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Motorized Bicycle Welding, Fabrication and Painting - The Chop Shop Custom fabrication and projects, tanks, frames and more.

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  #51  
Old 01-15-2012, 08:28 PM
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thegnu thegnu is offline
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Default Re: Welcome To The Welding & Metalworking Forum

Just for the record my mig is 15 yrs old aside from changing tips I replaced the rollers 1 time an the torch 2 times all you need do is maintain an care for your equipment . a 110 mig may be all some can afford , an with a short class on welding or the help of a welder friend I have seen those 110 migs weld fairly nice, within their capabilities.
Gary
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  #52  
Old 01-15-2012, 11:04 PM
MEASURE TWICE MEASURE TWICE is offline
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Default Re: Welcome To The Welding & Metalworking Forum

A neighbor has one that is also 110 and I think about the same amp like my Hobart 130, theirs is a Miller. The Hobart of mine actually uses parts from Miller as they have some connection on the smaller welders. License to use design or something. I got a bigger spool than what the machine will run unless you get the adapter. I told the guys at AirGas that it was Hobart and the part that came is Miller anyway.

One thing I do when putting it away I cover all the gas connectors so they don't get scratched. I make a large coil around the welder with the hose so as not to kink.

I'm will get guidance from the neighbor watch an see and then use my welder experiment on scrap first. It was about two years ago took the two quick classes on MIG an TIG, then only used the TIG at the shop for about 5 months. I'll get pic when I get something done and post.

MT
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  #53  
Old 01-16-2012, 02:58 PM
Bicycle Motor Fun Bicycle Motor Fun is offline
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Default Re: Welcome To The Welding & Metalworking Forum

I have a Lincoln MiG welder that has a 240vac input. I use .035 flux core wire in it and I can weld up to 5/16" thick; I use my Lincoln 230 stick welder for heavier welding. My MiG welder came with a smaller wire cablel; with it installed and a shielding gas cylinder attached, very thin sheet metal can be welded. I weld light gauge sheet metal and I have only used the .035 flux core wire; it is so convenient. If you were to weld 20 and 22 gauge sheet metals, such as in auto body work, you would need the smaller welding wire and shielding gas. Stick with a name brand welder and expect to spend some money and get a good one and you will be a "happy camper"! BMF
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  #54  
Old 01-16-2012, 08:14 PM
jokesonu jokesonu is offline
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Default Re: Welcome To The Welding & Metalworking Forum

I wholeheartedly agree with you BMF. I used a machine similar to yours for about 5 months it was a sweet little machine. I was building truck beds with vacuum tanks built onto them. Used it all day everyday. Neat thing is, I can go to most any welding supply and get a set of .023 rollers for it and a few tips and go do bodywork. I don't know if harbor freight does or not they very well might. I've used cheap welders and 3 phase 400 amp mig machines running .052 and 1/16 wires both coreweld and well hobart calls their stuff fabshield 21b. It's the gasless flux wire in the trade its smokerwire cause it soots up like burning tires. The smoke itself is full of CO2 and that is what protects the weld from the air while it is molten. We don't use it in the shop though we use a coreweld wire with argon co2 mix. I guess I've worked on tanks, pipes, all kinds of structural steel.

I didn't mean to sound like I was belittling the idea of a 110 volt welders. I just don't think they are very easy to learn with. And its awful easy to mess up a weld in a big hurry with flux wire if the wire speed and voltage are wrong you will bury slag pockets all the way through. I wouldn't advise a beginner to start welding bike frames. It's too thin to miss with you either burn up the joint or zap a bunch of glop on it. I can run it and did successfully saved myself a bunch of bucks on my old pickup truck frame. I had some upper steering arm bolts rattle on the frame and broke the web of the car channel frame clear out. I beveled it up and welded it back in and never had a problem with it. If I coulda got into it better I would have rather used my arc welder. It did a nice job though the frame was about 1/8 thick at the web maybe 3/16. The little machine I had I think was 90 amps. It would have been way easier to use if it had a good 0-100 voltage control I could have dialed down the wire and still kept a short arc. It only had low which was too cold and hi which was too hot. I actually inherited it from my dad who tried to teach himself to weld with it and it made him so frustrated and mad he made me take it lol. So good luck in your endeavers.

If I had 100 bucks and just wanted to learn to weld with this bicycle type stuff I would buy a small torch set. One with a cutting head for the torch and also different size brazing tips and learn to cut, braze, and weld with the torch. I would feel better about tooling down the road on a nicely brazed bike frame than one that was glopped together with flux core. And I have seen guys that can do a nice job on aluminum with it. Looks really bad when I try it but I can solder and braze copper with one. I have a tig welder I use for aluminum.
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  #55  
Old 01-17-2012, 03:55 AM
Marklink Marklink is offline
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Default Re: Welcome To The Welding & Metalworking Forum

i am newbie of this forum :-)
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  #56  
Old 01-17-2012, 08:14 AM
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thegnu thegnu is offline
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Default Re: Welcome To The Welding & Metalworking Forum

I wish I had more exp in tig an heliarc , just to be a more versatile welder .
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  #57  
Old 01-24-2012, 01:01 AM
Marklink Marklink is offline
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Default Re: Welcome To The Welding & Metalworking Forum

I have require information about Flap Disk , Diamond blades etc..
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  #58  
Old 01-24-2012, 09:21 PM
jokesonu jokesonu is offline
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Default Re: Welcome To The Welding & Metalworking Forum

Here is another reason to watch 110 volt welders. Sounds like a neat idea and handy as **** but not really cause you are gonna be at the max on your circuit breaker. Especially bad with an extension cord even a good one.

I decided I wanted to tig weld cause I push mig wire all day long and its not my idea of fun anymore. So last summer I bought a chinese inverter tig, stick, and plasma cutter. It supposedly can be wired to 110 volt or 220 so with my bad experience with 110 I wired it to 220, I already had the service to another bigger ac arc welder. On a 30 amp breaker it works great for the little stuff I'm working on. I also bought a foot pedal and I think I got about 600 in it. Mine won't weld aluminum though cause its a straight dc invertor. You need ac current to tig aluminum although I have and can with the unit at work called a square wave. It's probably close to 3 grand though and I wasn't gonna drop that much. The kicker for me was the plasma torch. It's not the nicest torch I have used but it will zip apart sheet metal as fast as you can move it. I already had the air compressor to supply the air. Here is the gas tank I made with it I zipped my pieces out of 18 ga carbon steel , match ground the sides and fit it together corner to corner joint and tig welded it. http://motorbicycling.com/attachment...ized_tank2.jpg

I used a flapper disk on my 41/2 angle grinder to finish the edges. Also to clean the metal to a shine along the edges of the joint. I have a second angle grinder set up with a 1/16 thick cutoff wheel. Any light trimming I do with that. I found out I didn't like swapping disks on the grinder so now I have two. I couldn't pass up the 4 1/2 paddle trigger grinder at harbor freight. I paid 29 bucks for it. It's as good as my old black and decker I paid 90 bucks for years ago. The harbor freight grinding and cutting wheels are kind of soft and wear out quick but I like the price a lot better than at my steel supply store. They are great for small hobby type light duty stuff.
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  #59  
Old 01-28-2012, 06:34 PM
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Ibedayank Ibedayank is offline
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Default Re: Welcome To The Welding & Metalworking Forum

Quote:
Originally Posted by MEASURE TWICE View Post
. The Hobart of mine actually uses parts from Miller as they have some connection on the smaller welders. License to use design or something.
MT
miller is the parent company of hobart
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  #60  
Old 02-24-2012, 06:45 PM
jlmartin jlmartin is offline
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Default Re: Welcome To The Welding & Metalworking Forum

Both Miller and Hobart are owned by Illinois Tool Works Inc. Google ITW

Have fun, Jim
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