Chain lube and rust

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by b3anz129, Aug 31, 2011.

  1. b3anz129

    b3anz129 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2011
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    0
    I found my bike soaked this morning from an sprinkler I hadn't noticed before. I'm wondering what ramifications this might have. I know that I should probably re-lube the chains to prevent rust, do you guys have any lubing tips?
     
  2. rustycase

    rustycase Gutter Rider

    Joined:
    May 26, 2011
    Messages:
    2,746
    Likes Received:
    0
    I plan to get some White Lightning Clean Ride for my chain so I don't keep slinging oil all over the back wheel... and my rim brakes!
    rc
     
  3. Saddletramp1200

    Saddletramp1200 Custom MB Buiilder

    Joined:
    May 7, 2008
    Messages:
    1,420
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well the metal will turn sort of white. Just wipe it off. If you can let it sit till it drys. Keeping the rims clean is paramount on a rim brake bike! A dry chain wears out 10 times faster than a lubed one. Other than that your all good. (c)
     
  4. 2door

    2door Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2008
    Messages:
    16,301
    Likes Received:
    25
  5. waistofhumanspace

    waistofhumanspace New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2011
    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    0
    dance1RUST NEVER SLEEPS!usflg
     
  6. Venice Motor Bikes

    Venice Motor Bikes Custom Builder / Dealer/Los Angeles

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2008
    Messages:
    6,169
    Likes Received:
    17
    WD-40 & a good wipe down will work to help prevent rust for the whole bike... & any motorcycle shop will have good chain lube. ;)
     
  7. Dan

    Dan Staff
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2008
    Messages:
    12,474
    Likes Received:
    49
    I have to disagree with using WD40 on/near chains or any where on a bicycle, bearings or any where you need a lubricant to stay. It washes the grease away.

    WD40+bicycles - Google Search


    For chains, I use bacon grease. (I really do) It is not near as good as the fancy stuff and slings off pretty fast. But is free and really soaks in. But the specifically made for MC chains is amazing.
     
    #7 Dan, Sep 1, 2011
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2011
  8. happyvalley

    happyvalley New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2008
    Messages:
    786
    Likes Received:
    1
    Sometimes you'll see references to chains stretching, they don't, they wear and wearing is what makes them longer. Wear is caused by grit acting as an abrasive in the moving parts and heavy use of oil or grease acts as a dirt magnet.

    The best thing for all driving chain is to clean throughly and really the only way to do that is take it off the bike and immerse in cleaning solvent. I use kerosene but there are simple green type solvents as well, they just don't do as good a job. I fill a couple of screw top plastic bottles with solvent and drop the chain into them and shake it well, a first wash to get most of the grit out, then a second bottle for final rinse. I let the grit settle for several days and pour off the clean solvent and reuse it over and over.

    After thoroughly cleaning I lube chains with a homemade concoction: 4 parts mineral spirits to 1 part 30 wt motor oil. The mineral spirits act as a transfer medium to allow the flow of lube to enter the pins and bushings then evaporates leaving just a thin film of lube on the interior wearing parts of the chain, a few bucks makes a lifetime supply, the chain stays much cleaner and is easier to wash the next time.
     
    #8 happyvalley, Sep 1, 2011
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2011
  9. Saddletramp1200

    Saddletramp1200 Custom MB Buiilder

    Joined:
    May 7, 2008
    Messages:
    1,420
    Likes Received:
    0
    Back when Dinosaurs roamed the earth and 2Door & I were teens, 2 stroke bikes had automatic chain oilers. A hose ran to the motor sprocket from the main oil tank supply. Mostly on dirt bikes. It lubed the motor & chain. Mixed in the carb. A 7.00 can of motorcycle chain lube will last most riders 6 months or more. WD-40 is a wonderful lube but won't hold up but a very few miles. Great for cleaning, but wrong for drive chains. I did use it to keep the rust off of my chrome plated chain that kept my Levis up tho. :)
     
  10. 2door

    2door Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2008
    Messages:
    16,301
    Likes Received:
    25

    I think I've been insulted, but I'm too old to be sure :)

    The WD in WD-40 stands for water displacement. It works for that and some other things but it is not a very good lubricant. I've had very good luck with keeping my chains clean and relubricating them with chain saw chain and bar lube. It's rather thick and heavy, doesn't sling off too bad and for some odd reason doesn't seem to trap and hold dirt as bad as some thinner lubricants I've tried.
    Like everything else with this hobby, find something that works for you and let others do what works for them. That's why there's chocolate & vanilla.
    Tom
     
  11. Saddletramp1200

    Saddletramp1200 Custom MB Buiilder

    Joined:
    May 7, 2008
    Messages:
    1,420
    Likes Received:
    0
    Any graphite lube grease works well also. They make it now where it goes on wet and seeps inside the rollers and pins of these cheap chains. Should last a few hundred miles. More if you ride like me. Proud member of the 20 mph club. I would never make fun of old coots, they might chase me down and beat me up! rotfl (c)
     
  12. Dan

    Dan Staff
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2008
    Messages:
    12,474
    Likes Received:
    49
    Chain saw lube! I gotta try that. Really makes sense! Works amazingly well for what it was meant to do. Cheap too.

    Thanks Tom
     
  13. Venice Motor Bikes

    Venice Motor Bikes Custom Builder / Dealer/Los Angeles

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2008
    Messages:
    6,169
    Likes Received:
    17
    If you read it again... I said to use WD on the bike to prevent rust. ;)
     
  14. Venice Motor Bikes

    Venice Motor Bikes Custom Builder / Dealer/Los Angeles

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2008
    Messages:
    6,169
    Likes Received:
    17
    I wasn't talking about using it for chain lube.
     
  15. mapbike

    mapbike Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2010
    Messages:
    5,380
    Likes Received:
    1
    Another thing about WD-40 is that long term it will not prevent rust at all in my experience, I have known people that have cleaned and thoroughly coated firearms with WD-40 before storing them in a closed gun case and then in just a few months pull a rifle out and it has surface rust all over it inspite of the WD-40.

    It's good at water displacement for ignitions and such, but like it has been said by many here... isn't a good lubricant at all, the best thing for rust prevention on many things is a good spray down with silicone spray and the lightly wipe it all over evenly before it dries, this actually forms a barrier from moisture that's way better than anything WD-40 can do in my experience.

    I use WD-40 as a cleaner, starting fluid and as a water displacer but for nothing else most of the time, for a chain lube I use a quick drying spray Teflon fluoropolymer Wax Chain lube made by Dupont, it repells dust and dirt and keeps my chain in great shape in the very dusty conditions my bike are always in where I do most of my riding which is mainly dirt roads.

    Dupont Chain Saver Teflon Polymer wax Lubricant

    Product Description
    Proprietary Self-Cleaning Technology. Dry, Teflon Wax Lubricant. Will Not Absorb Abrasive Contaminants.
    Formulated for chains and cables used in high contamination or wet environments.
    Goes on wet to penetrate & evenly coat frictional surfaces with a dry Teflon fluoropolymer wax film.
    Teflon wax film will not absorb abrasive contaminants including dirt, grit, paper dust, mill powders, lint and grass.
    Surface contaminants activate release agents, causing bits of the wax structure, and the contaminant, to shed off the chain or frictional surface. This patented self-cleaning process keeps parts clean, so they work better and last longer.
    Formulated with Teflon fluoropolymer to ensure excellent resistance against water and chemical contaminants.
    Organic, non-staining molybdenum enhances boundary lubrication and delivers extreme pressure performance.
    Chain-Saver remains dry up to 120F, (48C). From 120F to 300F (144C), it performs like a conventional wet-style oil lubricant. Ideal for use in applications where:
    Chains are exposed to abrasive contaminants, where traditional oil and grease lubricants contribute to abrasive wear.
    High RPM chains like motorcycle, ATV, Kart etc, where conventional oil lubricants will fling-off.
    Chains or cables need a Teflon coating to resist chemical contaminants or water.
    O-Ring Safe.

    OUTSTANDING FEATURES & BENEFITS

    Provides long-lasting lubrication in demanding conditions.
    Reduces equipment downtime, replacement parts & labor costs.
    Ensures smoother, more efficient operation & longer chain life.
    Non-oily, dry Teflon wax film will not attract or absorb abrasives.
    Provides a clean, thermally stable barrier between moving parts.
    Substantially increases the life of chains, sprockets and cables by minimizing contaminant build-up & abrasive wear.
    Reduces chain stretching and cable slop.
    Protects against rust and corrosion.
    Will not fling o



    Peace, map

     

    Attached Files:

  16. Goat Herder

    Goat Herder Gutter Rider

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2008
    Messages:
    6,250
    Likes Received:
    2
    I use this stuff now so far its been the best thing I have come across.[​IMG] I have not tried every thing. Got a can at a yard sale a little goes a long way too. It does not fling so it has been very easy to maintain a perfectly detailed bike. I like a clean grease free bike.

    I have used the WD before as a cutting agent on a rag for detailing. Worked good. You can get children's melted crayons off the car seat upholstery with WD too. That and a wet dry vac/Steam cleaner.

    Chain Wax - $6.49 : Maxima Racing USA, - Overkill

    Oh yeah and dogs don't know? Beggin' Strips - YouTube wut? lol imagine that works pretty good. Keeps them from biting your ankles :D
     
    #16 Goat Herder, Sep 2, 2011
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2011
  17. Dan

    Dan Staff
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2008
    Messages:
    12,474
    Likes Received:
    49
    Side note and sorta related but WD40 works great to get oil or grease out of cement. In what I call my shop and what Carol calls; "I used to be able to get my car in there" if, and I do about 2ce a month, spill oil on the deck. I douse the spot with WD40 (after cleaning up the puddle) and just wipe it. The stuff is amazing at breaking up petroleum based any thing.

    First time I tried doing that, permanently scared me from using it on any thing that needs to have metal move against metal.
     
  18. Dan

    Dan Staff
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2008
    Messages:
    12,474
    Likes Received:
    49
    LOL Goat. That is a running joke at our place. Beggin' Strips - YouTube

    (I come home and smell dinner cooking. Chase Carol around screaming "Whats it say!!?? I smell bacon. I cant read!!"
    be funnier if you could see her running and slapping me away)
     
  19. GearNut

    GearNut Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2009
    Messages:
    5,105
    Likes Received:
    1
    Bacon grease specifically made for MC chains, eh?

    Now this I gotta see! ;)
     
  20. 2door

    2door Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2008
    Messages:
    16,301
    Likes Received:
    25
    Somewhere I remember seeing a long list of reported uses for WD-40 (probably compiled by the manufacturer) There were some crazy ideas on it but the strangest was the belief that it helped to ease arthritis pain when spray on joints, fingers, knees, shoulders.. I'm not sure I'd like walking around smelling like over ripe bananas :)
    Tom
     

Share This Page