70's Stingray build

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by zeeohsix, Jul 6, 2012.

  1. zeeohsix

    zeeohsix New Member

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    Howdy guys.

    I first got into this stuff by watching Motovelo's stuff on Youtube and fell in love with it. I got to talking about it with my friend one day, and told him how much I had always wanted to do a motorized Stingray build. Now, the Stingray I had in mind was the new-age OCC Stingray Chopper. My friend, though, had other ideas, apparently. When I told him I had this idea for the build, he said, "hey, I've got a Stingray buried in my shed", to which I was ecstatic about, thinking of that OCC Stingray I had always wanted to build.

    Well, we got to his house and dove into the mechanical abyss that was his shed. After much moving around, we unearthed the bike, hiding in the back corner under what appeared to be an old riding mower. It turns out that it was not an OCC chopper, but an old Schwinn Stingray knock-off. I'm not one to quit just because of a small snag, so I looked at the bike to see what I could do with it. It was covered, and I mean covered in rust, the chain looked like it was made of rust, the back tire was dry-rotted, the front just barely holding on, etc.

    However, there is a light at the end of the tunnel in this story. Some blood, sweat, and tears, a few months and roughly $200 ($130 for the motor kit, $20 for a steering repair and $50 for a tire, tube, and rear hub rebuild) later, I have a running 80cc 2 stroker bolted to the old fish. And boy, does it go (30-35 on a single sprocket, right out of the box).

    It does have a few problems, though. I'm working on the brakes (of which it currently has none)--I'm either going to have to get a new pair of sneakers or a brake, but something has to be done. I had to pull the pedals and the old crank 'cause it was getting in the way of the motor (I also had to redesign the motor mounts, rotate the head and custom fabricate a right angle intake manifold), so I need to create some sort of foot peg setup. I'm going to put a headlight on it (the motor has a 6V generator built in) and somehow going to attach the digital tachometer I built for the science fair all those years ago.

    So, all of that being said, these are the issues I have as of now:

    -brakes (I'm working on this one; I think I've got a solution but I'm open to suggestions)
    -hooking up my tach to the coil (I want a setup where it counts a rev every time the plug fires)

    I also may have an OCC donor in the near future. Any info on that build?

    Lastly, I leave you with this token: This was me this morning brnot
     
  2. MotorBicycleRacing

    MotorBicycleRacing Active Member

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  3. zeeohsix

    zeeohsix New Member

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    Thanks! I'll get on that right away. I also have some vids that I'll put up on the 'Tube and post links.
     
  4. zeeohsix

    zeeohsix New Member

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    This is all I've got for right now as far as pictures--the rest are on my other mem. card. Sorry for the poor quality (phone picture) but I will be sure to dig up some better ones soon.
     

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  5. Greg58

    Greg58 Well-Known Member

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    Are you planning on a wider crank? I would if I were you, if something goes wrong you can always pedal. Some say its too hard to pedal with the drag of the engine chain and clutch but I carry tools so I can remove the chain. I run a bmx side pull front brake to assist the rear coaster, 96mm reach will work with 2.125 tires.
     
  6. zeeohsix

    zeeohsix New Member

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    Hey Greg,

    I had originally intended for pedal power to be available as well, but there's just no room for it. The back of the seat is supported by the sissy bar so having the sissy bar mounted is a must--the problem is is that with the sissy bar on it, I barely had enough room on the threads to get the alignment on the rear sprocket right, and that was a pain itself.

    The original coaster brake and hub were messed when I got the bike, and I was originally planning to use a disc brake, so when I had the hub rebuilt I told the guy to forget about the coaster because I wasn't planning on using it. To be completely honest I'm not sure what he did with it, as far as whether or not it's still in there, but I've got it set up right now and it's working so I'm not looking to pull it apart.

    It has a mount for center pull rear rim brakes. Unfortunately the front has nowhere to mount brakes to, but I'm not entirely opposed to drilling holes in the frame if anyone has any ideas (steel frame--won't do any harm to have a few holes).
     
  7. Greg58

    Greg58 Well-Known Member

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    If I understand, you have removed the pedal side rear sprocket. So now you have to push the bike to start it, I'm all for exercise but am too old to run beside my bike!
     
  8. zeeohsix

    zeeohsix New Member

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    You understand correctly, sir! I did remove the pedal side rear sprocket, and I do have to push the bike to start it. However, I live on a slight hill so all I have to do is push the bike a little bit and gravity takes over the rest on the way down the driveway. As far as when I'm on a flat surface, being 18 does have its advantages!

    I also found out today that slipping the clutch with too much gas results in this: .duh.
     
  9. zeeohsix

    zeeohsix New Member

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    *UPDATE*- As of about a week and a half ago I now have brakes on the bike. It's a regular center-pull rub brake, and surprisingly works pretty well. I have to plan my stops in advance (let the motor wind down then use the brakes at a low speed) but it works pretty well even in a relatively high speed, sudden stop. I found this out as I was riding through my neighborhood the other day when a woman in a van ran the stop sign. I hit the brake, pulled in the clutch and revved the piss out of the poor little 2-stroker (seeing as though I didn't have a horn). Finally got the woman's attention, and she stopped in the intersection. I shook my head at her, slipped the clutch and pulled the front wheel off the ground past her.

    After that ordeal, everything was fine for a while, and had some interesting times with the bike (including some kid on a 125 dirt bike wanting to race, and I went for it--I'd be lying if I said it wasn't entertaining http://motorbicycling.com/images/smilies/brnot.gif). Alas, all good things must come to an end. I had my first breakdown the other day riding down my street. I was just riding normally and all of the sudden I heard a BAM like a backfire, and my exhaust got very loud. Now, having taken the baffle out before I knew exactly what happened. The muffler kicked the baffle out, but only this time it came out with the mounting stud! The cheap weld on the stud (which is nothing more than a long machine screw with a round metal piece spot welded to it) broke. I liked the power increase with the baffle out, and it sounded cool, but it just gets annoying after a while and I'm not looking to have the neighbors call the cops seeing as though it's not registered and not street legal at the moment. I think I'm going to just have the baffle welded onto the muffler directly and maybe upgrade in the future to one of those chambered exhausts from SBP or Motovelo.

    Also, an update on the OCC project. A family friend who has a bicycle and car graveyard in his backyard gave me the go ahead to go "dumpster diving" and said anything I found I could have, free of charge. Among this was, believe it or not, a pristine OCC chopper! So now I sort of (I've seen it, but unfortunately I didn't have the vehicle at the time to actually take it home) have a donor bike for my OCC project. I'm planning to run a Lifan 125cc single with a kickstart and a built in 4 speed tranny (1 down, 3 up), with a custom dual exhaust (y-pipe coming off the muffler welded to 2 header pipes--unnecessary and heavy but it sure would look cool). It's gonna be wicked fast when it's done. I don't think rub brakes are gonna suffice for this one, though--I'm gonna have to see what I can do about fitting at least one disc on there.
     

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