Best way to bend chain tensioner?

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by NerpAngel, Oct 9, 2009.

  1. NerpAngel

    NerpAngel New Member

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    So I have been reading around and I read how people have bent their chain tensioner thingy so that it aligns with their chain. I'm just wondering what's the best way to bend this a couple degrees? Mind you i'm not in a shop and I have reagular tools. No special heating, or anything haha.
     
  2. bairdco

    bairdco a guy who makes cool bikes

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    i think the most popular way to bend a chain tensioner is to get it caught in your spokes...

    sorry, i've had a few beers.

    here's a serious answer;

    put it on your bike where it would go if it was inline with your motor and wheel, then take a crescent wrench and bend it slowly in the direction you need to go.
     
  3. NerpAngel

    NerpAngel New Member

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    I gotta admit I laughed at your first "suggestion" :)

    Ok so just srew it on almost or all the way tight, then bend it?

    I'm just afraid something is gonna snap.. and knowing my luck with this engine kit and everything, i'll find a way to snap it..

    By the way, I got my kit in the mail last thurs so it's been a week since i've been trying to put it together and just wanting to ride the dang thing.
    I'm just getting really sad... because this shouldn't be that hard...
     
  4. jug98

    jug98 New Member

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    Put it on and ride it to a neighbor with a torch. If you need to bend right away, take it off and put it in a vise or support and use a soldering torch from the hardware store to heat it. Its thin enough where the heat from propane will help bend it. Just make a line where the bend will be and only apply the heat on that line. Then bend it in a vise using the cresent wrench. I bent something like it with a C-clamp on each end. Let it cool on its own,no water...
     
  5. xlite

    xlite New Member

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    We doe neeeeeed no STEEEEENKIN' tensioner.....
     
  6. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

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    I use a vise and a big pipe wrench.

    If you don't have the tools, try a high school shop, vo-ed school, or even a local mower shop. If they aren't busy, or you call ahead, it's usually free.
     
  7. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

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    BTW- they are soft metal, and heat is not really needed. They bend easily.
     
  8. Kevlarr

    Kevlarr New Member

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    I just used the Channel Locks I always carry on me to bend mine when I still had one. Crescent wrench would have required less grip strength though. It's just mild steel so you don't have to heat anything and you don't have to bend it very much anyway.
     
  9. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    And keep in mind the key word here is 'twist'. The chain stays on most bikes are not parallel with the chain path. The stock tensioner, when bolted to the chain stay (frame) will position the tensioner wheel at a slight angle to the chain. That is the angle you want to remove. Viewed from the rear of the bike it is easy to see how much 'twist' the bracket needs to align the wheel with the chain. Depending on the bike quality, I'd be careful trying to twist the bracket with it attached to the bike. A bench vise is the preferred method but not a tool everyone has. If you have to bend it on the bike, go slow and make sure the bracket is bending, and not your frame. Heat is not necessary.
    Tom
     
  10. NerpAngel

    NerpAngel New Member

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    Ok so i managed to twist my tension'er so that it's as straight as I can get it with my rear sprocket. I was so excited and tried to start my engine again... but about 7 good pedals down my driveway, the DAMN CHAIN SNAPPED OFF AGAIN!! AHH WHAT IS [email protected][email protected] I've tried a tight chain tension, and i've tried a loose chain tension. I just don't get this...
    Do you suppose I could make a video of what's going on with me and then I could put it on my youtube and link you guys to it? Maybe i'm not noticing something here that you guys might pick up...
    Should I do ahead and make a video??
     
  11. marts1

    marts1 New Member

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    The only thing that keeps my chain on is by looking closely to see how your chain is coming off, like inside or outside and then positioning the tensioner to offset the problem. The top view of my chain does not line up perfectly with the bottom however this is the only way mine will stay on. Got 300 miles and it seems fine so far.
     
  12. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

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    Check for proper chain alignment by looking down the chain from the rear of the bike BEFORE YOU PUT THE TENSIONER ON.
    Then use the tensioner to take up the slack in the chain. 1/2"- 3/4" free play.
     

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