Advice for them as likes to replace bucking bars

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by crassius, Jun 15, 2014.

  1. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

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    For them as likes to replace bucking bars with a length of hardened bolt, please do yourself a favor and use the shoulder part of a shoulder bolt. Opened one today (that also wasn't getting much grease in the area) that had a threaded bolt in there. Bolt was nicely finished at the ends, but the shaft had worn large enough to get your pinky finger in there. Shaft also was scored with grooves that looked the same spacing as the threads on the bolt. Looks like those threads chewed it up pretty good.
     
  2. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Good advice, crassius. Thank you. Bolt threads have no place in the clutch shaft bore.

    Another alternative to a shoulder bolt is the shank of a 5/16" or 8mm drill bit. Yes, they're hard to cut; you'll need a carbide grinding wheel, but the hardness makes them a good choice for long life. Proper lubrication is critical. I've heard some say they use oil or, heaven forbid, WD-40 to lube those clutch actuating parts. A good grade of bearing grease should be used.

    Smoothing and even polishing the ends of the bucking bar will also help reduce clutch pull force. The ramp of the cam in the cover should also be rounded and smoothed for the same reason. The smoother those parts, the less force required to disengage the clutch.

    Tom
     
  3. maniac57

    maniac57 Old, Fat, and still faster than you

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    I use the blank end of a drill bit. You can easily cut them with a angle grinder and a standard grinding wheel.
    Just keep dunking it in water so it never gets red hot and loses it's hardness.
     
  4. curtisfox

    curtisfox Well-Known Member

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    One of the finest oils on the market is automatic transmission fluid, I have mixed it 50/50 with STP. A little dab will do ya. Also I have bought drill rod stock that I use ( got mine from use-Enco.com ) can be worked and headed after .........Curt
     
  5. Davezilla

    Davezilla New Member

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    Definitely good advise, I was going to recommend drill rod stock because it's a harder steel and it already has an accurate and smooth finish.

    Automatic transmission fluid is an excellent oil and it's also an excellent cleaner when you got grease and road grime covered parts, just scrape off most the caked on stuff and soak overnight, the parts will be clean as new after teh ATF is washed off, longer soaking may be required if the parts are really badly caked with old greases etc, but it will clean it... Good for cleaning bearings and the internal clutch parts.
     
  6. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Did I misunderstand? Curtis, are you saying you use ATF as a clutch actuator lubricant, or a cutting oil when cutting drill rod? I'm confused.

    Me gut feeling is any oil based lube won't be sufficient for the clutch. There's a lot of force on those moving parts when the clutch is disengaged. But, if it works for you.............:)

    Tom
     
  7. Davezilla

    Davezilla New Member

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    ATF does work good for cutting too... but I'm thinking he's talking about using it as a lube since he mentioned mixing it with STP which is nice thick and sticky.... I use STP during engine assembly because it'll stay put until the oil pump takes over
     
  8. curtisfox

    curtisfox Well-Known Member

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    As a lubricant mixed with STP can't get any better oil. Can't beet cutting oil for cutting

    Another use for ATF is up here in the cold country they use it for hydrolic fluied,very little warm up time. A lot of loggers and skid loaders use it, although it likes to find leaks easier............Curt
     
  9. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    LOL, I know I'll catch heck for this but most of you know I'm a devoted fan of Opti-2 for my two stroke mix. However I've been using it for quite a while for other things too. It makes a great chain lube. It works fantastic in small electric motor bearings. Hedge trimmer blades, squeaky door hinges, and about anything that you'd lube with oil. Never tried it on my clutch actuators though.

    Thanks Curtis. I might have to try your ATF/STP trick. Sounds interesting.

    Tom
     
  10. Davezilla

    Davezilla New Member

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    I just ordered me a 32 oz bottle of opti2 so I'll give those ideas a try as well... It's amazing how many uses ATF and WD40 have,but I can see where a good 2 cycle oil would work in those areas as well since it has to be able to protect the moving parts with such a small amount in the fuel...
     
  11. curtisfox

    curtisfox Well-Known Member

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    Remembered another for ATF mix it 50/50 with Acetone and you have on of the better penetrating oils out there.......Curt
     
  12. mapbike

    mapbike Active Member

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    I use a mix of ATF and Acetone mixed 50/50 for gun cleaner oil, it will clean the dickens out of rifle or pistol bores and leaves a good rust prevention lube film behind after being only swabbed with one or two clean patches.

    By the way, instead of using high dollar diesel fuel additives many old truckers and fellas running diesel tractor around these parts pour in a quart of ATF when they fill up every now and then and swear it is the best thing you can mix in the diesel fuel to prevent injector issues, I know people who have been doing that for many years and swear by it, even some of the older mechanics swear by it for a diesel fuel additive instead of some of the other snake oil marketed for diesel engines.

    If I were gonna use STP for the clutch actuator shaft I'd just use straight uncut STP, it is gonna be stickier and stay put even better than it would being thinned down, personally I will just keep using a high quality Moly based grease for mine, it will out lube ATF or STP under high stress conditions and stay where it needs to be, but hey if someone likes the STP and ATF I say go fur it, if it works for ya.. it works for ya..

    Map
     
    #12 mapbike, Jun 17, 2014
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2014
  13. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    I've seen windshield washer fluid used in place of a product called 'Heat" in diesel engines. Before I retired, the people who used to service our emergency generators kept gallons of washer fluid on the trucks to add to the fuel tanks in winter. Got my attention when I first saw it but they swore by it and we had a full service contract so if the engines messed up, they were responsible for them.


    STP: LOL, I once worked for a Chevy dealership. They used to add STP to noisy differentials in the used cars. Made them quieter, that's for sure. At least until they were out the door. And, an old mechanic once told me that 'back-in-the-day' they used to mush up bananas and fill a noisy differential. He swore it kept them quiet. Now that I think about it, doesn't WD-40 sort of smell like over ripe bananas? :)

    Wow, talk about highjacking a thread..................

    Tom
     
  14. mapbike

    mapbike Active Member

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    LOL....

    I knew an old used car dealership that put sawdust in loose whining diffs back in the day, some people bought cars from him that were later found to have sawdust in the diffs after a major failure...

    And on the WD-40 subject... since we are highjacking the heck outta this...LOL

    Most people that use WD-40 are unaware that it isnt a lubricant but rather a water displacement W for water & D for displacement... you can spray bare metal down with WD-40 and I think it rust quicker than it would have if nothing at all had been used on it in my experience, I've seen guns that were sprayed and wiped down with it and then later taken out of the case with rust all over the barrels, it is good stuff for what it's made for but it was actually never intended to be used as a oil type lube, I use it mainly to clean with since it will help get tar and grease off of your hands and other things, but for loosening rusty bolts or nuts it stinks and for protecting against rusting it stinks in my experience. a silicone lube is best for rust prevention and oil and grease is best for lubrication, WD-40 isn't a good lube at all accept maybe to stop a squeaky door hinge or a temp squeak stop on the control arm bushings on an old car or truck, ask me how I know this one...LOL

    http://wd40.com/about-us/history/

    Map
     
  15. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Locksmiths love WD-40.
    People spray it into the locks then a few days later the lock stops working. Especially in a dusty atmosphere. I had a locksmith tell me one time that if it wasn't for people using WD in their locks he'd loose half his business. He was being facetious of course but he was making a point. Never never spray WD in a padlock, door lock, ignition switch or any type of keyed mechanism. You'll regret it.

    Like Map said, it has its uses but locks aren't one of them.

    Oh, and sawdust probably predates bananas :)
    Tom
     
  16. maniac57

    maniac57 Old, Fat, and still faster than you

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    I routinely found cars with the diff stiffed full of sawdust to quiet it down in Chicago...found a trans full of it once.
    Couldn't believe it still moved but it did.
    Pan looked like it was full of red velvet cake.
     

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