Break in secrets

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by wayne z, Dec 25, 2010.

  1. wayne z

    wayne z New Member

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    Excellent article, enjoy.

    HTML:
    http://www.motortuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm
    Wayne Z
     
  2. Elitefr

    Elitefr New Member

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  3. biknut

    biknut Active Member

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    You can break in your motor using his method, but it's easy to screw it up. If you're not real good at it I'd recommend taking a lighter approch.

    Full throttle is good but only for short bursts for at least the first 50 miles.
     
  4. scotto-

    scotto- Custom 4-Stroke Bike Builder

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    The best way to break a 2-stroke in is too ride it like you stole it.........plain and simple!
     
  5. wayne z

    wayne z New Member

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    Hey, Thanks for fixing it for me.

    I broke my 2008 F-150 in this way. It had 4 miles on the odo when I started.

    I have the same Shop chang my oil every 7500 miles. They always comment on how clean my drained oil is.

    One of them drove it to the parts house one day. He said it was a lt is a lot more "peppy" than the other trucks like it he's driven.

    The article is about 4-strokes, but i'm sure it applies to 2-strokes too.

    Wayne Z
     
  6. biknut

    biknut Active Member

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    With a 48cc it's kind of hard not to isn't it lol.
     
  7. biknut

    biknut Active Member

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    2 strokes might benefit more from, or you might also say damage less using that method because of all the extra oil most of up use for break in.
     
  8. Hammond Egger

    Hammond Egger New Member

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    Thanks for fixing the link. I'll be breaking in a new GT-5 next week. Guess I'll have to pedal the bike 1/4 mile to get to where I can start it up and give it WOT.
     
  9. scotto-

    scotto- Custom 4-Stroke Bike Builder

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    The actual proper method for break-in of a Chinese 2-stroke might be this:

    Breaking-in an engine is a process of alternately heating and cooling the engine to allow all parts to properly seat themselves, and allowing 2-stroke oil from the incoming fuel to coat the interior of the engine. DDM recommends the following break-in procedure:
    Use 91 octane or higher fuel, mixed 25:1 with a quality non-synthetic 2-stroke oil. (You can use synthetic oil for break-in also. Just run slightly more fuel through the engine. ) Run the engine at varying speeds for periods of 3 to 10 minutes at a time. During this break-in time, NEVER go full throttle. Always let the engine idle for 30 seconds before turning it off. Allow the engine to cool off for 10 minutes before starting it again. Repeat this process 3 or 4 times - 3 or 4 full "heat cycles".
    After the break-in period, switch to a high-quality synthetic 2-stroke oil, mixed at 25:1. Be sure to let the engine idle for 30 seconds to cool before stopping. Be sure to follow the maintenance schedule included in your engine owners manual.

    This is instruction given off of DDM's website for Chinese 2-strokes and I think it is sound advice....use at your own risk!
     
  10. wayne z

    wayne z New Member

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    i don't trust those break in methods of DDM. Expecialy about using synthetic oils, heat cycling and never using full throttlle.
    Break'in is about seating the rings right away while the crosshatch hone pattern is rough enough to seat the rings.

    When rings are new, they don't seat their fil 360 deg circumference.
    The rings need to be LOADED with full throttle,but not high rpm, to make them seat.

    Itis well jnown in all other forums that synthetic oil will keep the rings from seating well., the stuff is just too slippery.
    If the rings aren't seated good in the first 20 miles, they will always be leaky.

    Did you read the article in the link in the first 2 posts above?. Well proven and 'splains it very well.

    I think the DDM directions are just CYA advise just like all other "factory" reccomendations for easy break
    in. They don't care about engine longivity or peak performance. They just don't want to chance novices toasting new engines.

    Wayne Z
     
  11. shearbf

    shearbf New Member

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    I have used this break-in method since the early '60s on all new motors. Taken from the"old boys" of hot roding & speed. I have never been sorry.
     
  12. Hammond Egger

    Hammond Egger New Member

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    "The rings need to be LOADED with full throttle,but not high rpm"

    How do you do that. The two kinda go together don't they.
     
  13. wayne z

    wayne z New Member

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    When I let the clutch out on my bike and immediatly open the throttle at 5 mph, it is at full throttle bue the rpm ie quite low.

    For break.in, you can use full throttle but let off before the engine reaches high rpm.

    The more it is broken in, the higher you can let it rev.

    Wayne Z
     
    #13 wayne z, Dec 26, 2010
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2010
  14. MarkSumpter

    MarkSumpter New Member

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    That in itself is one of the most telling statements of the article.

    I have built small engines, Motorcycle engines, Car and racing engines alike and have used both methods of break in depending on the engine type and what it would be used for with varying degrees of success.

    The biggest issues that causes engine failure especially during break in is improper dissipation of heat and improper clearances between working parts that cause them to either not seal properly if too great or seize if to tight.

    This being said keep in mind that a high RPM break in will generate easily 30% more heat because of the increased RPM and unless you actually know that the Journal end play clearances are to spec and that you have measured the ring end gap to ascertain the rings have enough gap to not cause them to seize in the jug it probably is a better idea to stick with a "SOFT" break in.

    Everything I have seen so far with the China engines has told me that they are really put together in a slap dash manner and little to no QC is given to them during assembly so I kind of doubt that the actually test fit rings for end gap let alone test the crankcases for seal integrity or check journal size for proper clearance.

    I will say that "HARD" break ins when successful do tend to seat rings better and will add some longevity but you will also see a higher degree if initial failures especially in crate engines.

    I think I will stick with a Soft break in for Chinas and allow the parts to wear into each other gradually.
     
  15. Goat Herder

    Goat Herder Gutter Rider

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    You have to have a engine under a load to break it in. Just revving one of these things is the worst thing ya can do to the rings, the piston rings will definitely improperly seat that way with no load.
     
  16. breno

    breno New Member

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    I do this technique also and try to give it full throttle up any hills but in saying this I also try to keep the engine under 45km/kr with the 36 tooth sprocket as I dont trust the motor yet.
     
  17. Venice Motor Bikes

    Venice Motor Bikes Custom Builder / Dealer/Los Angeles

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    This article has been brought up here a few times before... It really makes sense when you think about it!

    Most of the guys here all advise to break in a new HT engine by 'riding it normally'. (which is what I do.)
    I always advise people to make sure their engine is fully warmed up before running the engine hard; (no matter how old the engine is.)

    One last thing to consider about breaking in a engine like this is that these engines just don't rev that high when they're new. (They get faster & faster the more you break 'em in!) So you really don't have to worry about over reving that new engine while breaking it in. (Just make sure they have a little extra oil!) ;)
     
    #17 Venice Motor Bikes, Dec 26, 2010
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2010
  18. Allen_Wrench

    Allen_Wrench Resident Mad Scientist

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    Much sound advice up there. About all I could add is: it really is important to let a new engine warm up a bit first before taking off. It is equally important, I feel, to let it idle just a bit before shut down. Because I think I may touch off a whole new round of heated discussions, I don't feel like telling which break-in method I use. I have seen my pistons and can say that they haven't had blow-by. No leakin' here. I will say this: the idea is to break-in your engine in a way that works for you. By breaking-in I mean that the parts seat themselves well, either no - or limited - leakage, and that no harm comes to the engine through the process, no over-revving which, as was pointed out above, is actually rather hard to do unless you're really trying. I would figure that if you have a good, strong running engine, then you've done something right - stick with it.
     
  19. Mr.Gadget

    Mr.Gadget New Member

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    I will get the parts to rebuild my second hand engine in a day or two. I used the softer version of breaking in an engine for my first actual build, but have nothing to compair it too. It runs very strong in my opinion.
    I am thinking that if the rebuild is successful, I will try a more aggessive break in, just to see if I can see, or feel a differance. I do not have a Dyno of any kind. But I am also a difficult person to impress. So my best guess, and the use of a GPS will give me my answer.
    If I ruin an engine??????? I'll buy another one. For me this is more a weekend hobby and beer getter, than a real form of daily comuter or actual trasnportation.
    Although I have noticed that the more I ride, The less I am filling up my heated cage.
     
  20. scottmanesis

    scottmanesis New Member

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    I don't know for sure how it will pan out with these 2 strokers but here is how I have broken in every motorcycle I have ever owned.

    Start it and warm it up
    1st gear run it up til it almost hits the red line
    let off the throttle and let it engine brake to "almost" lugging
    repeat through all gears, pull over have a beverage and let it cool down
    Repeat the process again.
    Change oil....Done

    My engines have always been strong. If you break them in "easy" they fall apart when you get on them hard!
     

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