Dual Brake Lever - Info. 2 share

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by crzyolphart, Jun 9, 2010.

  1. crzyolphart

    crzyolphart New Member

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    Ordered a (much needed) Dual Brake Lever and mounted it yesterday.
    Should you decide to go this route; Take care to disassemble the adjusters
    and the screw that tightens it to the bars. Apply a liberal amount of
    "anti-sieze" compound to the threads and work the threads a bit to spread it.
    The adjusters are made of a very soft (cheap) aluminum and will gaul very easily.
    (like the one on my clutch lever)

    MOTOR ON DUDES! (and dudettes)zpt
     

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  2. corgi1

    corgi1 New Member

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    I am guessing that the front brake goes on the top for tighter pull?
     
  3. AslansMonkey

    AslansMonkey Member

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    Doesn't matter, the cables attach to an "evener" inside that levels out the pull.
     
  4. corgi1

    corgi1 New Member

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    I haven't got to play with one,thats good to know
     
  5. Dave31

    Dave31 Moderator
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  6. jared8783

    jared8783 New Member

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    This whole dual brake one lever idea really scares the crap out of me.

    What if there is an emergency?
    my reaction would be to slam the rear brake as hard as I can and hit the front brake a bit as well

    with this dual thing you cant just slam on the brakes without flippin over

    just my .002
     
  7. Dave31

    Dave31 Moderator
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    I think having two levers on the same side of the bars is more dangerous especially in a panic stop. Not only that you can adjust the balance of the front/rear brake.
     
  8. crzyolphart

    crzyolphart New Member

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    Hi All!
    Unlike 4 wheeled vehicles, where the front brakes do most of the work;
    It has to be the opposite on our machines. (otherwise, we'd be doing "headers"
    over the bars). When I installed mine, I adjusted the rear first, For a nice FIRM
    feel. I then adjusted the front till I got a good "assist". This puppy stops on a
    dime and gives me change back now!

    Rob (crazy-ol'-fart)zpt

    (This pic was taken before I did the brakes)
     

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  9. BarelyAWake

    BarelyAWake New Member

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    Sorry crzy - but that's simply not accurate. Try experimenting with stopping distances with just your rear brake, then just the front and you'll see the rear brake provides very little actual stopping power - it's mostly to be used in conjunction with the front for balance and poor road conditions.

    Motorcycle Braking - Motorcycle Safety Information and Resources

    The dual brake lever is somewhat problematic in that you can't alter your braking for various conditions (sand, rain etc,) so while with independent brakes I'll tend to use only the front (good conditions obv) - I've set my dual brake lever to be about a 60/40% split with the primary being the front. While I could better my stopping distance with even a 70/30% or greater - I fear the sandy corner ;)
     
    #9 BarelyAWake, Jun 10, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2010
  10. crzyolphart

    crzyolphart New Member

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    Hi Barely!
    I understand your reasoning and your explanation brought back thoughts
    and memories of my motorcycling days. (LOOOooonng gone)
    I must, however, beg to differ.
    As the link you posted states (in number 7); Toward the
    end of the stopping process, you MUST back off the front brake
    to avoid a "slow speed lockup". While using this "dual pull" setup;
    That is virtually impossible to do.Therefore I suggest setting it
    to a lesser pull to avoid that lockup. It's a compromise sort of
    thing. (like so much else we're forced to do with our machines.)
    PLEASE understand; I'm not trying to start a "pissin' match".
    I just see no other recourse.

    Rob (crazy ol fart)zpt
     

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    #10 crzyolphart, Jun 10, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2010
  11. BarelyAWake

    BarelyAWake New Member

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    No worries crzy, I figure we're jus' sharing viewpoints lol

    I gotta say that I don't think we're "differing" at this point, what you've just pointed out is one of the reasons I've set my dual brake lever to be about a 60/40% split (front primary) instead of the roughly 80/20% I'd use were they independent *shrug*

    Ya do gotta compromise somewhat with the dual brake lever - but it's not because the front only "assists" with a two wheeled vehicle (front is responsible for the most stopping power), it's simply because braking conditions are variable and the dual brake lever prevents variable use.
     
  12. NunyaBidness

    NunyaBidness Active Member

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    I've gotta say I disagree here. At this point the rider provides the variation in how they operate the brake lever.

    Before I started riding motorized bikes I rode pedal bikes for 10 years as my only means of transportation. On my non-motorized TREK i have both brakes, disc, set with the pads as close as possible without rubbing. When I have to stop I use mostly my front brake and have done 3 front wheel wheelies, in panic stops, without going over the bars. I learned how to use my brakes on my pedal bikes and I love going as fast as I can on my pedal bikes so I need to be able to stop, very fast stops at times from speeds in excess of 20 miles an hour.

    On my motor bike i have a dual pull lever and I love it. Front and back brakes, rim style brakes, I set the pads as close to the rims as I can without them rubbing the rims. I now control how hard my brakes stop me. If I am making a panic stop, my weight is shifting from the seat to my pedals and moving towards the back of the bike. If the bike starts to raise the rear wheel off the ground, I LET OFF the brakes, the rear wheel comes back down on the ground and I am at a stand still, stopped with my feet on the ground. Which is much easier when I don't have to un-clip from my pedals like I would have to also do on my pedal bike to avoid falling over.

    But, like barely stated, this is just how I do it. We are all just sharing our own personal experiences here and it's all in the hopes of furthering everyone's knowledge.
     
  13. BarelyAWake

    BarelyAWake New Member

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    I did mean variable use of the front and rear brakes independently of each other depending on conditions, not just variable braking pressure - that I think we prolly agree on :)
     
  14. AslansMonkey

    AslansMonkey Member

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    I've got the dual pull brake on all my bikes and have never had a problem, even in quick stops.

    Let's be honest here, who, in an emergency stop situation, thinks "Oh, I have to be careful with the application of my front brake so that I don't lock it up!" Everyone I know just grabs the brake and hopes for the best.

    While I agree that being able to independently control braking pressure IN THEORY gives one more control. IN ACTUAL APPLICATION that almost never happens.
     
  15. BarelyAWake

    BarelyAWake New Member

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    You're right that in an emergency stop situation there's no time to think of such things, but it rapidly becomes reflexive should you constantly expose yourself to challenging driving conditions, in actual application it provides better braking abilities should the driver be able to utilize it. This is why most motorcycles and bicycles have independent brakes to begin with.

    In "normal" driving conditions and with average drivers driving "normally" - it makes little to no difference, which is why I've got a dual brake lever on my cruiser (cosmetic concession - too many levers make it look odd), but not my mountain bike, which is also my winter driver ;)
     
  16. crzyolphart

    crzyolphart New Member

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    Oh Dear GAWD!!
    What hath I wrought?

    (the c.o.f. that started this whole thing)zpt
     
  17. corgi1

    corgi1 New Member

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    ok,just thinking(danger Will Robertson) ,,what if back behind the seat tube where the kickstand used to be there was a fork to pull out and lock the crank in place so it wouldn't turn,on the left hand side,,,now on the right side there was a foot brake set-up ,like a motorcycle,with a foot brake lever,only the toe (step-on thing)folded up like the kick-start lever on a motorcycle when you needed to pedal,,,,this could be possible
     
  18. TerrontheSnake

    TerrontheSnake New Member

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    On a bicycle you do not want to much breaking power in the front and thats all I can say I have flipped intentionaly and unintentionaly, I always use back breaks first and foremost and front last, while yes it can stop you faster it is not that safe on a bicycle. I agree with the ol phart as a matter of personal choice.
     
  19. NEAT TIMES

    NEAT TIMES New Member

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    Hi

    Using The Dual Brake With Thumb Throttle Off Of Atv, Seems To Be A Quailty Item. Have Not Heard Of Any Recall`s, Which Is A Bit Of Comfort. Have Thought Of Installing A Front Fork With Rim And Disc Brake. Hook The Rim Brake To A Left Hand Lever For Safety/backup.

    Imho Here Is A Comparison Of Adjusting One Brake Loose And One Close. If You Take A Automobile With 4 Wheel Hydrualic Drum Brakes - Adjust The Shoe`s Close On One Axle And The Brake Shoe`s Loose On The Other Axle.

    The Result Is; It Takes More Pedal Travel And Brake Fluid To Get The Slack Out Of The System. Then Line Pressure Build`s Equailly In The System. (using The Old Single Style Master Cylinder With One Plunger). Line pressure is equal. they use different bore wheel cylinders and shoe size`s to get desired results.

    The Dual Lever Brake Will Not Apply Pressure Until The Slack Is Out Of The Cables. Farracing And I Used The Dual Master Cyclinders With Adjustable Balance Bar To Regulate Brake Bias Front To Rear in our race cars. You Will Get Lapped In A Hurry Without It. Nascar, Everbody Use`s It Now.

    Remember This Is My Opinion. "I Thought I Was Wrong Once, But I Was Mistaken!". Lol

    Later My Friends. Ron .cvlt1
     
    #19 NEAT TIMES, Jun 10, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2010
  20. Elmo

    Elmo New Member

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    I keep my dual brake levers on my MB's for the reasons barely said. For a throttle I use a seperate brake lever positioned under the right lever. I have ridden bicycles without motors for many years and as barely said it is reflexive in an emergency to use a lot more front brake than rear and will stop you much faster. As for looks I really don't care if it looks cluttered. If it works well it is good. If you persist in using rear brakes more than fronts it will bite you someday when you really need to stop as fast as possible especially considering the speeds we run on these things. Another thread on this subject. http://motorbicycling.com/f3/disc-brake-17813.html
     

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