Beginner fork and handlebar question

Discussion in 'Motorized Cruiser Bicycles' started by fett, Apr 27, 2011.

  1. fett

    fett New Member

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    Hi, I'm Tom. I just recently found this forum, and it's great. I've learned a lot already. I don't know too much about bikes, just that I like to ride them :p But I do have the ability to motorize one.

    I have two bikes. A generic coaster that basically looks like this. Yeah, it's a step through, but I like the look and I have it, so it's fine.

    [​IMG]

    and this bike. the magna excitor

    [​IMG]

    Among many things related to building my first motor bike, I'm thinking that I could take the magna forks and handle bars and put them on the cruiser. I figure it would help with shock absorption (cause that's what it's for :p) and maybe the shape of the bars would be better for riding?

    So, what would be the pros and cons of doing this? Sorry if this is a lame question. I'm really excited about this new project, but it is a new project.

    Thanks

    Tom
     
  2. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Tom,
    Welcome to the forum. You'll find a lot of help and advice here to get your first motorized bicycle project on the road.
    Unfortunately neither of the bikes you've shown are very good candidates for an in-frame engine mount. The step through would be the least objectionable but the full suspension one just won't work. There are options such as a rack mount, chain or friction drive. Do some research on these mounting methods.
    Good luck, have fun and ride safe.
    Tom
     
  3. fett

    fett New Member

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    Thanks for the reply. I may have been a bit confusing. I'm planning on using the step through. I've done a bit of research already, and i want to do a chain drive bike.

    I was asking if I could put the bars and forks from the suspension bike onto the step through.

    Thanks

    Tom
     
  4. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    It will depend on the steerer tube length, type, either threaded or threadless and diameter. Many newer bikes have gone to a threadless, 1 1/8" steerer tube. Older cruisers used a threaded 1" tube. There are also lengths to consider. If in doubt they aren't difficult to disassemble to check for compatibility. The handlebars/stem would stay with the suspension fork.
    You might get other replies from our experts so be patient.
    Tom
     
  5. fett

    fett New Member

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    Ok, I'll see if they match. Thanks for your help. Any idea on how switching them out would effect performance? I assume the suspension would be good, and the handle bars would mean i'd be leaning forward more. On a motor bike, I'm not sure what is desirable. I don't have my motor yet, so I'm in no hurry.

    Thanks

    Tom
     
  6. fett

    fett New Member

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    Well, i took down the cruiser with no problems. when i started on the other, i ran into a snag. It appears that the stem is welded to the fork. Everything looks straight forward, but i can't remove the parts. It is relatively cheap bike, but even so, shouldn't it be able to break down?

    I must be missing something. Any ideas? I can take a picture if necessary.

    Tom
     
  7. 42blue15

    42blue15 New Member

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    Both bikes have the same kind of stem, a quill stem. Both have a bolt sticking straight down, and the whole stem should come up and out of the fork's steerer tube after that bolt is loosened.

    If you have loosened the quill bolt a few turns and still can't budge it, try tapping down on the quill bolt head a bit with a hammer. Sometimes the wedge will get stuck in the "up" position.
     
  8. fett

    fett New Member

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    Ok. I removed that bolt entirely, and still couldn't take it apart. Perhaps the stem is just stuck in there. I may have to try some rough persuasion. Thanks.
     
  9. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    You don't need to be rough. The wedge that 42Blue mentioned is just that; A wedge. You'll see how it works after you get it apart. Loosen the bolt that goes down through it, back it out a few turns then give it a sharp wrap with a hammer. You can protect the head of the bolt with a block of wood or use a plastic headed hammer. It usually doesn't take much. You could also spray a little penetrating oil down the bolt hole. That might help a little. Whatever you do, don't beat it to death. Just a few taps should break the hold the wedge has inside the steerer tube. It is just a friction fit. Rust will make things more difficult.
    Tom
     
  10. fett

    fett New Member

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    It must be the rust, then. This thing is giving me a heck of time. I gave it a deliberate whack, and the bolt was forced down some. I'm assuming this means things are moving in the right direction, but it isn't budging much more than that. I oiled it, so i'm hoping that will help a bit. This bike is making a fool of me. Maybe i'll have some new insight in the morning
    Thanks for the help
     
    #10 fett, Apr 28, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2011
  11. fett

    fett New Member

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    i did a search and found this

    Post: #9RE: Frozen stem
    There may be one other way. I am not sure of how an Apollo is set up or made, if you can take the stem bolt completely out then try this. Turn the bike upside down with a way to support it from the handlebars from touching anything, spray it again with Liquid Wrench, find a wooden dial rod long enough to fit all the way down inside the fork tube to touch the bottom of the stem/wedge. Also make sure the dial rod is wide enough in diameter to just fit inside. From this point take a rubber mallet and hit it a few times. Turn it over again tap where the stem bolt would go. Repeat these processes a few times. My view is that if the wedge is not being held in place by the bolt and only by rust/corrosion then it will come free.

    from here Frozen stem - Bicycle Repair Forums

    and it worked. Unfortunately, i was so focused on removing the fork that I din't compare the head tubes of each bike. I found out the harder way that they aren't compatible. Darn.
    Thanks for the help.

    Tom
     
    #11 fett, Apr 29, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2011

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