An Intro and a First Build

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by chip71, Apr 3, 2014.

  1. chip71

    chip71 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2014
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello all, to give a little background, I'm new to motorized bicycles but not to motorcycles. I started riding motorcycles around '78, took some years off after high school and got back into riding around 2004. I have a 2004 YZ 250 and a 2009 Yamaha FZ1. This bike is really fun to ride and people wonder why I have a bike that goes anywhere, and another that goes well over 100 mph, did I have to have something like this? They will never understand until they ride it.

    I have been wanting to build a MB for a few years now and finally decided to get it done. I'm pretty happy with the build so far, I wanted to keep it as simple as possible with a minimalist look.

    I found the FITO Modena Sport and unfortunately bought a motor kit before I knew I could buy what I needed as individual parts elsewhere. The next build will be a better quality bike, hopefully a vintage frame. But I didn't want to wait so I got what I got. I am not that impressed with the FITO, I hope it doesn't buckle during riding. It looks good though, IMO

    From the bike, I have replaced the chain, tires, tubes, kickstand, grips and seat. From the motor kit, I have replaced the chain, chain tensioner, grips, plug, fuel lines, and kill switch wire covers. And added some sound dampening material to the right side cover. (Aluminum Peel and Seal)

    Thanks for having me, I'll be lurking and reading mostly, asking questions some.

    Done:

    • got it running

    • fitted an old maier number plate to the front for that moto-cross look I'm used to, but what I found is that it acts as sort of windshield that pushes the air down to the exhaust and away from my clothes making me less odorous as I was before the plate
    • replaced the grips with some MX grips, what I'm used to.
    • replaced the kickstand with an old one I found on ebay. It's a little short, but the bike will not fall over even if I fling the handlebars down with considerable force

    • covered the kill switch wires with paracord, wanted to do the throttle and clutch cables, but the cables were too thick

    To do:

    • springer fork on the way

    • replace the frame mounted tank with a vintage behind the seat tank setup, I already have a tank, just need to mount it
    • get a new crank to accept the vintage BMX pedals I have
    • probably need better wheels with a set that has a front drum brake
    • performance carb
    • laid back seat post
    • seat springs need beefed up
    • possible lighting solution, or at least a flasher for alerting, not really wanting to ride at night

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. chip71

    chip71 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2014
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Ok, a few thoughts after a bit of a ride.

    The front plate does not help the gas odor on my clothes like I thought it did the other day.

    The new seat is uncomfortable as all get out.

    I'm still having a mega blast with this thing, and can't wait to get it broken in and tuned as best it can get.
     
  3. chip71

    chip71 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2014
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Does anyone know how long the Histop coaster brakes last?

    It doesn't have a lot of stopping power, that's for sure. You have to stand on it down hill and if you're smart, you coast to a stop. lol
     
  4. bluegoatwoods

    bluegoatwoods Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2012
    Messages:
    1,581
    Likes Received:
    1
    Welcome aboard.

    For a first build, that's pretty advanced. Nice bike. I am sorry to hear that you don't have much faith in the Fito. Does that frame feel weak or 'shaky' to you?

    As far as the rear hub is concerned, I'm not familiar with that model. But it does seem as though some pretty cheap hubs can be made to last with some care. I'd recommend cleaning and regreasing seasonally. 4 times a year, in other words.

    To take as much stress as possible off of it you could consider adding rim brakes front and rear. That's what I've done. With the coaster plus two rims I have all the stopping power I want without 'cranking down' on any one brake enough to worry me.
     
  5. silverbear

    silverbear The Boy Who Never Grew Up

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2009
    Messages:
    8,191
    Likes Received:
    12
    Welcome to the forum. Sounds like you're off to a good start with your motor bicycle. Not all coaster brakes are equal in longevity or stopping power. The Histop is Chinese and in my opinion of poor quality. I've had two of them fail from the bearings giving out. Too few bearings and poor quality metal to begin with. If you're able to lace up a wheel then the shimano cb-110 is a good replacement. I like old Bendix coaster brakes and have had no trouble with them.
    SB
     

Share This Page