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New 1911 Military Indian fuel tank finished

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  #1  
Old 08-30-2012, 11:49 AM
cobrafreak cobrafreak is offline
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Default New 1911 Military Indian fuel tank finished

What you are looking at is the culmination of almost 40 hours of labor. It all started when my old fuel tank began to seep fuel out. After a single year the epoxy resin inside decayed and broke off, rattling around, clogging lines. It wasn't pretty. I learned from aircraft forums that the moment you use an epoxy resin liner to a fuel tank you have destroyed the chances of ever fixing the tank by conventional means again. Basically a good metal guy can fix anything. My problems were threefold. 1, I'm not a good metal guy (just OK). 2, My equipment isn't the greatest. 3, I have the wrong type of equipment. I have an ARC stick welder and a flux wire feed. Great for fixing things and fabricating frames, but totally wrong for fabricating tanks. The welds these machines create are too porous. No matter how good my welds are, they are still porous. So I meet Feelyx on the forum who happens to live just 3 miles away from me. He is a fabricating expert. He said that I need to silver solder the tank rather than weld or braze. He explained silver solder is not porous, is easy to fix if you need to such as crash damage, is very very strong, and requires minimal equipment. Silver Solder can withstand 70,000 PSI of force, just under what welded metal is. Plenty strong for our purpose. Silver solder is considered "high temperature solder", but is much cooler than brazing which requires a gas/oxygen torch to get hot and can distort sheet metal. So I started out with 18 gauge galvanized sheet metal. Feelyx (Tim) taught me how to properly silver solder using just a propane torch. You need a hardware store propane torch, hydrochloric acid (muratic swimming pool acid), silver solder, wire brushes, and cans of brake or carburetor cleaner. You dilute the acid 8:1 with tap water. Diluted at this ratio works great for metal work and doesn't harm your hands if you get it on you. You roughen up the metal with the wire brush, clean the metal with brake cleaner to get the oils out, acid splash the area, heat area with torch, and apply the silver solder till it flows properly. Hand tools that make sheet metal work easier are a 30" sheet metal brake, left, right, and straight cut snips, sheet metal hammer and pliers, and an air flanger for seams. Harbor Freight tools has everything you need for a reasonable amount of money. Very time consuming, but this tank will last forever and has no need for any epoxy resin sealant. OK, a little about the tank itself. Notice the shift lever? Yes, it's off my first China Girl build. It has no purpose other than looking period, but it's spring loaded and you can go through the motions as you ride to give a vintage effect. Mounted on top is a Faux manuel oil pump lever. It's just silver soldered on top. It too is spring loaded and it can be operated to give effect. The fuel filler cap on the right is a huge 1 1/4" nut that is machined down to match the fuel gauge indicator on the left. Yes a real working fuel gauge. It is mechanical and works with a float arm. You can see the bright yellow indicator showing full tank. The gas cap is not vented. I run a copper line from the back bottom to the inside top to internally vent the tank like modern tanks are. I have a vintage glass and brass sediment fuel filter/petcock. Looks period and functions great.




Last edited by cobrafreak; 08-30-2012 at 12:26 PM.
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Old 08-30-2012, 12:02 PM
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azbill azbill is offline
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Default Re: New 1911 Military Indian fuel tank finished

nice !!!
I am assuming the right side has a suicide clutch,
but I cannot figure out the black knob on the left ???
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Old 08-30-2012, 12:32 PM
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Default Re: New 1911 Military Indian fuel tank finished

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Originally Posted by azbill View Post
nice !!!
I am assuming the right side has a suicide clutch,
but I cannot figure out the black knob on the left ???
Both levers are non-funcional but can be operated to give effect. The right side would be a shift and the lever on the left is a Faux manuel oil pump lever which you would need to pump occasionally on a real antique motorcycle to get oil through the engine. Old motorcycles didn't have automatic oil pumps or pressurized oil. You pumped by hand every couple of miles and the oil would work it's way from the top to the bottom and leaked out onto the ground. Stone age, but that is the way they were.
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Old 08-30-2012, 11:49 PM
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Default Re: New 1911 Military Indian fuel tank finished

Looks pretty cool. See you at the Whizz-in in October?
Pat
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Old 08-31-2012, 07:20 AM
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Default Re: New 1911 Military Indian fuel tank finished

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Looks pretty cool. See you at the Whizz-in in October?
Pat

Yes! I would like to be at the Whiz-in again. Here is the details for those that would like to show up.
http://www.westcoastwhizzers.com/events.html

Last edited by cobrafreak; 08-31-2012 at 07:25 AM.
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Old 08-31-2012, 10:06 AM
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Default Re: New 1911 Military Indian fuel tank finished

I believe it's October 6th, a Saturday. Sunday morning is the swap meet. I may bring a late model Whizzer to the event to sell.
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Old 08-31-2012, 10:22 AM
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Default Re: New 1911 Military Indian fuel tank finished

Checked with my Wife (I need to do that occasionally lol) and She gave the seal of approval. She will go too and ride the Schwinn 4 stroke I made. It will be fun.
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Old 08-31-2012, 08:52 PM
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Default Re: New 1911 Military Indian fuel tank finished

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Originally Posted by cobrafreak View Post
What you are looking at is the culmination of almost 40 hours of labor. It all started when my old fuel tank began to seep fuel out. After a single year the epoxy resin inside decayed and broke off, rattling around, clogging lines. It wasn't pretty. I learned from aircraft forums that the moment you use an epoxy resin liner to a fuel tank you have destroyed the chances of ever fixing the tank by conventional means again. Basically a good metal guy can fix anything. My problems were threefold. 1, I'm not a good metal guy (just OK). 2, My equipment isn't the greatest. 3, I have the wrong type of equipment. I have an ARC stick welder and a flux wire feed. Great for fixing things and fabricating frames, but totally wrong for fabricating tanks. The welds these machines create are too porous. No matter how good my welds are, they are still porous. So I meet Feelyx on the forum who happens to live just 3 miles away from me. He is a fabricating expert. He said that I need to silver solder the tank rather than weld or braze. He explained silver solder is not porous, is easy to fix if you need to such as crash damage, is very very strong, and requires minimal equipment. Silver Solder can withstand 70,000 PSI of force, just under what welded metal is. Plenty strong for our purpose. Silver solder is considered "high temperature solder", but is much cooler than brazing which requires a gas/oxygen torch to get hot and can distort sheet metal. So I started out with 18 gauge galvanized sheet metal. Feelyx (Tim) taught me how to properly silver solder using just a propane torch. You need a hardware store propane torch, hydrochloric acid (muratic swimming pool acid), silver solder, wire brushes, and cans of brake or carburetor cleaner. You dilute the acid 8:1 with tap water. Diluted at this ratio works great for metal work and doesn't harm your hands if you get it on you. You roughen up the metal with the wire brush, clean the metal with brake cleaner to get the oils out, acid splash the area, heat area with torch, and apply the silver solder till it flows properly. Hand tools that make sheet metal work easier are a 30" sheet metal brake, left, right, and straight cut snips, sheet metal hammer and pliers, and an air flanger for seams. Harbor Freight tools has everything you need for a reasonable amount of money. Very time consuming, but this tank will last forever and has no need for any epoxy resin sealant. OK, a little about the tank itself. Notice the shift lever? Yes, it's off my first China Girl build. It has no purpose other than looking period, but it's spring loaded and you can go through the motions as you ride to give a vintage effect. Mounted on top is a Faux manuel oil pump lever. It's just silver soldered on top. It too is spring loaded and it can be operated to give effect. The fuel filler cap on the right is a huge 1 1/4" nut that is machined down to match the fuel gauge indicator on the left. Yes a real working fuel gauge. It is mechanical and works with a float arm. You can see the bright yellow indicator showing full tank. The gas cap is not vented. I run a copper line from the back bottom to the inside top to internally vent the tank like modern tanks are. I have a vintage glass and brass sediment fuel filter/petcock. Looks period and functions great.




And you forgot the best part..... The Burgers!
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Old 09-01-2012, 12:44 AM
cobrafreak cobrafreak is offline
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Default Re: New 1911 Military Indian fuel tank finished

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Originally Posted by feelyx View Post
And you forgot the best part..... The Burgers!
Ah yes. We had what may be the best burger in town at a taco place of all places. Imagine ground beef and pork and hot peppers. Wow it was good!
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Old 09-01-2012, 08:51 PM
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Default Re: New 1911 Military Indian fuel tank finished

Nice job on the new tank. 40hrs seems like a reasonable amount of time to build a tank from scratch in my opinion. Especially for someone who just does this as a hobby. I'm sure I have invested way more time than that on tanks before.

How did you weld it? Mig or tig?
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