#41 chain

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by am21, Aug 10, 2009.

  1. am21

    am21 New Member

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    So my stock chain that came with the kit broke off last week after about 200 miles of use, and ive read all the posts about the 41 chain so i went out to my local tractor supply co and bought the 10ft, no i just spent an hour trying to get a pin out so i could fit the chain, i have a park chain breaker tool and it would just not do it, it keep slipping off, i even tried use a dremel and a drill to give the pin on the chain a more grip but couldn't get it. in all my effort the pin maybe moved a 1mm, does any have any advice on how i should go about breaking the chain?
     
  2. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Grinding the end of the pin completely off helps. Grind it flush with the side plate then use a small punch and hammer. You need to support the chain level so you don't pound a kink into it. A 3/32" punch is what you'll need but some guys even get by with a nail. A general rule of thumb: The better the quality of the chain you have, the better quality chain breaker you'll need. Some of the cheaper dept. store breakers just won't work on a well built chain. They bend or break before the pin moves. I'm not familiar with the Park breaker.
    Tom
     
  3. HoughMade

    HoughMade New Member

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    Place a link over the hole of an old, smaller socket. Use a punch or nailset to drive it out, and back in when necessary. I've done this....well, too many times to count. I've never had to grind anything.
     
  4. Humsuckler

    Humsuckler New Member

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    wrapping the chain around a sprocket is a nice tip.

    grinding it flush is definitley the easiest way of getting it out, but you cant drive that pin back through (since its short) you would need to punch 2 pins completely out in that case and use a master link.

    FTR i think its stupid that there isnt enough room to install a chain without breaking it.... makes me wonder if anyone has cracked a case yet when their chain broke and whipped the backside. i wanted to put a casesaver in jsut in case but there is NO room for that lol
     
  5. Buddy

    Buddy New Member

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    I've found the easiest way is to just use a small socket, just a little larger than the pin to set the chain on then pound the pin as far through as it will go just using a hammer, then use a punch or something similiar, I use an old philips screwdriver ground down to the right size, to punch the pin rest of the way through.
     
  6. Humsuckler

    Humsuckler New Member

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    the socket tip is also something i never thought of before!
     
  7. am21

    am21 New Member

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    thanks for all the replies, i didnt have an extra sproket laying around so wat i ended up doing was taking some metal strips that had holes for nuts to go through as my base anad i tried using a hammer and a nail but after abut 15 min and hardly any succes i went back to the dremel and made the pin flush and tryed my chain tool again and after a couple of trys of turning the screw on the tool as hard as i possibly could i finally got it =), the #41 chain runs so much better then the orginal, i wish i had put it on to begin with
     
  8. perkoff

    perkoff New Member

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    I have the same tool, breaking the chain was easy enough. I know the tool really isn't big enough for the chain but I just shoved it in and started turning. The hard part is getting it back in. The pin was sticking out and I had to tilt it in at an angle. It took a few tries but I got it together and the pin pushed the other side of the chain out so I used a pliers to snap the chain together and it's been working really good. I didn't want to use the master link that came with it.
     
  9. perkoff

    perkoff New Member

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    It's a tight fit but I managed to shove the number 41 in the chain breaker.
     
  10. Norco John

    Norco John New Member

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    A bicycle chain breaker's not really big enough to break #41 chain. They sell the proper tool at TSC for about $35. Yeah, pricey, but considering that you trash the light-duty breaker breaking the big stuff and it's then junk, you don't have to break much #41 before $35 seems like a bargain.
     
  11. silverbear

    silverbear The Boy Who Never Grew Up

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    I'm sure the small socket under the chain works better than what I was doing, but it worked anyway. I lay the chain out on a two by four and drill a small hole in the wood... lay the link pin directly over the hole and use a punch and hammer. A few whacks and she's out. I'm thinking that a hole drilled larger to receive an old socket or similar (even a nut would work) and I'd have a chain break tool of sorts. I can also picture wood or metal adjacent to where the chain would lie to make a little channel of sorts for the chain to sit in so that it is easier to focus on the punch, hammer and fingers. I think I'll try that next time there is a need. Thanks for the socket idea.
    Silverbear
     
  12. perkoff

    perkoff New Member

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    The cheap one they sell at Wal Mart sucks, I broke 3 of them. The park tool one is pretty durable, I used it on a number 41 chain, it was a tight squeeze but I got it to work.
     
  13. popcornsutton

    popcornsutton New Member

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    Problem is, breaking chain is a real pain no matter what tool you use. I use one from TSC and have never had to grind a chain yet. I often end up gripping the link with vise grips and twisting back and forth to finish pulling it out. The problem seems to be that the pin pusher in most or all breakers is always a bit too short. One way of extending the reach of the breaker's pin is to get the pin started, back off, put a tiny ball bearing in the hole, then resume pushing it out. The bearing will extend the breaker's pin reach.
     

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  14. matt167

    matt167 New Member

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    I don't have a breaker.. pin punch, grinder and a vice is all I use
     
  15. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    I'm not sure why the issue of grinding the pin is such a big deal with some of you. You're not going to use it again as long as you use a master link so what's the problem with grinding the pin? It makes removing it ten times easier and you don't run the risk of bending or kinking a link with a hammer, punch, vise grips, needle nosed pliers, etc.. Grind the little sucker off, punch it out and throw it away and use a master link and be done with it. I don't own a chain breaker and wouldn't waste my money on one. I don't need it. I work in a place that has miles of conveyor drive chain, all sizes and the mechanics who maintain the equipment don't break chain. They grind off the head of the pin, punch it out and install a master link and get the production lines running again. Why are you trying to save the pins?
    Tom
     
  16. matt167

    matt167 New Member

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    takes me about a min to punch a pin.. not including the time it takes to pull out the dremel.. but once it's ground, it's so much easier.. once the pins are pushed out there no good anyway
     
  17. fall_down_stand_up

    fall_down_stand_up New Member

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    I took my chain down to the local kawasaki shop and they poped a few links out in 10 seconds(no charge)....Simple,quick and easy....end of story....
    Johndnut
     
  18. xlite

    xlite New Member

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    Not true. I've had a couple master links fail over the years but not one of the dozens of pins pushed back in.
     
  19. matt167

    matt167 New Member

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    pushed all the way out I mean.. if you push it out enough to seperate the chain and fix it, then it can be pushed back in..
     
  20. xlite

    xlite New Member

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    I'm not sure it makes any difference. Once you remove the "lip" by pressing out (and there is a lip/mushroom contrary to what many say here) it theoretically should go in and out easier. IMO it's so hard to push back in though it will probably stay there. And experience backs that up.

    I'm sure after dremel it will never be secure again which is why I never do that. Big pain too.

    Master link is mostly a matter of conveeeeeeeenience but not so reliable as just pushing the pin back in. I do both depending on time and tools.
     

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