Brake Light?

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrical' started by Tool Maker, Nov 9, 2012.

  1. Tool Maker

    Tool Maker New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2012
    Messages:
    86
    Likes Received:
    0
    After reviewing the Nevada statutes it seems I need a brake or "stop" light as they call it.

    Apparently a fairly powerful one at that:

    NRS 484D.125 Stop lamps
    " (b) Display a red, amber or yellow light visible from a distance of not less than 300 feet to the rear in normal sunlight"

    So is there something off the shelf you folks are using? Or am I going to have to build something new?

    No other lights are required for daytime operation, but 2 mirrors of 7 square inches each are required.

    Any suggestions?

    B.
     
  2. GearNut

    GearNut Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2009
    Messages:
    5,105
    Likes Received:
    0
    I modified my brake levers to accommodate switches from Radio Shack.
    Here is a link to the instructables I roughly followed to convert the levers:
    http://www.instructables.com/id/Add-a-brake-light-switch-to-a-bicycle-brake-lever/

    For the taillight I used a scrap motorcycle turn signal that uses a dual filament bulb.
    I used a 6 volt LED bulb http://www.superbrightleds.com/more...ulbs/1157-led-bulb-dual-intensity-19-led/508/

    I made a 4 "D" cell battery holder for 6 volt output. It also powers my headlight too.
     
  3. bigbutterbean

    bigbutterbean New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2011
    Messages:
    2,417
    Likes Received:
    0
    Similar to gearnut, I also use an old motorcycle turn signal as a brake light, currently with an led bulb and 6v output, but soon upgrading to 7.2v.
     
  4. MitchP

    MitchP New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2012
    Messages:
    276
    Likes Received:
    0
    Try a kind of circuit placed on the V brake that is complete when the brake is squeezed. it's the principle behind my cheap-tacular Light 2000.
     
  5. Desert Rat

    Desert Rat New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2012
    Messages:
    565
    Likes Received:
    1
    Here is what I will be using, gives it that nice retro look
    12 volt 10 watt
     
    #5 Desert Rat, Nov 10, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2012
  6. bigbutterbean

    bigbutterbean New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2011
    Messages:
    2,417
    Likes Received:
    0
    I only had a second to post on this subject before, but I would like to take the time now to explain how my brake light is activated. It is a very simple setup, and didnt cost me very much at all. As I said before, I do have an old motorcycle turn signal. The body of the light is metal, and therefore grounded when bolted to my luggage rack. The light has one wire attached to it, and I connected this wire to the lead wire on my battery. I then attached a longer wire to the battery's ground wire, and ran the longer wire up to my clutch lever (I know this sounds a little strange, but I cant attach the wire to my actual brake lever). When the cheap allen bolt that is supposed to clamp my clutch lever got stripped out, I drilled a hole all the way through and used a quick release skewer with a partially broken release lever to clamp the clutch handle. So I attached the ground wire from the battery to the clutch lever so that when I squeeze the clutch lever all the way in, the end of the wire makes contact with the quick release skewer, grounding the battery to the frame and closing the circuit and thereby activating my brake light. I can still lock the clutch lever in place without the ground wire making contact with the frame. I know this may sound a bit complicated when reading it, but it is actually quite simple, and I hope it gives you an idea you can use.
     
  7. Tool Maker

    Tool Maker New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2012
    Messages:
    86
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for all the replies guys.

    It is clear that there is no single "go to" light for this with the MB crowd. Looks like I am making more parts, this project keep complicating the simple...

    I have a few Cree 2w red LED's kicking around, as well as some decent lenses. I guess I need to test a few on the sidewalk for that 300 foot range in the daytime.

    Since I would like to ride this unit to work, I need to make sure it will stand up to at least casual inspection - I pass the main yard for the Highway Patrol every day. No sense blowing in to the anthill. At least in NV it is pretty clear what the rules are.

    I am planning on a 4 stroke, so no "white wire", and I would rather not be jacking around with a lot of battery that needs a charge. I seem to spend an average of 8 minutes a day stopped according to my GPS, round trip to work.

    That means about 15 days worth of brake lights from a single 18650 battery, so I would be swapping a charged battery every two weeks. I can live with that. Hopefully the Cree LED with a 30 degree lens is easy to see from 300 feet.

    I will update when I know more.

    Thanks.

    B.
     
  8. bigbutterbean

    bigbutterbean New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2011
    Messages:
    2,417
    Likes Received:
    0
    I dont yet know how long a charge will last with my 7.2v brake light, but when I was running it 6v, I didnt change the batteries for months. In fact, I only changed the batteries once in about 6 months, and the batteries still worked before I changed them. I changed them anyway, because I didnt properly waterproof the battery pack, and it got wet. I knew that corrosion would be an issue eventually, so I took it apart, cleaned it, and installed fresh batteries. LED's do not draw much current to begin with, and a brake light is only on when you are stopping, so the batteries you use may just last you longer than you think. You said you spend 8 minutes a day stopped, but your brake light doesnt need to be on the entire time you are stopped, only WHILE you are coming to a stop. I dont think you will spend 8 minutes a day coming to a stop, unless you drive very far.
     
  9. judbgrdmchn

    judbgrdmchn New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2014
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
  10. redneck82

    redneck82 Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2014
    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    0
  11. oldpot

    oldpot New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2012
    Messages:
    159
    Likes Received:
    0
    #11 oldpot, Dec 13, 2014
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2014
  12. BikeMan2

    BikeMan2 New Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2016
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Ok I see that this is an old thread but just to try to help this is what I done for brake lights and turn signals I bought 30cm/15LED SMD 3528 Red Flexible Led Strip Light Waterproof DC 12V and then bought a Universal Motorcycle Bike Quad Pit Scooter ATV Tail Rear Brake Stop Light Switch they work great and the best you can make for the money. For my turn signals I bought 4x 30cm 15LED SMD 3528 Yellow Flexible Led Strip Light Waterproof DC12V then I bought Motorcycle triple combination turn signal switch horn headlight switch for 7/8 Bars and a 3 Pin CF13 Car Flasher Relay to Fix LED Light Blink Flash. That made up my blinkers I run them off of 8X AA DIY Battery Holder that and my relay is in a Plastic Electronics Enclosure or Project Box 4x3x1.6 in that is mounted to my Rear rack. All items can be bought on Ebay real cheap
     
    #12 BikeMan2, Jun 6, 2016
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 6, 2016
  13. Tyler6357

    Tyler6357 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2012
    Messages:
    792
    Likes Received:
    10
  14. Peejus

    Peejus New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2016
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Im working on a self contained 12v lighting system.

    So, a 12v jell cell and off the shelf automotive/motercycle lighting equipment.

    Now.. to the purpose of the the thread, im working on a LED brake light that uses a $7 harbor freight submersible trailer indicator lamp.
    The circuit is very simple.. two 4005 diodes, and a 550 1/2 watt resistor.
    Activating the brake light function is accomplished with a roller blade switch.
    So... take banded sides of the diodes and pig tail them. On one side of them, tie in the resistor, and from there the positive side of the battery.
    Hook up the negative side and the lamp should light up at half voltage.

    Now.. on the other diode, run that through the N.O. side of the switch. And hook up the common side of the switch back to the common hot wire.

    When you press the switch, the lamp will get supplied with full voltage and will be fully illuminated.
     

Share This Page