    I understand seeing the pic
     
  7. oldsurfer

    oldsurfer New Member

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    al that was a great help...also i am going to make a torque brace
     
  8. oldsurfer

    oldsurfer New Member

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    Took The Tape Off Under The Motor Mounts..apparently The Tape Got Soft And Allowed The Motor To Slide Thover To The Left..the Frame Was Wiped Down The I Put A Level On The Head And The Side Mag Cover To Get Everything Level
     
  9. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman New Member

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    Actually that is not the way to do it. You mount the engine to the frame, not the frame to the engine. Attach the engine to the frame with the rear mount first. Adjust the height of the engine desired and then mount the front mount. Most likely a front mount has to be made/customized. I have never seen a frame with the perfect 75 degrees required to mount these engines. If you would like pictures shoot me a PM or e-mail [email protected] and request mounting pictures.
     
  10. drhofferber

    drhofferber New Member

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    wrong...my old GT frame is a perfect fit for these engines...Dennis
     
  11. oldsurfer

    oldsurfer New Member

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    That Is What I Did Al..mounted The Back First..i'm Tellin You The Tape In My Case Got Soft And Allowed The Muffler Clamp Type Mount To Move
     
  12. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    I agree.
    My first motorized bike was an 80s vintage Roadmaster Backstreeter. The front and rear mounts fit the 'V' frame perfectly with no modification...and I'm a stickler for proper/flush fitting motor mounts. That bike now has a little over 1600 miles on it with no engine movement or fastener failure. Cruisers with oversized and curved downtubes are another story.
    Tom
     
  13. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

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    I have a few bikes where the engine fit perfectly. The rest were an easy cheap fix.

    Never mount on tape or rubber. If anything a very hard rubber works, or I used lead sheet in the past with excellent results.

    There is also a cheap, easy way to fill any gap in an improper frame to engine fit- get some two part epoxy putty, the thick-like-clay stuff, and put it in the gap when you mount the engine. Use Saran wrap on both sides, so you can remove it easily later if need be. Mount the engine and tighten it 90% of the way, once the epoxy sets, snug down the hardware.
     
    #13 Bikeguy Joe, Jul 20, 2010
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2010
  14. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman New Member

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    What type of bike is yours? Mountain, Cruiser?? How about a picture?
     
  15. sradabaugh

    sradabaugh New Member

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  16. BarelyAWake

    BarelyAWake New Member

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    It is a common practice, but a flawed one. Using any soft material between the mounts and the bicycle frame in an attempt to reduce felt vibration actually only isolates that vibration to the motor itself instead of diffusing it through the frame, promoting excessive movement and contributing to fastener failure.
     
  17. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman New Member

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    Ain't that the truth...I NEVER use anything between the mount itself and the tube.
     
  18. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

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    My lead sheet did eventually loosen up or compress, but after a re-tighten, it has been fine. Still, not that many miles on this particular bike, so I would recommend the solid mount technique for now.
     

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