250+ Lbs frame and wheels recommendations

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by Master-shake, May 30, 2013.

  1. Master-shake

    Master-shake New Member

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    Hey guys this is the shake here,

    I've been trying to start selling these motorbikes as secondary set of income. I like talking to the customers and what not, and I got this one that has a little weight issue that they are currently working on. They can't drive a vehicle for reasons I'm not willing to disclose. Basically, we have a big 5'2" person who needs a little info with regards to weight limits on these bikes.

    I can build her one, but I need to know if any of you guys have any keen insight on the tires/frames/rims I should avoid entirely or look more into. I've been told that my jet black moto can carry 240lbs up a hill somewhere but I don't wanna extend this statement to a customer at 275.

    Any tips, advise on tires or frames to be looking out for?

    Is she gonna need some special tires or what?

    Budget is looking from 500-1000.

    Links appreciated.
     
  2. Highwaystar

    Highwaystar Member

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    Worksman wheels and a big rear sprocket.
     
  3. wheelbender6

    wheelbender6 Active Member

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    Husky makes good wheels too. I think most any frame is strong enough but it's probably better to go with steel.
     
  4. Kioshk

    Kioshk Active Member

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    Me+backpack+bike = 340 lbs.
    Walmart Two Nine = $200
    X80 Kit = $140
    56T drive sprocket = $20
    Cruises @ about 23 MPH
    Mount the engine properly; aluminum's plenty strong.

    P.S.:
    step-ladder = $10 (so shorty can mount the bike)
    comfort-seat = $25 (for her large posterior)
     
    #4 Kioshk, May 30, 2013
    Last edited: May 30, 2013
  5. maniac57

    maniac57 Old, Fat, and still faster than you

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    I agree with Kioshk. A decent set of alloy rims should hold up just fine. I have untold miles on mine and I am usually 250-275 lbs...plus I've been known to carry a #85 lb welder in the basket. I've gone through many tires but never had a rim issue. I use a stock ragjoint properly setup and have never broken a single spoke or bent a rim. A sprocket adapter is the easiest way to get a reliable driveline, but the stock parts work fine if correctly assembled.
     
  6. Moto

    Moto Member

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    All that said I would go with a high quality STEEL frame from a reputable seller. (And good brakes - especially if she isnt used to riding a lot)
     
  7. 5-7HEAVEN

    5-7HEAVEN Well-Known Member

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    Maybe this short, heavy person would be more comfortable on a three-wheeler.

    No disrespect meant whatsoever. Just trying to help find something that'd work for her.
     
  8. racie35

    racie35 Active Member

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    You should buy a used whizzer
     
  9. Venice Motor Bikes

    Venice Motor Bikes Custom Builder / Dealer/Los Angeles

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    My suggestion is to use a steel Felt cruiser & Worksman wheels.

    I used this combo for a 350lbs+ customer a few years ago & he's never had a problem. ;)
     
  10. LR Jerry

    LR Jerry Active Member

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    I'm 6'2" and 250 lbs. A steal frame is a must. 2" double walled rims. Extra thick slime intertubes. I personally use a Staton Inc hub. Seat and front suspension. If there are steep hills to contend with consider a shiftkit. Most important of all lookup and read the person's local laws before buying and building anything.
     
    #10 LR Jerry, May 31, 2013
    Last edited: May 31, 2013
  11. Allen_Wrench

    Allen_Wrench Resident Mad Scientist

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    I'm kinda siding with the people who recommend good steel frames. I've worked with and welded aluminum, and it can handle quite a bit. But we're looking at above-average weight and payload in addition to vibration. This is right up steel's alley.
    And I love Worksman wheels; they're the greatest. You'd be glad you got 'em once you tried 'em. And a 52T (or bigger) sprocket will make the engine's life easier.
    And I would also say try to find the best brakes you can afford. She'll thank you for that.
     
  12. Master-shake

    Master-shake New Member

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    I'm going to go with the worksman wheels I'm sure. As for the frame, I have a two-nine genesis shimano frame. I have it in stock. Thanks for your suggestions guys. And the link! I'm getting her in here soon for a mock up fitting to see if this style and size bike are what she needs.

    Thanks again.

    I look forward to the day someone commissions a felt, alas this is not that build.
     
  13. maciver02

    maciver02 Member

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    I concur; Worksman is the BEST way to go here!
     

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