chain flop

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by beentryin, May 3, 2010.

  1. beentryin

    beentryin New Member

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    ive got my sprocket perfectly straight and my problem is the top half of the chain flops real bad while in takeing off that causes my chain top pop and suggestions?
     
  2. RedB66

    RedB66 New Member

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    Are you using a tensioner? If so... roll the bike to where the top run of the chain is fairly tight and then make your adjustment to the tensioner.
    You don't want it too tight... when you roll the bike the chain should follow a straight line from the motor to sprocket.
     
  3. beentryin

    beentryin New Member

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    ive done that,but wheni take of at low speed the top half of the chain the part that pulls not the leading edge.it flops real bad up and down plus ive got kinda of a shutter on taking off
     
  4. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    If you're sure your tension and alignment is right on, you might be having problems with binding links. Try this: Remove the chain and lay it flat on a clean surface. Run your hand under it and lift looking for tight spots that do not swivel easily. Some of the kit supplied chains have been known to have tight or binding links which can cause rough running of the chain and de-rails. If you find links that do not swivel easily and you can't free them, you might want to consider replacing the chain with a good industrial #41 chain. Twisted chains are also not uncommon also. If your chain has a twist to it they are nearly impossible to make right. Not saying for certain this is your problem but its worth a try.
    Tom
     
  5. beentryin

    beentryin New Member

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    matter of fact i do have stiff links ill replace the chain
     
  6. NunyaBidness

    NunyaBidness Active Member

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    You don't have to replace the chain. A new chain may also have stiff links. You can help the stiff links get a bit more flexible by bending the chain to the side a little bit near the stiff links.
     
  7. KCvale

    KCvale Well-Known Member

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    I agree, no need to replace the chain. In fact replace the stiff link with a 1/2 link and do away your tensioner too!
     
  8. BarelyAWake

    BarelyAWake New Member

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  9. Cabinfever1977

    Cabinfever1977 New Member

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    It couldn't hurt to get a new chain that is new and oiled up.
    Check the new chain that no links are binding.

    You could also just take off the old chain and oil the links and get the links moving freely,then put back on and adjust.
     
  10. KCvale

    KCvale Well-Known Member

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    I agree completely bud ;-}
    If you have frame interference due to a short frame and/or low motor mounting you have no choice but to add something in there to re-route the chain path.

    But as far as I am concerned, anything in the drive chain path is a bad fix.
    That chain is in constant motion, and noting beats sprocket to sprocket for reliability, wear and strength.

    To me, sizing the drive chain to fit perfect with no tensioner (if it can be) first, then messing with the seldom used pedal side chain is the way to go.

    With the right combination of chain links and motor mounting you don't need one on either chain like my current build.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    At first I just threw in a link pair to the pedal chain to make it longer and put the tensioner on that side.

    [​IMG]

    But it is still a big ugly chunk of metal with a plastic moving part. At least on the pedal side wear, mounting and alignment are not a big factor.

    For this situation however all you need is a $1.99 Half-Link on the pedal chain.

    [​IMG]

    The drive chain has about 1/4" of slack with ~25 miles, the pedal chain around 1/2 to 2/3" of play.
    As the drive chain stretches from the constant use you just move the wheel back when it gets too sloppy. The pedal chain has slack to spare.

    Just my 2ยข ;-}
     
  11. Cabinfever1977

    Cabinfever1977 New Member

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    Sounds like a good idea, i might try removing my tensioner sometime and adjust my chain,sprockets and wheel. If it don't work good i can always put it back on.
     
  12. rohan3ni

    rohan3ni New Member

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    hummmm i like the idea pretty cool
     

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