4 stroke frame suggestion

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by wmd239, Aug 24, 2010.

  1. wmd239

    wmd239 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi Folks,
    I have been researching motors and setups & have decided on a EZM four stroke motor with the centrifugal clutch.

    Now my question is about frames, im looking for a strong & dependable (preferably steel) frame that will take abuse and me not having to worry about the frame failing somewhere when im buzzing at 35mph.

    i would also like a frame with a steering wheel tube that is largest enough to fit larger mountain bike size shocks and tires.

    Ive heard good things about the worksman frames, but not quite sure if they will fit the bigger four stroke motor or bigger shocks.

    if you guys can shed some light on my best options and share your experience it would be much appreciated..xx.
     
    #1 wmd239, Aug 24, 2010
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2010
  2. silverbear

    silverbear The Boy Who Never Grew Up

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2009
    Messages:
    8,188
    Likes Received:
    10
    Two photo below. One is of a Worksman with a 2 stroke motor. There was barely enough room to fit it in there and I had to use an offset intake manifold. No way will the EZM motor fit without modifying the frame. If you wish to go that route, PM Tinsmith as that is what he is doing and is installing an EZM kit. The other photo is of a Schwinn straight bar frame (50 Panther) with heavy duty wheels. Look at how much more room there is. I'm doing that build next with the EZM tranny and probably a HS engine. I know it will fit without frame modification. I personally would pay more for a Scwinn straight bar frame than I would for a Worksman NB and I think it is made just as well if not better than the Worksman. I like my Worksman, but man it was a lot of work. The Panther will be plug and play.
    SB
     

    Attached Files:

  3. wmd239

    wmd239 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the feedback silverbear. I like your idea about the panther & once i started looking into them i found out how hard they are to find.

    a few questions for ya; will that frame fit bigger size mountain bike tires? also what about high quality shocks, i heard the steering tube needs to be a bigger size?

    also do u or anybody else use Grubee frames?
     
  4. silverbear

    silverbear The Boy Who Never Grew Up

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2009
    Messages:
    8,188
    Likes Received:
    10
    Don't know about the Grubee frames. Panther frames (Hornet and some DX use the same frame) do come up on Ebay. A whole bike can be expensive but just the frame isn't too bad. A modified Monarch springer front fork from Venice bikes is the ticket for the front end and new Wald fenders (bikeworldusa), new heavy duty wheels from Husky or Worksman and you've got a heck of a bike which will accept the EZM setup, something much like the old Whizzers in quality and power. If you want a custom in frame tank, sportscarpat makes them for both the Panther and for the Worksman. Goosenecks are just Wald anyway. Hope this helps.
    SB
     
  5. silverbear

    silverbear The Boy Who Never Grew Up

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2009
    Messages:
    8,188
    Likes Received:
    10
    I forgot, you asked about tires. What came on the Panthers were 2.125 balloon tires. The frame might accept 3" fat franks, but the drive chain could be an issue with fatter tires than stock. I tried just sitting on and rolling both bikes before I changed the seat on the Worksman to one with a reversed 7 seat post, a 41 Elgin seat, and I found the frame felt better, more right on the Panther. I'm 6 ft. 200 pounds and the Panther is just right. I know I keep going on about it, but I can see more Panthers in my future. I don't know about the Worksman. I guess it also depends on whether or not "this is my bike" or if it is made to sell to someone else. If it is for you and you have the time and are willing to invest some money in it, which I guessing is the case or you wouldn't be using an EZM setup in the first place, then I think it makes sense to do it right. I want this Panther to be my daily rider, to make it up hills, to be a reliable "easy rider". Whatever frame you choose, I think it should be right for you.
    SB
     
  6. wmd239

    wmd239 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    is the panther pretty similar to the schwinn typhoon?

    one problem i think im gonna run into is these old frames only have 1" steering tube, i have some nice rock shocks but they are 1 1/8" steering tube.

    does anybody make 1" mountain bike shocks?
     
  7. scotto-

    scotto- Custom 4-Stroke Bike Builder

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2010
    Messages:
    6,530
    Likes Received:
    6
    This one's not steel, but it accepts 1-1/8" threadless steerer tube forks and will also accept 1-1/4" head sets.
    [​IMG]

    The old Schwinns are 1" head sets, thus making it difficult to run a newer model suspension fork, without somewhat major modifications. Best bet is a springer fork or an older model suspension fork for the old Schwinns with the 1" head tubes.
     
  8. silverbear

    silverbear The Boy Who Never Grew Up

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2009
    Messages:
    8,188
    Likes Received:
    10
    Regarding the Typhoon frame. I had a Typhoon middleweight once and it is a different frame design. Cantilever, so it is a whole different critter. The straight bar frame is I believe strictly on the older heavyweight bikes (balloon tire 2.125). The Typhoon I had came with 1.175 tires. The straight bar frame was found on some of the Autocycles, Motorbikes, Hornets, Panthers and some of the DX models.
    SB
     
  9. wmd239

    wmd239 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    What type of frame is that scotto? that is a nice looking setup, since it is aluminum do you worry about the frame breaking or does it feel like a strong & solid frame?
     
    #9 wmd239, Aug 26, 2010
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2010
  10. Whizzerd

    Whizzerd New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2009
    Messages:
    101
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you're willing to search, occaisionally U can find MTB shock forks w/1" steerer on ebay or RST makes one that U buy seperate steering tube and screw in. 1" is available. SB's suggestion on Venice's unit is a good one especially for a retro look on old frame. Springer forks are available with 1" or 1.25" steerers. The Sunlite brand Springer is what came on my new Worksman and is a nice unit. Wanna talk front brakes next?LOL
     
  11. ElMicNip

    ElMicNip New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2010
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have a cantilever beach cruiser and also am having a difficult time finding suspension forks of decent quality with a 1" steerer. I believe RST is the only company to offer separate steerer and fork. bikeman.com has a few RST forks and steerers. I was curious if anyone knew the process for installing a steerer? I have read that to remove a steerer requires a 4-6 ton press, but what about installation. I was wondering if its possible to inslall at home with maybe a vise a mallet. If not, do bike shops generally have the ability to install one.
     
  12. worksmanFL

    worksmanFL New Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2010
    Messages:
    579
    Likes Received:
    0

    Hi WMD,

    Im not sure if this will exactly answer you question, but post #31 goes over bike options, which was what I was asking about within this thread:

    http://motorbicycling.com/f37/cranbrooks-suck-20783-4.html

    I found the info. veeery helpful.

    Good luck with your build!
     

Share This Page