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Motorized Bicycle General Discussion All topics regarding bicycles with engines.

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  #481  
Old 05-24-2011, 12:50 AM
Drewd Drewd is offline
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Default Re: Motorized Bicycle Take a Tip...Leave a Tip

Drill a hole for your throttle to ensure your throttle won't rotate. I pull the pin out of the throttle assembly and then drill a much smaller hole and then screw in a small machine screw. Never had any problem with doing this.

To help secure fuel tanks and chain tensioners, put double sided take on both. You'll never have to worry about either becoming loose after tightening them down.
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  #482  
Old 05-24-2011, 04:34 PM
bigbutterbean bigbutterbean is offline
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Default Re: Motorized Bicycle Take a Tip...Leave a Tip

Yeah, drilling a hole and putting a screw through the throttle might work. However, putting rubber in between the throttle and the handlebar has two advantages. One, it doesn't require drilling. Two, you can adjust the position of the throttle on the handlebar if you so desire. If you drill holes and mount it rigid, and later want to change the position, you have to drill another hole. The handlebars I have now are not drilled. All I did was put the strip of rubber on and tighten the screws, and it works great. No sliding. I can move it around any direction I want. As a matter of fact, I think I'm gonna go adjust it right now, because I don't like where my brake handle is at.
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  #483  
Old 05-24-2011, 05:21 PM
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Al.Fisherman Al.Fisherman is offline
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Repairing a gas tank AFTER you put gas into it, using a torch

Remove as much fuel that you can, don't worry about all of it. Take a length of hose that will fit into the filler. Insert the other end into a exhaust pipe of a gas burner, making sure the exhaust will flow through the hose and into the tank. Let run until the gas tank gets as hot as the exhaust. Liquid gas will not burn, only the fumes. Once the tank is hot (about 10 minutes), let cool to handle it. Now you can braise, weld or whatever. When, back in the days of the dinosaurs, we had steel gas tanks...that is how we repaired them....I have never had a tank so much as go poof putting a flame to them. The CO2 from the exhaust kills the firing properties of gas.
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  #484  
Old 05-27-2011, 03:03 AM
bigbutterbean bigbutterbean is offline
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Don't EVER use pliers or any other tool to tighten the cap on your carburetor barrel. It will take the barrel out of round and your throttle slide will get stuck in the barrel, leaving you stuck either at WOT or unable to accelerate at all. I currently have this problem, and the slide gets stuck at WOT. I have to try to straighten out the barrel in the morning. Hopefully it works. So, long story short, hand tighten only when attaching throttle to carb.
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  #485  
Old 06-16-2011, 01:00 AM
MechEng MechEng is offline
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When installing Manic Mechanic's sprocket hub adapter, put carbon fiber assembly gel between the hub and the adapter. The gel has a micro-aggregate in it which will increase the friction between the assembled parts, reducing the chance of slippage. It can be purchased, begged, or bartered from your friendly mechanics at your local independent bike shop.
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  #486  
Old 06-22-2011, 12:29 PM
twelvestringtex twelvestringtex is offline
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I'm about half-way through the break-in period on my Grubee Skyhawk 2-stroker, and that first tank of gas pulled me about 50 miles despite fuel leaks, driving too fast, and inefficiencies of a new engine. One thing worth noting, it's really disappointing straight out of the box, and the first time you fire it up, but after that it just gets more fun every day!

Tips I've found...

#1)

Get a trunk rack, and trunk box. keep a vise-grip, socket set, bike tools, leftover bits of innertube, fuel line, chain, masterlinks, and thread locker. I've found it useful to carry around nearly enough tools to re-install the motor during the break-in period, just because so much of the assembly hasn't quite settled into place yet.

#2)
use that bit of inner-tube to make a gasket for any bicycle or motor components that try to slip around on the frame. Chain tensioner, Front derailleur, both engine brackets.

#3)
Replace the fuel line with something about 1/4" for a snugger fit, use hose clamps, and get some gasket sealer for the petcock. Teflon tape disintegrates.
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  #487  
Old 06-22-2011, 05:03 PM
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GearNut GearNut is offline
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Default Re: Motorized Bicycle Take a Tip...Leave a Tip

In reference to #2):
Putting any kind of rubber between the engine mounts and the frame tubing is asking for trouble. Yes, it will reduce the vibrations transferred to the frame by a little bit and may help with preventing the engine from slipping on the frame for a little while, but....and this is an important but.....it transferrs all the vibrations to the mounts and mount studs/ bolts. As the engine and it's mounts now shake and vibrate on the rubber it puts alot of additional stress on the hardware and will eventually lead to hardware failure.
Just do a search on "broken studs" to learn just how fun those are to deal with!

Ultimately an engine needs to be solidly mounted to the frame, and if there are any gaps in between the frame and mounts anywhere around the tubing, the mounts need to be filed or sanded to match up the curvature of them to the curvature of the frame tubing. A good tight fit means all the vibration is transferred to the frame which can handle it a heck of alot better than 4 teeny studs or bolts can. The mounts stay solid and secure, no shaking and vibrating to cause failure down the road.
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  #488  
Old 06-22-2011, 05:21 PM
twelvestringtex twelvestringtex is offline
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That makes sense, the other thing that made me put those rubber gaskets in was to protect the frame, I had started to see aluminum flakes coming off where the motor was rubbing the frame. I guess that'd be solved by a better fit though. thanks!
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  #489  
Old 06-22-2011, 09:09 PM
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GearNut GearNut is offline
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Custom fitting the mounts is the best way to go, but I will toss this out to you only as a last resort technique.
Some folks have had good luck with using liquid steel stick (generic name), which is like JB weld only it is a putty. Pack it into the mounts, put a single layer of plastic wrap around the frame tubing and install the engine. Scrape off the excess that squishes out and let the putty dry. Remove the engine to facilitate removal of the plastic wrap.
I cannot recommend doing it this way though unless you have no other alternative.
JB weld, or any kind of "steel" filler putty is just a fancy epoxy with the word steel in it's name. Epoxy is basically a form of plastic so if you do it this way keep an eye on it for cracking or separation from the metal you want it to stick to.
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Does not come with a fortune cookie."
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Last edited by GearNut; 06-22-2011 at 09:11 PM. Reason: Re-wording.
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  #490  
Old 06-25-2011, 02:47 PM
uuu? uuu? is offline
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Unhappy Re: Motorized Bicycle Take a Tip...Leave a Tip

hey

i just put my kit on and the Carburetor (New High Performance Gen B Carburetor from the GRUBEE 2010 SkyHawk GT5 66cc/80cc Angle Fire Slant Head Bicycle Engine Kit ) is leaking out of the filter on the back/red part.

i have never worked with a bike kit but i did put it together. it was running ok but it got a leak. it fluds with gas.

please help me, i dont know how to fix it and would like to know what to do before i try to fix it.
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