Don't like coaster brakes?

Discussion in 'Motorized Cruiser Bicycles' started by Tim_B_172, Jul 19, 2010.

  1. Tim_B_172

    Tim_B_172 New Member

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    Neither do I! I was planning on using rear disc brakes on my new build, but it turns out that I don't have room. Then I discovered this:

    V-Brake Plate by MISC

    It's an adapter that allows you to put V-brakes on any bike frame. I can't find a really good picture of it installed, but as I understand it, you bolt it on through that hole at the top to the fender mount, and then use hose clamps through the slots to fork. I ordered one, will post pics once it's installed if anyone is interested.
     
  2. CoastalCruiser

    CoastalCruiser New Member

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    Keep us "posted" :)
     
  3. chainmaker

    chainmaker New Member

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    Id like to see how this works for You, I saw this and didnt want to be a guinea pig. What kind of bike are You going to use it on ?
    Cheers
     
  4. Tim_B_172

    Tim_B_172 New Member

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    It's going on an OP aluminum cruiser. I'm also using an HD back wheel from spooky tooth, but I don't have room for the band brake (or a disc brake) and from what I've seen of these band brakes, they aren't worth a crap anyway.
     
  5. motocafe

    motocafe New Member

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    id like to see how it goes
     
  6. silverbear

    silverbear The Boy Who Never Grew Up

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    Yep, keep us posted...
    SB
     
  7. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman New Member

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    #7 Al.Fisherman, Jul 21, 2010
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2010
  8. KCvale

    KCvale Active Member

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    TIP:
    Most Beach Cruiser bikes come with an 18 tooth rear sprocket.
    Dandy to be able to pedal at 10 MPH without much 'keeping momentum' work, but they suck to get going and the high gear ratio kills the leverage to your hub coaster brake.

    Just swap that 18 out with a 19 or 20 tooth for like $5 from you local bike store, they are easy to change out but you WILL need to do chain work, like a link or link and a half added to it.

    But, the difference is staggering.
    Not only does your coaster brake now work great enough to lay down an impressive skid, you can pedal up to speed and the leverage to start your motor is about 15 feet of pedaling ;-}

    There is drawback however...
    Should you find yourself out of gas or otherwise only able to pedal power it is like a little BMX bike, you can't get any real speed and have to pedal your butt off to keep what speed you can get.

    In my book it is still a win-win-WIN cheap fix.
    That last win would be one less handlebar control and at least for me, my natural instinct to pedal backwards to stop is still there.

    One more tip...
    If you go this way you will have to mess with the pedal chain, so it is a perfect time to do some chain matching and get the tensioner off your motor drive chain.
    Even if you can't get an exact match you can put the tensioner on the pedal side if possible.

    That is not as hard as it sounds either ;-}

    You can use the kit tensioner ...

    [​IMG]

    Or get fancy with a much smaller and more eye appealing one like this...

    [​IMG]

    But regardless, in my book this is is the worst possible way to compensate for chain mismatch.

    [​IMG]

    I am not on some sort of mission to stamp out drive side chain tensioners, but when you think about it I think you will get logic and I hope that helps you.
     
  9. chainmaker

    chainmaker New Member

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    This is what I plan on doing, sizing up the chain that gets the most/heavy use (motor side) and compensating on the pedal side with the tensioner (if needed)
    Cheers
     
  10. silverbear

    silverbear The Boy Who Never Grew Up

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    Having the chain tensioned on the pedal side makes a lot of sense because the chance of disaster is now gone (no tensioner in the spokes).
    Also regarding coaster brakes... some of the old ones on vintage bikes were great. Some of the new ones on cheap imports are crap. Not all coaster brakes are the same and should not be generically condemned or recommended. Depends on the quality of the brake.
    SB
     
  11. bairdco

    bairdco a guy who makes cool bikes

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    i love coaster brakes. i love them so much, i'm putting one on the front wheel, too.
     
  12. KCvale

    KCvale Active Member

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    hahahah!
    Now THAT would be a chain matching job I would love to see!
    That pesky problem of sprocket alignment when steering might be a little problem though hehehehe ;-}
     
  13. bairdco

    bairdco a guy who makes cool bikes

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    i wasn't kidding...;)
     

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  14. WayneC

    WayneC New Member

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    I've done coaster front too. Since replaced with as S/A drum. Actually, they stop about the same!
    Not impressed with the S/A unless I just got a lemon.
     

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  15. silverbear

    silverbear The Boy Who Never Grew Up

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    Bairdco and WayneC,
    I want to learn from both of you how your are doing the coaster front brake. I think this is so neat and want to try it. WayneC, did you modify the innards of the hub? Maybe a new thread on how to do this modification could get put together, something to consolidate the information. This would be a good thing, I think.
    SB
     
  16. CoastalCruiser

    CoastalCruiser New Member

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    Actually if you want an easier pedalling bike, then either get a SMALLER wheel sprocket or a LARGER chainwheel or both as I did. 46/17 yields a MUCH better ration than 44/18. 2.7 vs 2.4. Yeah it's not as fast, but it's alot easier going uphill or against the wind.
     
  17. bairdco

    bairdco a guy who makes cool bikes

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    silverbear, after i test mine out i'll update it with detailed instructions. i'm waiting on my handlebars to get blasted by my landlord's son, and then i can put the bicycle together. if it works good, i'll let you know.

    and Coastal cruiser, that ain't right. bigger in front and smaller in back makes a bike harder to pedal.
     
  18. Tim_B_172

    Tim_B_172 New Member

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    Alright, I got my brake adapter. It looks to be pretty solid. The first pic is the adapter with its hose clamps and the brakes that I salvaged off of an old bike. The second pic shows where it will be mounted. I believe it's supposed to be mounted on the upper part of the rear fork and the top hole gets a bolt through it to that little cross bar. I'm not going to do it that way. For one the hole in my cross bar is at the wrong angle for that to work, for another it doesn't leave any room for a fender up there. My plan it to weld a steel L-bracket to the brake adapter so that the bracket goes downward. Then bolt the bracket to a threaded hole that's down there already. I'll also need longer hose clamps. All of that will have to wait until I get an engine because positioning of the adapter will depend on where the wheel sits with the engine chain on and tensioned. Also, I don't plan on using a chain tensioner on the engine side either.

    It's going to be a while before it's all operational. I'm building on a shoestring budget, but I'm unwilling to compromise on anything. That just means that it takes longer to save up and get things. ;)
     

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  19. Darth Garfunkel

    Darth Garfunkel New Member

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    I've got one of those v brake adapters. I found I had to mount it on the underside of the frame due to the curve of the top bars. It works fine though, I now have front and rear v brakes and a coaster.
     
  20. WayneC

    WayneC New Member

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    SB,
    No modification necessary on the Shimano110 hub. Bairdco linked to a post on doing the conversion
    on his build thread. The hub that guy was using does require modification in that it rachets to reset from pedal to brake. The Shimano simply rotates or rocks back and forth and the spring does the resetting.
    I don't know what the sprocket is made of. It's about a 40 year old hub off of an old Western Flyer. I wanted to drill it like baird has done to add an arm. I couldn't drill it for anything. Took it to a hardware store to get a drill bit that would go through and the helpful hardware dude offered to drill it for me. He broke his bit! I think it's made of Kryptonite! Anyway, wanting to keep it simple and use parts on hand I just used the chain as it was meant to be.
    It wouldn't stand the bike on its nose, but it was good.
    B, keep us posted on your progress, please. One thing I found. Use a brake lever with a lot of throw. Like an ATV clutch lever or some such. And the best cable you can find. If the cable is stretchy, the action won't be as good.

    WC
     

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